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Take fat kids into care, say experts

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posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 11:29 PM
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Originally posted by Karlhungis
reply to post by tezzajw
 

I am not really sure what most parent think when they do this. I would have to guess that in most cases the parents are in denial about their role in the weight of their child, blaming it on genetics or some other ailment. Other cases the parents simply don't want to deal with the fight, so they give the child whatever they want. Either way, I wish they would simply realize the lifetime of pain and disease that they are giving them.



I think most of the parents are probably themselves obese, and in order to ensure that their children are healthy they would have to raise the bar for themselves. THis would mean a lot of work, or letting go to the emotional issues attatched to their weight. Too much to ask, in most cases.




posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 


Yes her parents allowed bad habits to take hold. However, I mean, didn't she look in the mirror? I'm sure she got teased... kids know what food is healthy and not healthy. (Except on one case on Maury where they fed the kid fried chicken and ice cream like it was salad)

I mean, they exercise in school, they are encouraged by the schools to join sports and things.

In CT, we also have a state fitness test. If you don't pass (like my friend because she smokes) you have to write a seven page research paper and get a good grade on it, or you don't graduate. You don't graduate high school. No matter what your grades are in other classes.

You have to score a certain number on the sit and reach (flexibility), do a certain number of pushups and curlups, and run a mile in a certain amount of time. It's all determined by your gender and age, how well you have to do, not your weight. Like, I had whooping cough a few years back and I'm just a bad runner so I had to run the mile twice and made it in 9:59, a second to spare.

Totally sucks. But if you're fat and too lazy to write a research paper, you don't graduate. It happened to a guy I know who should have graduated two years ago.



posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 


This is true.... and also very sad. What happened to sacrifice and wanting a better life for your children than you have for yourself? I know that I am not a perfect person and when I see my daughter picking up a bad habit of mine, I correct her on it and apologize for doing it. Then I make a conscious effort to correct that in myself. It may be a bit hypocritical but I think it is better than just saying, "well, I do it so she can too...."



posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 11:39 PM
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Originally posted by ravenshadow13
reply to post by asmeone2
 


Yes her parents allowed bad habits to take hold. However, I mean, didn't she look in the mirror? I'm sure she got teased... kids know what food is healthy and not healthy. (Except on one case on Maury where they fed the kid fried chicken and ice cream like it was salad)


As I said in my reply to karlhungis, I think many of these parents are the type of obese people that "hide behind their rolls" to compensate for some form of emotional insecurity.

This is probably passed on to the child at a very early age.

Even if it isn't, think about it, a kid of 4 or 5 isn't going to know how to eat properly--even if he does, he won't be able to buy his own food until he is 16 or so. He's basically stuck with waht Mom and Dad give him.



posted on Feb, 2 2009 @ 11:40 PM
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Originally posted by Karlhungis
reply to post by asmeone2
 


This is true.... and also very sad. What happened to sacrifice and wanting a better life for your children than you have for yourself? I know that I am not a perfect person and when I see my daughter picking up a bad habit of mine, I correct her on it and apologize for doing it. Then I make a conscious effort to correct that in myself. It may be a bit hypocritical but I think it is better than just saying, "well, I do it so she can too...."


I think it has switched to "Keep the kids distracted long enough so I can do my thing." I admit that this is something I struggle with too.



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