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Nabamun, Egyptian art from Temple of Karnak circa 1350 BC

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posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 11:03 PM
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Based on a thread by Jon_B at the Hall of Ma'at

Wall paintings from the tomb of Nabamun


The painting were discovered and removed in 1820 by Giovanni d'Athanasi and sold to the British Museum with a few smaller fragments going to other European Museums. It's thought that it was somewhere in the Dra Abu el-Naga area on the West Bank at Thebes. Nebamun himself was an accountant in charge of grain at the Temple of Karnak sometime around 1350 BC.


The thread with the art

Go to the link to see the rest of the art, certainly some of the best quality which shows scenes of how the Egyptians lived.




Proof that cats hunted snakes with knives - clever those Egyptian cats





[edit on 27/1/09 by Hanslune]




posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 11:18 PM
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Not sure what you're point is with the first painting but I really hope you're not serious with the 'Proof that cats hunted snakes with knives - clever those Egyptian cats" picture you put up. You wouldn't think that cat using a knife would be symbolism for a cat with claws? Again, what's you're point with this post?



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 11:40 PM
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Hans' point with post is to share the art.

Hans' point with the cat n snake picture with the comment "clever cat" is humour.

dont you have a sense of humour?


[edit on 27/1/09 by coredrill]



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 12:06 AM
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reply to post by coredrill
 


Obviously Coredrill you are more intuned to the meaning of this thread than the previous poster!



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 12:16 AM
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reply to post by Techsnow
 


The cat with the knife is an example of animism, giving non-human objects, human characteristics. The Egyptians were very involved with their animism. It's not just a pretty picture, the characters are gods. The snake is most likely Apophis and the cat is most likely Re.

Apophis is one of the gods of the underworld and in this case would represent death.

Re is the sun-god and giver of life. This picture represents Re's triumph over death. A very optimistic view.

Of course it could just be proof that cat's hunted snakes with knives in ancient Egypt.



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 12:22 AM
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Just noticed the Tree of Life in the background. So, Re is defeating Apophis and clearing the path to the Tree of Life. It's a very interesting picture considering the symbology of the Tree of Life, the serpent, and sun-god all being present in the same picture.

It kind of reminds me of the Garden of Eden story. Remember that God places a Cheribim and a flaming sword to guard the way to the Tree of Life, after he cast Adam and Eve out of the Garden, and after he dealt with the Serpent.

Similar story? Maybe two stories with a common origin?



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 12:27 AM
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Hey Hanslune,


I've a dumb question for ya: why are the eyes always so big? Everything else seems in proportion. Is it meant to symbolize something or am I just seeing things?



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 12:38 AM
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reply to post by Rren
 


Howdy Rren

I don't know why the Egyptians followed that artistic tradition. That would be good question to ask over at the Hall of Ma'at. The Egyptologists there might have an answer for you. Just follow the link.



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 06:15 AM
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Amazing, and really beautiful. It's not often I've seen such vividly preserved Egyptian art.


The cat killing the bird with a knife is classic!! And he's looking out at the viewer, in a 'breaking the fourth wall' kind of way.



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 06:25 AM
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Ancient Egyptians did have a funny bone!!!

I should imagine Obelix shaking his head and saying "these Crazy Egyptians" instead of "These Crazy Romans"

That paintings are beautiful.



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by lunarminer
reply to post by Techsnow
 


The cat with the knife is an example of animism, giving non-human objects, human characteristics. The Egyptians were very involved with their animism. It's not just a pretty picture, the characters are gods. The snake is most likely Apophis and the cat is most likely Re.

Apophis is one of the gods of the underworld and in this case would represent death.

Re is the sun-god and giver of life. This picture represents Re's triumph over death. A very optimistic view.

Of course it could just be proof that cat's hunted snakes with knives in ancient Egypt.


I think you win the "Got it in one!" prize for today. Yes, you're correct... that's the "Tomcat Re" and the snake IS Apophis and it refers to the nightly destruction of the Snake of the Underworld. I had to go look up information on Re manifesting as a cat... never ran into that one before, but apparently one of his titles is "The Tomcat Re."

I like his hunting cat as well. It'd be a handy animal to have around... if only I could get it to fetch my pencils!



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 08:55 PM
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Thank you.

You know, I was thinking last night that the knife looks very modern. I thought that it was very unusual because most people at the time the picture was painted were still using very primitive knives, made of copper or bronze. This one looks like it's made of steel or at least iron. It almost makes me wonder if the time period of 1350 BC might be wrong.



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 11:09 PM
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reply to post by lunarminer
 


Howdy LM

As I understand it was dated based on his tomb having reference to his working for Thutmose IV and or Amenhotep III. The blade was probably reflecting a bronze knife although iron was known at that time but rare and expensive in Egypt at that time. Old Tut had an iron dagger and a number of other items in his tomb and he dates just after this guy.



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