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So today in sociology...

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posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 08:59 PM
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So today during my sociology class at Rutgers University, our prof. briefly touched upon topics that he will cover during the upcoming semester. Sure there were the general topics found in every boring sociology textbook, but one topic he said caught my attention. My professor quickly said he would be discussing the 9/11 conspiracy theories. After class, I ran off to my recitation in order to ask my T.A. about the subject. He showed up a few minutes late so we really couldn't discuss the issue, but according to my T.A., my professor "is a firm believer of the theories and tries to educate his classes with the truth."

I know this really isn't news or anything, but I had yet to hear of any college, high school, or any level of school, treat the 9/11 conspiracies as fact. And not only that, try to persuade the class into believing them. I'll be sure to update as time progresses.




posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 09:09 PM
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This is the first I have heard of 9/11 being talked about in a Sociology class, too.

I am taking Sociology as a senior in high school, and I know for a fact that we won't be covering that subject. We pretty much just stick to the textbook.



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by wisefoolishness
 


That's cause your in HIGH school, where they don't really teach you anything of value.

I think it's great they're doing that in Universities like yours, just be prepared to see some hefty handed opposition from some students, even maybe some faculty over the lectures.



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 09:16 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


It's a college course though.


I do agree with the rest of your sentence, however, haha.



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by xlc sil3nce
 


Being as it is sociology , a discussion about conspiracy theories would not be too out of place, if he can couch his discussion within the subject ~ his ass is covered.

Now if he was the head of Engineering ........ different story.



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 09:40 PM
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Not if he was talking about how the building was set with explosive and taken down lol



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 09:49 PM
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Here are a couple other professors on the subject. www.youtube.com...

And THIS guy was berated for teaching it in class by hannity and combs.
www.youtube.com...

By the way, those two scumbags make me want to puke. (Hannity and Combs-his-hair-over)



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 09:51 PM
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I know a bunch of professors and teachers at the high school and college levels who are open about their views on 9/11.
I don't think it's very uncommon.



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 10:57 PM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13
 



Yes, I have had other teachers who have been open with their views, but I thought this was interesting because I have never heard of a professor basically lecturing on how he believes the buildings were taken down.



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 11:21 PM
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In the very conservative state of Indiana, which is where I live, teachers would be burned at the stake for mentioning something like this. I'll never know what teachers may or may not think about 9/11 because they are afraid of the possibility of losing their job, and frankly I don't blame them.

Just curious, but do you live in a more liberal part of the country xlc sil3nce?



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 11:30 PM
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Would be pretty neat if you could bring a tape recorder and some input of you're own to the class and then bring the audio back to ATS. I know I wouldn't be the only one interested in what he (and you and the class) would have to say on the subject.



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 02:12 AM
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That sounds interesting. But why talk about it in sociology class? Shouldn't your professor talk about other things?

In my sociology class my professor talked about how like a year or two ago it would be impossible for Obama to be President and stuff like about why people commit suicide.

I don't think professors should use educational time to brainwash people into thinking their idea of the truth... even if it is true... because in college, well, I mean, in sociology, I'm sure your professor talked about this, you're supposed to be value free... so I don't see how this would help the students.



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 04:25 AM
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Your professor could be using the class as a laboratory for studying how easy it would be to get a group of people to buy into a conspiracy theory. Sort of like the Milgram experiment on obedience to authority, in the 1960s. (I teach sociology at a local college, btw.)



[edit on 1/28/2009 by randomviolins]



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 02:33 PM
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reply to post by randomviolins
 


Don't forget about Ron Jones' experiment, The Third Wave, an experiment done in the late 60's about Nazism in Germany.



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 06:31 PM
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You ask that question in jest, right?
Why in a Sociology class?!
Lets just *assume* for a second that there is a conspiracy behind the events of 9-11. One obvious reason for lecturing on this in Sociology would be to study the social acceptance or denial of said conspiracy, and the reasons why. Why the attack was carried out in such way and the reaction to the event. On and On you could go to study the societal impacts of such an event.
That is not even to mention the above "professor" who claims you could use such a class to study how easy it would be to get people to believe such a thing, true or false.



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 06:54 PM
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Originally posted by UmbraSumus
Being as it is sociology , a discussion about conspiracy theories would not be too out of place, if he can couch his discussion within the subject ~ his ass is covered.


Well, it can always be discussed as an illustration of how belief systems are formed with limited information, how a person comes to believe one thing over another, the spread of ideas in a population, how beliefs influence behaviors such as voting, etc. Those are all perfectly valid ways to explore the topic without coming down either "pro" or "anti" about it.

You can do the same thing about anything like that, particularly religion.

One of the degrees I have is in Sociology. It has a lot more substance to it than you would first think. After all, this big election with everybody getting all up in arms is pure Sociology in action. You can use physics to make a bomb, but social interaction and beliefs are what eventually determine where and when and on whom it is dropped.


[edit on 28-1-2009 by Nohup]



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 08:26 PM
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reply to post by Nohup
 


I agree, conspiracy theories are a form of social barometer right enough, who`s effect has been amplified dramatically with the advent of the Internet.

We`ve all witnessed the paranoia feed back loop take flight here on ATS.


Whether claims made here are true/ halve truths or outright fabrications ........ it is our reactions to them that proves fascinating every time.



posted on Jan, 28 2009 @ 09:08 PM
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Originally posted by wisefoolishness


Just curious, but do you live in a more liberal part of the country xlc sil3nce?



Im from and go to school in New Jersey. The school itself is very, very liberal though there is a good representation of conservatives through students and faculty.


For the record, I doubt anyone knows him, my professor's name is Lee Clarke



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