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The Effect of Time in Relation to Human Responce

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posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 01:44 AM
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In this note I wish to address the following concept as human beings do we miss preceiving what may occur around us? This is by no means a detail analysis it is simply my thoughts upon the subject. I feel however it is of the utmost importance due to its relevance in our time driven society...

While the answer to this question is very complex I will attempt to delve into the basic concept as opposed to the science. First of all it should be noted that recently there have be many social experiments dealing with this subject. The result is yes, in our time driven society we often miss what is important around us.

Josha Bell News Report

Link to video of Joshua busking as posted and edited by The Washington Post

In one experiment Joshua Bell a critically acclaimed violinist played in Grand Central Station. He played a total of 43 minutes and was barely noticed, he made out with $32.17... after playing some of the most difficult music for a violin.

The Good Samaritan Report
This experiment is quite interesting and would take a while to explain. In brief however the premise was that you take a bunch of individuals tell them they are going to teach a group of students about the parable of The Good Samaritan then give one of the groups of teachers a tight time limit to reach the students and the other a less tight time limit. Then ensure they see an individual clearly in need of help. They found that those with the tight time limit often did not stop and help.

Both of these experiments highlight the loss of humanity in our society. A society in which our daily lives are structured based upon time. In our rush racing time to get from point A to point B to get this or that done it is easy to miss what is around us. It leads one to question, if over 1000 commuters in Grand Central Station can ignore one of the most talented violinists currently alive in the world. And if individuals with the parable of The Good Samaritan can ignore a fellow human being in distress. What do we individually miss in our own lives?

Do we ignore injustice that may exist around us? Do we ignore simple gestures? Do we ignore ourselves? To these questions I have no concrete answers only thoughts... However I believe that the two experiments highlight the need for everyone to slow down. We need to slow down not only to smell the roses, but to simply be human once again. If we are to overcome the turbulent times that lay before us then it is of the utmost importance that humanity as a whole can work together. And currently it seems we are unable too, instead of thinking of the communal effect of our actions we think in a individualistic manner in which the constant race against time is all that matters.

This constant race against time manifests itself in many ways. We have an increased need to appear young, and youthful. We race time to complete projects to ensure top notch efficiency. There are 5 min or less dinners, meals you can eat in seconds that will give you enough nutrients for hours, power this, power that our society is whipped as time rides us into the ground.

Sorry for the lack of uniformity and the overall lack of completeness... I am no scholar however I am hoping to grow. I was merely only hoping to see if others were interested in this subject and in addition I wished to highlight the two studies. Albeit only one was scientific, I am sure there are others done by different universities. In closer however I wish to ask the following questions. Is our society time driven? If so how does it effect our life. If you want you can really talk about what ever you wish of course.

Cheers.




posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 07:39 AM
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reply to post by The Coup
 


Have you ever looked at a clock and seen the second hand hang for what seemed longer than a second.

I considered for years that time was not constant, and then I read a New Scientist article on the effect frequency of thought has on your perception of time.

From what I can remember we more often than not think at a constant rate, sometimes our minds go into overdrive and thought processes that would take usually X amount of time are done much faster.

So we use the speed of thought to quantify time subjectively, and when we look at a clock when we are in 'overdrive' it appears that time goes slower because we have more thought processes in that second.

As our mind goes faster time slows down.



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 02:30 PM
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Originally posted by nuisance value
reply to post by The Coup
 


As our mind goes faster time slows down.


Interesting thought really. We're simply cramming too much into a time slot thus our huge thought pattern warrants more time to compile.
So we think.



posted on Jul, 1 2012 @ 02:09 PM
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Originally posted by nuisance value
reply to post by The Coup
 


As our mind goes faster time slows down.


That is interesting. When you want something really bad you tend to think about it a lot, blocking out most everything else that you used to think about.

What about people who multi-task though? People who just seem to do it out of habit. ( That question, really, is for whomever happens to stumble upon this thread after 3+ years of hibernation) You're obviously thinking faster because you have to take care of 2 or 3 things in the same time frame, hopefully, that most people use to do just one thing. In that case, I would think that time moves quicker. Or at the very least, our perception of it simply because we are perceiving and doing 2 or 3 things at the same time.

Now, those projects might take a little longer than most people would think they should take because most people don't multi-task on a daily basis. So what they would see is someone piddling around on one project, and just when they think they've waited long enough for that one project to get done, Mr. or Mrs. Multi-task shows up with 2 or 3 under their belt, leaving everyone to wonder " How did they do that?"

It's no mystery really because while you were focusing on that one project that you wanted done, the other person was focusing on 2 or 3 that NEEDED to be done, so you didn't really see everything. Like a magician performing a slight of hand trick. You're focused on one thing while he's doing more.

This is why the perception of time is subjective IMO. Different people see things in different ways. Some people like to do just one thing at a time. I think I'd go batsh*t crazy if I had to that because time would just d........r.........a...........g on. Like now, I've been having to wait for someone for a few weeks now before they were ready to do something that was paramount to something I need to do, and as a result, everything else was kind of put on hold because of that. Times like that is when I start doing more and more things, like post here just to name one, just to compensate for that one thing I can't do. I understand that people have their own lives and schedule......but still

While this topic is interesting, I think the most interesting part of it all is that the OP has made just one post, this one, in 3 and half years.

It's almost as if he's biding his time huh? Just........waiting.

Hope he's listening to this...it's upbeat:

youtu.be...




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