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Retired Colonel John B. Alexander Admits UFOs are Real

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posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 05:42 PM
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“UFOs are real. The evidence for things flying all over our skies that aren’t ours is overwhelming,” Alexander says. “And most scientists won’t go near it because they think Condon” – first name Edward, who supervised the Colorado project — “conducted a thorough study, which he did not. We need to make it permissible for scientists to study again, and what Senator Pell went through shows you what happens to a serious person attempts to study it.


Alexander, like many, seems to have misinterpreted the conclusions of the Condon report. Condon did not claim that there was nothing to be learned in the study of UFO reports. The misinterpretation is based mostly on a single sentence in the report.

Careful consideration of the record as it is available to us leads us to conclude that further extensive study of UFOs probably cannot be justified in the expectation that science will be advanced thereby.

But by reading the entire section on Conclusions and Recommendations it is clear that Condon encourages "keeping an open mind" in spite of its own conclusions. They admit they are not perfect, that other may be able to do something which they could not.

Just as individual scientists may make errors of judgment about fruitful directions for scientific effort, so also any individual administrator or committee which is charged with deciding on financial support for research proposals may also make an error of judgment. This possibility is minimized by the existence of parallel channels, for consideration by more than one group, of proposals for research projects. In the period since 1945, the federal government has evolved flexible and effective machinery for giving careful consideration to proposals from properly qualified scientists. What to some may seem like duplicated machinery actually acts as a safeguard against errors being made by some single official body. Even so, some errors could be made but the hazard is reduced nearly to zero.

Therefore we think that all of the agencies of the federal government, and the private foundations as well, ought to be willing to consider UFO research proposals along with the others submitted to them on an open-minded, unprejudiced basis. While we do not think at present that anything worthwhile is likely to come of such research each individual case ought to be carefully considered on its own merits.

files.ncas.org...

The report is not a wholesale condemnation of UFO research.




posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 06:55 PM
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Hmm.. more smoke and mirrors.. wouldnt trust the word of a spook on anything..



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 06:59 PM
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Originally posted by amigo
May I suggest that you all shift focus from the article, because it's not that much significant except being an outlet, to who Col. John Alexander is (post-retirement), or was (in his career)?

I am sure those who search will find much amusing information on his background (what's publicly available) and perhaps connect the dots afterwards...


From my point of view, he always gravitated to whacko projects during his entire career. And he was tied up in a bunch of them, I recall he was big buds with Uncle Al as well as being into UFOs and death beams and the like.

What amazed me was that he could be associated with that stuff and keep going all the way to O-6. THAT takes talent.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by Norio Hayakawa
 




Although this happened to me in the early 1990's, this may have made me be leary of groups such as the National Institute for Discovery Sciences (NIDS), financed by Robert Bigelow of Las Vegas.
Alexander, I believe, was under the payroll of Mr. Bigelow at that time.
I fear that the utlimate goal of groups such as NIDS may be to dominate and control the flow of UFO information through their vast financial resources and to infiltrate groups such as MUFON, etc.
I may be wrong on this. I am not sure.


I wouldn't be surprised. Jacques Vallée was involved with NIDS and some suggest that he was/is also part of the Aviary. A possible NIDS-Aviary connection perhaps.



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 09:25 PM
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And...........ex government official #48,982 has come forward to claim UFO's are real.


This means absolutely nothing.


Look up methods of fixing belief. Specifically the method of authority which states we tend to place too much faith in the words of individuals we view to have power over us.

It's a logical "no-no" and, as already stated, does nothing to further this field whatsoever.

Things of this nature will never be interesting until someone comes forward and claims something along the lines of, "UFO's are indeed E.T, and here's the proof: (irrefutable proof)."



posted on Jun, 23 2010 @ 09:29 PM
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Also, this guy didn't "admit" anything.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 06:07 PM
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Not according to the recent book that he wrote:

COL. JOHN ALEXANDER PLANTS UFO DOUBTS IN NEW BOOK

Here is an interesting new item:

Col. John Alexander plants UFO doubts in new book


This is really not that surprising, coming from Col. John Alexander.
Check out the following:

The strange behavior of Col. John Alexander in the early 1990s

In fact, I personally do not get a good feeling about the whole NIDS, as well as the mess that is taking place with MUFON, etc.:

Col. John Alexander, Robert Bigelow and the goals of NIDS?


The Civilian Intelligence Network now on Facebook




Alexander, like many, seems to have misinterpreted the conclusions of the Condon report. Condon did not claim that there was nothing to be learned in the study of UFO reports. The misinterpretation is based mostly on a single sentence in the report.

Careful consideration of the record as it is available to us leads us to conclude that further extensive study of UFOs probably cannot be justified in the expectation that science will be advanced thereby.

But by reading the entire section on Conclusions and Recommendations it is clear that Condon encourages "keeping an open mind" in spite of its own conclusions. They admit they are not perfect, that other may be able to do something which they could not.

Just as individual scientists may make errors of judgment about fruitful directions for scientific effort, so also any individual administrator or committee which is charged with deciding on financial support for research proposals may also make an error of judgment. This possibility is minimized by the existence of parallel channels, for consideration by more than one group, of proposals for research projects. In the period since 1945, the federal government has evolved flexible and effective machinery for giving careful consideration to proposals from properly qualified scientists. What to some may seem like duplicated machinery actually acts as a safeguard against errors being made by some single official body. Even so, some errors could be made but the hazard is reduced nearly to zero.

Therefore we think that all of the agencies of the federal government, and the private foundations as well, ought to be willing to consider UFO research proposals along with the others submitted to them on an open-minded, unprejudiced basis. While we do not think at present that anything worthwhile is likely to come of such research each individual case ought to be carefully considered on its own merits.

files.ncas.org...

The report is not a wholesale condemnation of UFO research.




posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by Fastriver
 


Yeah -- well it does seem according to your links that it's hard to pin down what Colonel Alexander believes regarding UFOs. But like I said over 2 years ago when this thread started, Colonel Alexander is allowed to have his personal opinions regarding UFOs. However, as I noted then, his opinions have never been backed up by any "special knowledge" he has -- he is just like everyone else who has an opinion regarding UFOs. His former occupation is irrelevant.

I don't even like the title of this thread. Colonel Alexander is not "admitting" anything -- he is simply stating what he thinks. The title should read "Retired Colonel John B. Alexander Thinks UFOs are Real". To "admit" UFOs are real, he would need to have knowledge about them being real in the first place. However, Colonel Alexander has said he has no such knowledge, just beliefs.



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 06:59 PM
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Originally posted by avail



Wow , thats a real ignorant way to look at it.


How?



posted on Feb, 16 2011 @ 07:27 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
However, as I noted then, his opinions have never been backed up by any "special knowledge" he has -- he is just like everyone else who has an opinion regarding UFOs. His former occupation is irrelevant.

I don't even like the title of this thread. Colonel Alexander is not "admitting" anything -- he is simply stating what he thinks. The title should read "Retired Colonel John B. Alexander Thinks UFOs are Real". To "admit" UFOs are real, he would need to have knowledge about them being real in the first place. However, Colonel Alexander has said he has no such knowledge, just beliefs.


Do you think he may possibly be under a non-disclosure agreement ? Hence the phrase I think instead of I know ? As for his former occupation, are you aware he once held the position of DIA Associate Coordinator of Space Reconnaissance Activities ? That seems relevant to me.


Originally posted by Fastriver
COL. JOHN ALEXANDER PLANTS UFO DOUBTS IN NEW BOOK

Here is an interesting new item:

Col. John Alexander plants UFO doubts in new book


This answer struck me as ridiculous:

We thought there was probably a black program on UFOs somewhere in government, and those involved would probably be willing to work with a group that had appropriate clearances and could help disseminate information. What we found out, of course, was that there was no program and that information collection was pretty much ad hoc.


Absence of evidence is not the same thing as evidence of absence. People think, I'm important, I'm well informed, if I couldn't get any insider info about UFOs, it must not exist. His results are in direct opposition to Gordon Cooper who claims he was given confirmation of a black UFO program.

At any rate, Alexander is naive to believe a black world UFO group would be willing to share information with people not formally briefed or cleared for need to know. I tend to think any potential UFO research programs fall under the category of unacknowledged special access programs. People involved in activities of such sensitivity are given regular polygraphs to ensure they haven't talked. They aren't going to be forthcoming and help disseminate highly classified information.

However it's also possible any underground UFO research is no longer affiliated with the govt. It may be controlled by NGOs. In fact Dr. Eric Walker said this very thing. That govt/military are not involved in UFO research. But that UFO reverse engineering is carried out by private international organizations.

With a character like Col. Alexander, it's difficult to know if they're telling the whole truth or half truths. I noticed he's a speaker at the upcoming UFO congress. I wouldn't mind listening to his presentation, although his talk will probably amount to a summary and sales pitch for his newly released book.
edit on 16-2-2011 by Schaden because: fix tags



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 07:24 AM
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Originally posted by Schaden

Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
However, as I noted then, his opinions have never been backed up by any "special knowledge" he has -- he is just like everyone else who has an opinion regarding UFOs. His former occupation is irrelevant.

I don't even like the title of this thread. Colonel Alexander is not "admitting" anything -- he is simply stating what he thinks. The title should read "Retired Colonel John B. Alexander Thinks UFOs are Real". To "admit" UFOs are real, he would need to have knowledge about them being real in the first place. However, Colonel Alexander has said he has no such knowledge, just beliefs.


Do you think he may possibly be under a non-disclosure agreement ? Hence the phrase I think instead of I know ? As for his former occupation, are you aware he once held the position of DIA Associate Coordinator of Space Reconnaissance Activities ? That seems relevant to me....

Perhaps he lobbied to get himself into that position in the first place because he has a personal interest in space-related stuff, and had a pre-existing personal belief in alien-controlled UFOs -- a belief he still carries today (there are many people from many walks of life who have this belief). However, just because his job in the Military related to reconnaissance from space doesn't mean that he learned any first-hand knowledge of alien activity.

The argument that "High-ranking military officials like him most likely know about aliens, so if they say they don't, then they may be under a non-disclosure agreement" is a logical fallacy.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 08:06 AM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
The argument that "High-ranking military officials like him most likely know about aliens, so if they say they don't, then they may be under a non-disclosure agreement" is a logical fallacy.


No, it's not a fallacy. It is a valid statement.

It's logical that if a high ranking official is briefed on UFOs, they may not choose to relay that knowledge to the public in certain terms. "I know there are UFOs...."

Unfortunately the question of whether or not Alexander knows about them is unverifiable.

Frankly, the reality of the UFO phenomenon does not depend on this man's confirmation. We have plenty of other evidence they are real. That is not seriously in question. What the UFOs represent is the mystery.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 08:33 AM
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Originally posted by Schaden

Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
The argument that "High-ranking military officials like him most likely know about aliens, so if they say they don't, then they may be under a non-disclosure agreement" is a logical fallacy.


No, it's not a fallacy. It is a valid statement.

It's logical that if a high ranking official is briefed on UFOs, they may not choose to relay that knowledge to the public in certain terms. "I know there are UFOs...."

Unfortunately the question of whether or not Alexander knows about them is unverifiable.

Frankly, the reality of the UFO phenomenon does not depend on this man's confirmation. We have plenty of other evidence they are real. That is not seriously in question. What the UFOs represent is the mystery.


Right -- I'm saying a fallacy lies in the premise that "High-ranking military officials like him most likely know about aliens..."

There are some alien-visitation believers who seem to think that every high-ranking military official who says they have seen no evidence that UFOs are alien-controlled MUST be lying due to a non-disclosure agreement, pre-supposing that the official DOES IN FACT know something (also presupposing, I might add, that alien visitation is in fact happening).

Perhaps Col. Alexander is simply telling the truth when he says he has no first-hand knowledge that UFOs are under alien control. To assume that a denial is meaningful simply because it is a denial is quite a leap in logic.


edit on 2/17/2011 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 08:48 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 
I've no doubt the Colonel meant E.T. craft when he said U.F.O's are real, but was perhaps giving himself "a way out" by not being specific, in the event he found himself in hot water.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 




First of all, of course UFOs -- in the strict sense of the term -- are real, meaning that there have been things sighted in the sky that can't be positively identified. That's obvious.


Oh come on SGIP,
How can you say that and expect anyone to seriously believe your arguments, when he *clearly* states:



“UFOs are real. The evidence for things flying all over our skies that aren’t ours is overwhelming,”


Anyone, whether skeptic or believer knows exactly what he's saying.

Doesn't mean he's right of course, but that's a different thing entirely. Healthy scepticism is fine and shows rational and analytical thinking. Healthy being the operative word though, shooting yourself in the foot with nonsense and nit-picking doesn't do anyone any favours.

But, up to you of course.



edit on 17/2/2011 by spikey because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 10:13 AM
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reply to post by spikey
 


It the rest of that post and all of my posts thereafter, I also assumed he meant that he thought they were alien-controlled. I only started my post with that particular point.

The main point I'm making is that he doesn't necessarily have any first-hand knowledge of alien visitation, so his opinion on this matter is just that -- his personal opinion on this matter. Many people from all walks of life (including U.S. military officers) have a personal belief in alien visitation, and they may have been of that opinion even before they became military officers -- that is, they didn't "learn secret information about aliens" through their jobs in the military.


edit on 2/17/2011 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 10:15 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 




Careful consideration of the record as it is available to us leads us to conclude that further extensive study of UFOs probably cannot be justified in the expectation that science will be advanced thereby.


How can you interpret the above quote as jiving with Condon 'encouraging' an open mind?!

They say they've studied the phenomena 'carefully' which implies that all available avenues of research had been utilised. The report then says that essentially, more study will not bear any scientific fruit, ergo...researching the subject further is a pointless exercise, that will be wasting scientist's time and resources, and any scientist that actively pursues further study in this area, are essentially wasting time and resources. The donated resources, mind.

'Encouraging' further study - it is not.

If the report had said words to the effect 'We have studies the phenomena to the best of our ability, and have provisionally concluded that although the phenomena appears to be real, we can not find a scientific explanation for it. However, we feel that more study based on contemporary events and reports, as they occur and are reported, may yet be beneficial to the scientific community, in comprehending these phenomena'.

That would be a little more encouraging, wouldn't you agree?

Then the report contradicts itself, by first stating that organisations ought to be able to research the phenomena (that's big of them) without having the piss taken (more or less), but then right away says:



While we do not think at present that anything worthwhile is likely to come of such research each individual case ought to be carefully considered on its own merits.


So, far from 'encouraging' further study as you put it, they are essentially saying:

"Look, we've researched this subject and the conclusion we have reached is that there is nothing of scientific interest to be gleaned from further study. Individual organisations and groups, may perform additional study, but you're going to be wasting your time, and your research organisation's research budget..but if your sponsors don't mind you wasting the money they give for research, then we feel they shouldn't ridicule you for your pointless pursuits"..

IOW...any mainstream scientist who wished to research this phenomena, will be lucky to scrape together the research funding to 'study' UFO's, provided they don't get run out of the scientific establishment first for 'fringe' research efforts.

No mate, the Condon report is a whitewash, a clever use of psychology and rhetoric designed not to encourage further research, but rather the opposite, to stifle any possible meaningful, funded and organised research.

By the way...welcome back.
edit on 17/2/2011 by spikey because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 10:19 AM
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Originally posted by spikey
...By the way...welcome back.

Phage is not back (as far as I know). This was an old thread that someone re-opened.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 

OK, fair enough.

But wouldn't you concede that an Army Colonel, with years of service and experience and obviously privy to sensitive and secret information (in respect of military intel) would probably be more in the 'know' about these things than say, you or I?

I'm not saying that simply being an Army Colonel automatically equals knowing all things there are to know, just that it's more likely someone in an organisation such as the Army, Navy or Air Force, particularly at that rank, would move in circles and make contacts that would cause him to be exposed to a greater intelligence base than that of a civilian say.

As i say, i'm not saying he's right about what he says, only that he would be better placed than many civilian researchers, to discover any information regarding UFO's.



posted on Feb, 17 2011 @ 10:31 AM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People

Originally posted by spikey
...By the way...welcome back.

Phage is not back (as far as I know). This was an old thread that someone re-opened.


Really?

That's odd...the post wasn't a cut 'n' paste of a previous post, it looks as though it was posted by him personally.

The post is at the top of this page, have a look...it looks to me like it came from Phage...if it didn't, i'd be interested who's using his membership account to post in his name.

Certainly looks like his writing style to me.

Thanks for letting me know anyway.







 
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