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Could this be it? This week.

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posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 08:20 PM
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The web bot boys said last Dec. or early Jan. that the bottom would fall out of the stock market around Jan.26...interesting. They also said the US will announce the country is bankrupt by summer, that's why the reference of "the summer of hell" was introduced. Don't worry, all this needs to happen if we want to get rid of the Federal Reserve for good!




posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 08:23 PM
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I think what ever/ if any credit the webbot had on these forums and with the people here went right out the window with thier botched twin EQ predictions. Lets not stumble into the webbot nonsense again. I'm more inclined to believe aliens are involved in this stock market crash over the vailidity of the webbot program.


my 2c on that failure of a program.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 02:32 AM
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- Rising unemployment (Could and WILL lead to civil unrest)
- Bailouts that will lead to massive inflation
- Possibility of another terrorist attack (Will most likely be nuclear)
- Possibility of civil war
- An increasingly dumbed down population that DOESN'T read AKA sheep.



You are guessing when you say unemployment will lead to civil unrest. You are also guessing when you say bailouts WILL lead to massive inflation.

Nuclear terrorist attack? How? You are really reaching here.

Civil war - a possibility that only many here are predicting / want. Don't know why so many want wars and disaster, but they do. That's a looong way off.

And finally, you like so many others, don't give enough credit to other people. I'm about sick of the sheeple comment. The assumption that everyone except the few educational and aware elite (snicker) have a clue what is going on. Underestimation of other humans is a trait that makes me weary. People are apparently too stupid to know the difference between a plane and a missile hitting the Pentagon, in the same way they are too dump to figure out what's going on in our country. A few may be a bit out of touch, but I'd say it balances out for those who dive off the deep end, assuming every single thing that happens has an ulterior motive, or is driven by the super secret NWO.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 03:12 AM
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Originally posted by JediK
- Bailouts that will lead to massive inflation

Bailouts don't lead to massive inflation
. They skyrocket public debt.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 12:42 PM
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Originally posted by Vojvoda

Originally posted by JediK
- Bailouts that will lead to massive inflation

Bailouts don't lead to massive inflation
. They skyrocket public debt.


Bailouts wouldn't lead to massive inflation... IF the money used in the bailout was money that had already been in circulation prior to said bailout. PRINTING buttloads of new currency to use in these bailouts and then using it leads to massive inflation.

It is the simplest application of scarcity & value... the more scarce something is, the more value it has, conversely, the more abundant it is, the less it is worth.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


While volatile "market fluctuations" are indeed based on fear & greed, market trends are based on fundamentals. In this vein, the dollar is setting-up for a major move. I'll let the reader speculate on direction.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 05:26 PM
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Originally posted by burdman30ott6

Originally posted by Vojvoda

Originally posted by JediK
- Bailouts that will lead to massive inflation

Bailouts don't lead to massive inflation
. They skyrocket public debt.


Bailouts wouldn't lead to massive inflation... IF the money used in the bailout was money that had already been in circulation prior to said bailout. PRINTING buttloads of new currency to use in these bailouts and then using it leads to massive inflation.

It is the simplest application of scarcity & value... the more scarce something is, the more value it has, conversely, the more abundant it is, the less it is worth.


But the scarcity is artificially manipulated to raise the prices or lower the prices depending on the companies needs. There's this grand illusion that there isn't enough "stuff"...but there is, they just don't want us to know that so we keep paying ridiculous prices for these things.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 05:26 PM
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Double Post, please remove Mods...

Sorry.

[edit on 1/26/2009 by tothetenthpower]



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 05:29 PM
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Originally posted by tothetenthpower
What people fail to realize about these supposed market fluctuations, is that they're all based on FEAR, just like everything else is.

These numbers are artificially placed there by the people who run things to make sure that we follow the leader into accepting whatever "bail out" packages these people come up with in order to keep the businesses that got us into this mess, continue to reap profits from our hard labor.

There is enough of EVERTHING in the world, the only thing holding us back is competition, so long as we have a million different companies making the same product and pretending that there isn't enough to go around, or that they're product is better, there will ALWAYS be a crisis.

People need to work together, to create companies that work for the best interest of the people, no the product.

Lets remember, 97% of the USA's money isn't material, its computerized. Numbers in a computer are extremely easy to manipulate for anybody's gain.


tothemthepower, I wish they'd print this on the front page of the financial times.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 06:24 PM
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Originally posted by fleabit

And finally, you like so many others, don't give enough credit to other people. I'm about sick of the sheeple comment. The assumption that everyone except the few educational and aware elite (snicker) have a clue what is going on. Underestimation of other humans is a trait that makes me weary.


If those other humans were the lazy, beer-guzzling fatasses that watch TV all day, then underestimating them doesn't make me weary.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 06:36 PM
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Originally posted by hotbakedtater
I have read online that Caterpillar is making digging machines for the moon. Could that be why they are making a profit? Isn't construction down? Or do they have more products that construction equipment(besides the space stuff)?

I think I may invest in a couple of those stocks, esp McDonald's.



Caterpillar just had layoffs today. Now McDonald's, thats a good bet. They had seen a small boost in sales since the fall. People are eating cheap.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 06:44 PM
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Originally posted by Sonya610

Originally posted by hotbakedtater
I have read online that Caterpillar is making digging machines for the moon. Could that be why they are making a profit? Isn't construction down? Or do they have more products that construction equipment(besides the space stuff)?

I think I may invest in a couple of those stocks, esp McDonald's.



Caterpillar just had layoffs today. Now McDonald's, thats a good bet. They had seen a small boost in sales since the fall. People are eating cheap.



You mean people are eating HORRIBLE! hahaha



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 11:27 AM
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Yea McDonald's is so awful for you, I haven't had it since I was a kid.

In the horrible economy, I think people are going to fall back on comfort food, and cheap food, so it might be wise to invest in McDonald's.



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 12:11 PM
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What I don't understand is why the market sees so many layoffs and negative returns or at least slowdowns, and when one company shows some kink of positive spin the market will jump up a hundred points. Currently we see reporting on the worst consumer confidence ever and the market is up. Can some one explain this anomaly to me?

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 01:34 PM
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I saw the talk about Caterpiller and thought it would be helpful to post a bit about a bit of the discussion I had with my dad who works at one of their plants in the Midwest.

He says that they've cut back already on all overtime, perks (steaks for safety that sort of thing), and really importantly, raises. My father was the only one in his department to get a raise, and it was only because he really put himself out there and the supervisors noticed how important he was to the efficiency bottom line.

Also he said that it currently too $350,000 of sales a day to keep the plant running, bare minimum to keep working (nothing was said about making a profit) and they are currently at around $370,000-$390,000. There were other indications of hardship as there was also talk of cutting the gains sharing that him and his fellow employees get (in other words their bonus) every quarter. They got it for the last one, but it is still on the block for this one.

Also a lot of the people there are buffing up their resumes since if people get laid off, it'd be the ones that have been there the shortest first and work their way up. So we could see a lot of rather inexperienced folk dumped on the labor market if they start to shave jobs. I wonder if this is playing in other industries as well?
-------------------------
As for the economic collapse portion of the thread. We've stepped in it good, and with all due respect to the poster who posted it, having another downturn similar to Japan would have been a miracle. The dumping of additional funds of any sort is only damaging the economy more. I'm already finding that the US government made the similar mistake in 1837 when they started to deposit vast sums that were made off of land sales in order to shore up banks that were near collapse cause they had to buy specie to pay back loans to Europe. This was at a time when the US was on the fiat paper currency, and not specie backed. So even though the money that the banks had was there on the balance sheet, it wasn't worth anything to them since it wasn't backed by gold/silver. We've hit a similar snag in that we're flooding the banks with government backed debt cash in order to try and squash the bad mortgage debt, the banks can't use the debt cash to pay off the loan securities around the world cause in this case charging one credit card to another doesn't work.

The only option left when we find this doesn't work will be bankruptcy. Boy will that go over well....



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by reluctantpawn
What I don't understand is why the market sees so many layoffs and negative returns or at least slowdowns, and when one company shows some kink of positive spin the market will jump up a hundred points. Currently we see reporting on the worst consumer confidence ever and the market is up. Can some one explain this anomaly to me?


I wasn't paying close attention to equities this morning, but I'll offer my POV.

Both the S&P, and the DJIA opened with a partial gap-up, ie..opened higher than the previous day' close, but lower than the previous day' high. Gaps are usually news driven, but this morning I think it was market insiders reacting to U.S. Steel and American Express positive profits reporting.

Market expectations have been hammered to the point where even terrible news, as long as it outperforms previous estimates, is traded as good news. The market is forward looking, so it's possible that most of the bad news was already discounted. This might explain why the broad reaction to consumer confidence was so resilient. When a down market rallies on bad news, it can mark a "bottom", or an interim bottom.

Occasionally I suspect it's the Exchange Stabilization Fund determined to hold a line in the sand...currently DJIA 8000 for example.

GL

Edit: Today's action was just more chop on mediocre volume...far from a break-out to new highs.




[edit on 27-1-2009 by OBE1]



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