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Ok to listen to the radio do I need a chemsuite

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posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 09:41 AM
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If I'm within 1.4 miles of a radio emitting device such as a radio or television do i need a chemsuite. I don't want high doses of electromagnetic radiation over extended periods of time.




posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 09:52 AM
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Depends on the channel or station.....




posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 09:54 AM
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Okay, first, what is a chemsuite? I quickly googled it, and I take it you're not referring to the software package of that name, used for chemical analysis or something.

Second, radio and TVs are receivers, and don't emit electromagnetic energy, as such. Actually, they do - the CRT (tube) in TVs can emit quite a bit of energy, and I'm sure the speaker magnets in a radio speaker emits some, too. But those energies are fairly localized.

I assume you mean radio and TV transmission towers? Unless you're like 20 feet away, 24 hours a day, I don't think you have very much to worry about. There's lots of conflicting research, though, so you'll probably want to search some more.

I suggest you read about Faraday Cages, which can block electromagnetic energy.



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 10:18 AM
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Nope. Ive been working under a TV tower for two years. Plus your on ground level and the tower is likely 1000 to 2000 feet, with the antenna at the top of the tower. if you sat in or infront of the microwave dish for like 10 hours i bet you could get a pretty good buzz going though...




[edit on 24-1-2009 by drsmooth23]



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 10:24 AM
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Originally posted by Ian McLean
Okay, first, what is a chemsuite? I quickly googled it, and I take it you're not referring to the software package of that name, used for chemical analysis or something.

Second, radio and TVs are receivers, and don't emit electromagnetic energy, as such. Actually, they do - the CRT (tube) in TVs can emit quite a bit of energy, and I'm sure the speaker magnets in a radio speaker emits some, too. But those energies are fairly localized.

I assume you mean radio and TV transmission towers? Unless you're like 20 feet away, 24 hours a day, I don't think you have very much to worry about. There's lots of conflicting research, though, so you'll probably want to search some more.

I suggest you read about Faraday Cages, which can block electromagnetic energy.



tvs emit electromagnit radiation, but gamma rays are also electromagnetic radiation. is says the electromagnetic radiation in television is nontoxic but it doesnt say why. i was wondering because gamma rays travel 1.4 miles and can penetrate almost any surface. i saw a guy years ago driving around in like a flourescent chem suit. thought it was funny. i was just wondering because im learning about the measurement and doses of radiation and thought it was weird because if im killing myself by watching tv then there is a problem



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 10:32 AM
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reply to post by Chem Suite
 


Televisions emit some electromagnetic radiation (after all, light is electromagnetic radiation!). They don't emit gamma rays, though. They do emit some x-rays, but the glass in the CRT tube is leaded to absorb almost all of these. The very small amount that do still get through is very minimal (or so it is said, and studies indicate, of course).

I'd be more worried about television's content and effect on the mind.



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 10:47 AM
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Originally posted by Ian McLean
reply to post by Chem Suite
 


Televisions emit some electromagnetic radiation (after all, light is electromagnetic radiation!). They don't emit gamma rays, though. They do emit some x-rays, but the glass in the CRT tube is leaded to absorb almost all of these. The very small amount that do still get through is very minimal (or so it is said, and studies indicate, of course).

I'd be more worried about television's content and effect on the mind.





[edit on 24-1-2009 by Chem Suite]



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 06:37 PM
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Originally posted by Chem Suite
tvs emit electromagnit radiation, but gamma rays are also electromagnetic radiation. is says the electromagnetic radiation in television is nontoxic but it doesnt say why. i was wondering because gamma rays travel 1.4 miles and can penetrate almost any surface. i saw a guy years ago driving around in like a flourescent chem suit. thought it was funny. i was just wondering because im learning about the measurement and doses of radiation and thought it was weird because if im killing myself by watching tv then there is a problem


Here's why: There is a spectrum of electromagnetic energy. It's ordered by energy level. This happens to correspond inversely to wavelength. Low energy electromagnetic waves have longer wavelengths than higher energy wavelengths, and vice versa.

It goes like this: Radio is the lowest, and can have wavelengths of several miles, even, but we use radio with more reasonable wavelengths, because that determines the size of the antenna we have to use. Next is microwave. It's name is relative to radio; microwaves are quite large and low energy compared to most EM we're used to. Next is infra-red, followed by visible light, in the order you might think: Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Violet. Next is ultraviolet, which is where EM starts having enough energy to damage cells. More energetic than UV is X-ray radiation, which is why exposure has to be so limited. Gamma rays top the EM spectrum, defined as anything more energetic than X-rays.

Note that this is all the amount of energy per photon. Intensity is a different matter. Enough microwaves and you can cook something, similarly, enough IR or even visible light. Enough gamma rays will cook something, but it will take quite a few because they aren't readily absorbed by anything; they tend to punch right through, and they carry enough energy to ionize atoms they hit by knocking electrons off, which damages the molecular structure of things hit by gamma rays.

An old cathode ray TV that you might have works by firing a stream of electrons at phosphors on the back of the screen. While this is similar to the process used to create X-rays, the electrons are lower in energy, and the glass used in TV screens is like an inch thick and heavily leaded (also, the target is phosphors, not gold foil). Any TV that isn't from like the 50s should be perfectly safe to watch from a few feet away, and probably perfectly safe to be right next to.

EDIT: Are you sure you don't mean "Chem Suit" instead of "Chem Suite"? Because the latter would either be some nebulous mix of products or a room, while the former would be something you wear.

[edit on 24-1-2009 by mdiinican]



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