It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Keep Your Eyes To The Sky! (open letter to ATS members)

page: 3
26
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 06:00 PM
link   
reply to post by Mondax
 


It sounds like you saw the International Space Station. To find out the next time you can get a look at it go Heavens Above. You can set it for your location and see the predictions for ISS (and other satellites) passes over your head.




posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 06:10 PM
link   
it wasn't that, im in the Midwest of the US and at the time the space station was over western north Africa. And it was moving west to east

i was in fact a little disappointed to find out it wasn't the space station


[edit on 24-1-2009 by Mondax]



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 06:33 PM
link   
OP, you are so right. We ALL have to watch the skies!

I took my 15 year old daughter outside two nights ago on the driveway, as it was a clear night and the stars were beautiful and the moon was just a slight crescent.

As we stood at the base of the driveway, I spotted an airborne contact 30 degrees off the horizon moving south to north at approximately 250 knots. The contact was at an altitude of approximately 1,500 feet. Triangle/delta shaped with three solid blue lights. I told my daughter "You see that? That's not from our world". As it passed over us, there was no sound at all. The temp was 15F, so I waited for the delay of sound that you typically hear when it is this cold. Nothing. The course was steady and the lights never changed in intensity. Smooth as silk. Not my first sighting, but at least my daughter had the chance to see one.

When I was in the US Navy, I was stationed aboard the USS Stonewall Jackson (SSBN634), a fleet ballistic missile submarine (hence my screen name). We hardly spent any time on the surface during the six patrols I was on, but when we did, the sky was amazing. When you are out at sea, hundreds and thousands of miles away from any man-made illumination, it's like being in a planetarium star show. It was fairly routine to see airborne contacts that changed course in erratic trajectories.

ALWAYS look to the skies. I try at least a few times a week to watch.....and I'm never disappointed.



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 06:48 PM
link   
I've been an avid skywatcher/stargazer since a kid. Unfortunately, now I work midnights, so needless to say my skywatching is greatly curtailed. Although it is a treat to occasionally see military flights overhead. Saw an F-16 the other day, pretty cool.



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 06:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by StonyJ

As we stood at the base of the driveway, I spotted an airborne contact 30 degrees off the horizon moving south to north at approximately 250 knots. The contact was at an altitude of approximately 1,500 feet.


The trouble with your observation is that in order to get values other than bearing and elevation you have to make some assumptions. To guess at 250 knots you have to have an idea of the distance. To guess at the altitude you have to have an idea of the size and distance of the object.

If you know the size of an object you can make a reasonable guess at its distance from you but without that you have nothing to base the other values on. If you assume the object is large you will assume it is distant and moving fast. If you assume the object is small you will assume it is close and moving slowly.

[edit on 1/24/2009 by Phage]



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 09:18 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 



Maybe I neglected to include the further details to my observation, as I was NOT posting a UFO observation, but a general post reflecting how gazing at the night sky can harvest many sightings.

The object was approximately 120 feet wide and 150 feet in length. The intitial range was approximately 6,000 yards downrange.

When I was in the Navy as a lookout on my first two patrols, I observed hundreds of both surface and aerial contacts. I'm 99% sure of my ability to identify both altitude, trajectory, size and velocity of any and all contacts.

Again, I apologize for not including further details in my first post.



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 09:21 PM
link   
Not to belabor the point, but on what do you base your approximation of the size?



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 09:32 PM
link   

Originally posted by Phage

Not to belabor the point, but on what do you base your approximation of the size?


In keeping with my initial determination of downrange distance, approximate altitude, approximation of velocity, along with visual observation throughout my visual field, I estimated the size to be that of a Boeing 757.

Again, I watch the night sky quite frequently.



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 09:40 PM
link   

Originally posted by StonyJ

Originally posted by Phage

Not to belabor the point, but on what do you base your approximation of the size?


In keeping with my initial determination of downrange distance, approximate altitude, approximation of velocity, along with visual observation throughout my visual field, I estimated the size to be that of a Boeing 757.

Again, I watch the night sky quite frequently.



A circular estimation: estimating distance based on estimated size based on estimated distance.

I too watch the night sky and know that without knowing the separation between points of light it is impossible to estimate their distance. You assumed the separation of the lights to be that of a 757 and based your estimation of distance and altitude upon that assumption.

[edit on 1/24/2009 by Phage]



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 09:46 PM
link   
You make a valid point, friend.

All I have is experience in indentifying targets/objects over many years. My observations were accurate. They might not have been perfect, but they were accurate, which I think leaves a little leeway.



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 10:28 PM
link   
Great post OP.

I just came in from a -15 degree (Ontario, Canada) freezing cold session with my telescope and Orions Nebula (M42). The cold sky is crystal clear but the street lights and vibrations on my 4th floor balcony add a lot of fuzziness to my eyepiece.

I urge anyone interested in astrology to download "Stellarium" a free open source star finding program for any OS. You just type in your location and bam there you go. It even gives the co-ordinates for your telescopes azimuth/altitude if you're so inclined to use it.

Saturn should be high enough for me to distinguish it from my cities haze within the hour, unfortunately my camera is only able to take pictures of the moon due to its limited exposure lengths.

Peace and happy stargazing.




[edit on 24-1-2009 by TheRealDonPedros]



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 11:10 PM
link   
Indeed, keep your eyes to the sky!

My name is Glenn Corpe. I have uncovered nasas lies and brought the moon into public light for the first time since the ancients walked the earth.
I am sorry I have not released any data on this site for I have sent the data to credible sources to view and verify first. I hope you will forgive me for that.
But worry not for all this data will be free for the whole world to view soon enough.
You will all be amazed at what those in positions of power and influence have been keeping from us all.

Stay tuned, its going to be a wild and exciting journey.


Sincerely
Glenn Corpe

Australia



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 11:12 PM
link   
I just saw Saturn for the first time. It was hard to keep it in my view as it kept on flying down and to the left, Orion's Nebula was much easier to keep centered. I tried viewing at 175X but the resolution was terrible and it was shaking like crazy so I bumped it down to 112X and I saw the rings and one moon below it and to the left.

Ive still got my gear setup outside but it is freezing out tonight, I don't know how much more I can handle without another tea.

Peace



posted on Jan, 24 2009 @ 11:14 PM
link   
reply to post by TheRealDonPedros
 

The trouble with Saturn? It looks like a cheesy special effect.
That was my first impression, and still is. It just can't be real, even though it's right there in front of me.

(I know it is. It just doesn't look like it.)

[edit on 1/24/2009 by Phage]



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 05:02 AM
link   
reply to post by cluckerspud
 


Lot's of stars for you


I love this thread one of the best I've participated in yet, everyone questioning and helping, no hate, apart from one deleted post

TheRealDonPedros: lucky you man, I take It your using a telescope, your not in the north east of England are you??? hahah peace ya'll



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 05:14 AM
link   
reply to post by Pockets i have alway's looked up at the sky, when i was a teen i was teased for it, i was embarressed and stopped for a while but now when i look back i think "how stupid was i?", i look at the sky all the time now, in the winter the stars seem crisper and clearer but it's almost too cold. one day i will have an open ceiling
 



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 05:17 AM
link   
reply to post by echodogene
 


Never give into bully's man, teased for looking at the sky, the place we come from, kids think they know everything but most know nothing, never give into bully's or people who question you



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 09:08 AM
link   
My kids and I go outside and sit in the dark and watch the sky just about every weekend. We live near several airforce and army bases so the show is usually pretty good. they bring out their newest toys around one in the morning. The area seems to be a hotbed for ufo activity we are rarely disappointed. I kinda doubt everything we see is military some of it is chasing the military planes. some of it just moves to fast and changes direction to quickly.

Phage believe it or not some people can gauge things quite well with just their eyes. Being in construction most of my life I can see something that's " out of plumb" when others can't . I know other people that can measure without the need of a tape measure all it takes is practice.



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 10:30 AM
link   

Originally posted by pipefitter
Phage believe it or not some people can gauge things quite well with just their eyes. Being in construction most of my life I can see something that's " out of plumb" when others can't . I know other people that can measure without the need of a tape measure all it takes is practice.


Apples and oranges...

and most people do not understand this.

On the ground, and in daylight, our eyes/brains use visual cues to judge distance/perspective etc.

When looking at objects in the sky at night, we no longer have the same visual cues that our brains/eyes are used to. Under conditions like this, as Phage has explained, it's impossible to judge distance, size, or speed with any accuracy.

Assumptions based on the apparent brightness/size of a light are never valid under such conditions, since the actual brightness is unknown and depending on distance, a very bright light could a long way away, but look exactly like a relatively dim light that's very close to the observer. It's quite easy to demonstrate this at night with a torch and a couple of other lights of different brightness, carefully placed at different distances, so that to the observer, they appear to be the same brightness, and therefore at the same distance. There's no way to tell just by looking. No amount of experience can overcome this.



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 11:08 AM
link   

Originally posted by pipefitter


Phage believe it or not some people can gauge things quite well with just their eyes. Being in construction most of my life I can see something that's " out of plumb" when others can't . I know other people that can measure without the need of a tape measure all it takes is practice.


I know carpenters who have an incredible eye but they need a reference. If you know you're looking at a 2x4 you can guess it's an 8' stud because you know the board is 1-1/2" x 3-1/2". Now suspend (somehow) that board in the air. Since you know it's a 2x4 you can still get a pretty good idea of its length and distance from you. But what if someone pulled a trick on you and substituted a 4x8x16? Could you tell the difference if you didn't know how far away it was? Most likely you would think it was at half the distance from you because you would assume it was still the 2x4 and base your estimate of its distance on that. Because it's twice as large, it looks twice as close.

I've seen people fooled like this in broad daylight. A 10" balloon, 100' off the ground, became a huge UFO, high in the atmosphere, moving at great speed. Until I pointed out what it really was, then their eyes readjusted and they too saw it was really a balloon.

Judging plumb (or any angle) is a different situation. Your body is the reference. You can feel when your body is plumb and you can see when something is not vertical compared to your body. If you are judging an angle (like 30º above the horizon) you have a reference, the horizon. But an angle by itself does not give you size or distance.


[edit on 1/25/2009 by Phage]



new topics

top topics



 
26
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join