It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Al Qaeda Chief Was Released by U.S. From Gitmo

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 23 2009 @ 11:34 AM
link   

Al Qaeda Chief Was Released by U.S. From Gitmo


www.foxnews.com

A Saudi man who was released from Guantanamo after spending six years inside the U.S. prison camp has joined Al Qaeda's branch in Yemen and is now the terror group's No. 2 in the country, according to a purported Internet statement from Al Qaeda.

The announcement, made this week on a Web site commonly used by militants, came as President Barack Obama ordered the detention facility closed within a year.

"The lesson here is, whoever receives former Guantánamo detainees needs to keep a close eye on them," an American official told the New York Times.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jan, 23 2009 @ 11:34 AM
link   
This is a tough one for me. Most of you who read any of my posts will know my stance on the torturing of people to gather so called 'intel'. It just doesn't work.

However, this guy is now purportedly the #2 guy in Yemen.

I guess there are a few different ways to view this.

One, and a very good possibility, the guy NEVER was a terrorist, never had any intentions or leanings to be one, but, after being held for 6 years without a trial or evidence, he decided to turn to that lifestyle out of spite to get back at the evil American Empire.

Two, he really was guilty in the first place but we didn't have enough evidence to hold him here so we transferred him back to his home country. Who also seemed to not have enough evidence to hold him. This sucks because they shouldn't have taken him in the first place until they HAD that rock solid evidence.

It's a dangerous game. I realize that it's tough to figure out who is bad and who is good. The problem is that we simply cannot go about collecting human beings, subject them to torture and mistreatment for 6 years, and expect them to like us. Hell, I would seriously consider getting back at the people that did that to me.

Or, in a completely CT twist, this could be an attempt to block the closing of our Guantanamo base by showing that there are terrorists still out there and that the base is still needed.



www.foxnews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jan, 23 2009 @ 11:55 AM
link   
This is the problem. Our military isn't a police force their job is not to investigate and find evidence to convict people. There job is to wage war and get the job done.

If these people are with terrorist at the time when the military rolls up and detains all of them, then that is enough evidence.

This is war this is not on the streets of America, were if a somebody committed a murder and none of his buddies new about it his buddies go free.

These people are shooting at and blowing up our troops. Them just being with the terrorist is enough evidence at the time for them to detain them and get them off the battle field.

War is not pretty and war is not just, it is war and you do what you have to in order to save lives and if that means detaining somebody because they were in the wrong place at the wrong time with the wrong people then that is what it is.

War sucks and innocents get caught up in it. Just the way it is and nothing is going to change that.



posted on Jan, 23 2009 @ 12:11 PM
link   
This is true, the military released him, not the U.S. judicial system, however, in the instances of the other detainees they will be put through a process, categorized on order of the charges if any, in some instances some of the detainees were captured and may have not even been taking place in battle or terrorism, only in the wrong place and wrong time, it is problematic for the U.S. to continue holding anyone for no real evidence or reason.



posted on Jan, 23 2009 @ 12:19 PM
link   



posted on Jan, 23 2009 @ 12:29 PM
link   
reply to post by dariousg
 


If I were to make any observation on this it wouldn't be the piece of news itself but its purpose. And with that said its my belief is that this is nothing short of TPTB attempting to implant seeds of doubt in those who wish to shut down Gitmo



Originally posted by dariousg


I replied to the OP and didn't see your following post until now but I agree completely.


[edit on 23-1-2009 by C0le]



posted on Jan, 23 2009 @ 12:32 PM
link   
From all the posts that I've seen on this site I thought that all the people imprisoned in Gitmo were innocent peace loving muslims.

They were somehow illegally detained and had never done anything that they should be held accountable for.

All charges were trumped up.

'
'

I'm so glad that GITMO will be closing soon.



posted on Jan, 23 2009 @ 12:35 PM
link   
Beat me to it C0le, my thought exactly.

Obama wants to close Gitmo and, whaddya know, a story telling how someone they released is now a big cheese in AQ.

Of course, it's always possible that those perfectly innocent people they have held for so many years would want to seek revenge.



posted on Jan, 23 2009 @ 12:37 PM
link   

Originally posted by dariousg


This is a tough one for me. Most of you who read any of my posts will know my stance on the torturing of people to gather so called 'intel'. It just doesn't work.

However, this guy is now purportedly the #2 guy in Yemen.

I guess there are a few different ways to view this.

One, and a very good possibility, the guy NEVER was a terrorist, never had any intentions or leanings to be one, but, after being held for 6 years without a trial or evidence, he decided to turn to that lifestyle out of spite to get back at the evil American Empire.



This is the one I'm going with right here.

To be honest, I have seen good people turned bad by being imprisoned for something they didn't do too many times.

Sorry, just the way things go.



posted on Jan, 23 2009 @ 12:38 PM
link   
reply to post by dariousg
 


Here's something else to take into consideration-

There are different standards and burdens of proof for someone being held either for intel purposes or due to intel on them, than in a criminal/civil trial(i.e. you don't need search warrants, Miranda rights given, etc....). There are plenty of folks in Gitmo, that are guilty as hell, but due to the methods used to ascertain this prior to capture, wouldn't be admissable(i.e. you caught them before they did something, not having to establish motive, etc..).



posted on Jan, 23 2009 @ 12:39 PM
link   
Existing thread here:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Please add further comments to the ongoing discussion.
Thank you







-thread closed-



for future reference:
Search ATS



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join