It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Mysterious Rumble Vexes Sequoyah County

page: 9
49
<< 6  7  8    10  11 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 08:46 PM
link   


The chief interest of Persius's work lies in its relation to Roman satire, in its interpretation of Roman Stoicism, and in its use of the Latin tongue. The influence of Horace on Persius can, in spite of the silence of the Life, hardly have been less than that of Lucilius. Not only characters, as noted above, but whole phrases, thoughts and situations come direct from him. The resemblance only emphasizes the difference between the caricaturist of Stoicism and its preacher. Persius strikes the highest note that Roman satire reached; in earnestness and moral purpose he rises far superior to the political rancour or good natured persiflage of his predecessors and the rhetorical indignation of Juvenal. From him we learn how that philosophy could work on minds that still preserved the depth and purity of the old Roman gravitas. Some of the parallel passages in the works of Persius and Seneca are very close, and cannot be explained by assuming the use of a common source. Like Seneca, Persius censures the style of the day, and imitates it. Indeed in some of its worst failings, straining of expression, excess of detail, exaggeration, he outbids Seneca, whilst the obscurity, which makes his little book of not seven hundred lines so difficult to read and is in no way due to great depth of thought, compares poorly with the terse clearness of the Epistolae morales. A curious contrast to this tendency is presented by his free use of "popular" words. As of Plato, so of Persius we hear that he emulated Sophron; the authority is a late one (Lydus, De mag. I.41), but we can at least recognize in the scene that opens Sat. 3. kinship with such work as Theocritus' Adoniazusae and the Mimes of Herodas.





Persius's satires are composed in hexameters, except for the scazons of the short prologue above referred to, in which he half ironically asserts that he writes to earn his bread, not because he is inspired. The first satire censures the literary tastes of the day as a reflection of the decadence of the national morals. The theme of Seneca's 114th letter is similar. The description of the recitator and the literary twaddlers after dinner is vividly natural, but an interesting passage which cites specimens of smooth versification and the languishing style is greatly spoiled by the difficulty of appreciating the points involved and indeed of distributing the dialogue (a not uncommon crux in Persius). The remaining satires handle in order (2) the question as to what we may justly ask of the gods (cf. Plato's second Alcibiades), (3) the importance of having a definite aim in life, (4) the necessity of self-knowledge for public men (cf. Plato's first Alcibiades), (5) the Stoic doctrine of liberty (introduced by generous allusions to Cornutus' teaching), and (6) the proper use of money.





The Life tells us that the Satires were not left complete; some lines were taken (presumably by Cornutus or Bassus) from the end of the work so that it might be quasi finitus. This perhaps means that a sentence in which Persius had left a line imperfect, or a paragraph which he had not completed, had to be omitted. The same authority says that Cornutus definitely blacked out an offensive allusion to the emperor's literary taste, and that we owe to him the reading of the manuscripts in Sat. i.121,--"auriculas asini quis non (for Mida rex ) habet!" Traces of lack of revision are, however, still visible; cf. e.g. v.176 (sudden transition from ambition to superstition) and vi.37 (where criticism of Greek doctores has nothing to do with the context). The parallels to passages of Horace and Seneca are recorded in the commentaries: in view of what the Life says about Lucan, the verbal resemblance of Sat. iii.3 to Phars. x.163 is interesting. Examples of bold language or metaphor: i.25, rupto iecore exierit caprificus, 60, linguae quantum sitiat canis; iii.42, intus palleat, 81, silentia rodunt; v.92, ueteres auiae de pulmone reuello. Passages like iii.87, 100 sqq. show elaboration carried beyond the rules of good taste. "Popular" words: baro, cerdo, ebullire, glutto, lallare, mamma, muttire, obba, palpo, scloppus. Fine lines, etc., in i.116 sqq., ii.6 sqq., 61 sqq., 73 sqq., iii.39 sqq.


Why does mankind 'edit' the Truth unto another?

For whoms Benefit?

You take from your Brethren You ultimately take from yourself.

What is this 'fascination' with the Chronicles of Atlantis?

Where does it come from and what is preventing you from achieving that which you hold in your heart to be true?

And population reduction is left best in the hands of One with true 'Authority' to wave that 'Invisible hand of Justice'.

You are Free to Choose.

What time is it?

May it Not be too late.

May Peace and Understanding Prevail.

The Chosen One, the Messiah is within you all by Divine 'design'.

All one has to do is "Listen" to it.

This is my last wish.



[edit on 25-1-2009 by Perseus Apex]




posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 09:14 PM
link   
wow
some great input since my last read through.

Not sure what point Perseus Apex is trying to make in his cryptic posts with regards to this topic.....

Jay... what makes you so sure that it is NOT underground. I agree that it is beginning to seem more atmospheric in nature but I would not rule out underground activity. What is tilting your opinions to the atmospheric side?



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 09:55 PM
link   
This is really interesting.

I live in Tulsa county, not far at all from this, and have heard nothing at all about it. Odd!

I do wonder though if it could explain my dog acting like there is a thunderstorm approaching at random times over the last few weeks. Maybe she can hear something I can't.



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 10:00 PM
link   
reply to post by SleeplessInUS
 


Well, I still haven't seen any data to suggest any seismic activity occuring with the event. If it were blasting or drilling or even the theorized underground super-sonic train, there would be evidence of it on the seismographs.

I think whatever it is, it is carrying down the river-valley through the atmosphere.
Good thread you created, btw. First one even! Great success.



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 10:06 PM
link   
www.scribd.com...


I just found this it mentions many undergroumd tunnels in Oklahoma as well as all over the world used by NWO and Aliens and loud banging noises before heard in Oklahoma. Dont know if i believe it or not but, here you go...



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 10:09 PM
link   
There is another very weird atmospheric occurance in this area, also.

Check out the tornadic and severe thunderstorm activity in this area. Especially around Poteau, Oklahoma. Crazy!

It is because of that damned hill. Poteau is the "world's largest hill"... And yeah, it is a big one. Anyhow, atmospheric anomalies don't surprise me in this area.



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 11:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by Jay-in-AR
reply to post by SleeplessInUS
 


Well, I still haven't seen any data to suggest any seismic activity occuring with the event. If it were blasting or drilling or even the theorized underground super-sonic train, there would be evidence of it on the seismographs.

I think whatever it is, it is carrying down the river-valley through the atmosphere.
Good thread you created, btw. First one even! Great success.


Thanks for the kudos, appreciated.

I remember reading and posting in the beginning that the USGS stated that there was activity registering but it was not seismic. Would atmospheric anomolies cause activity readings with the USGS?



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 11:11 PM
link   
reply to post by SleeplessInUS
 


Oh, they certainly COULD. I mean, sonic booms are atmospheric and they definately register on seismos. People have reported their entire houses shaking because of them.



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 11:25 PM
link   
reply to post by sugrbare03
 


Interesting read. Although I think that information may be embelished some and a little "out there" ... i do think that these things tend to come from grains of truth. It would be interesting to see if these underground caverns exist.

Thanks for the link. I copied the portion that pertained to the area in question if anyone would like me to post the snippet.



posted on Jan, 25 2009 @ 11:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by Jay-in-AR
reply to post by SleeplessInUS
 


Oh, they certainly COULD. I mean, sonic booms are atmospheric and they definately register on seismos. People have reported their entire houses shaking because of them.



of course... what was I thinking LOL. I do hear the rattle of the windows in relation to sonic booms.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 11:47 AM
link   
reply to post by SleeplessInUS
 


Talked to a coworker who used to live in McAlester. She heard booms possibly from the ammunition plant, but it was never on a regular basis. Im interested that the USGS knows, but doesn't know, about the atmospheric conditions that could be causing the occurence.

From the NRC report on the reclamation of the SFC plant.

"1.6.1 Cooperating Agencies
The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) in 10 CFR 1508.5 defines a cooperating agency asa federal, state, or local agency or tribal government that has jurisdiction by law or special expertise with respect to any environmental impact involved in a proposal. The NRC, the EPA, USACE, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the ODEQ, and the Cherokee Nation have an interest in the proposed reclamation of the SFC site. Because the interests of these agencies are interrelated on this project, and these agencies have jurisdiction by law or special expertise pertinent to potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed reclamation of the SFC site, the EPA, USACE, USGS, ODEQ, and the Cherokee Nation have agreed to cooperate with the NRC in the preparation of this EIS."



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 09:16 PM
link   
reply to post by Jay-in-AR
 


Yes sir, traveled the 'scenic byway' from stem to stern many times.

Done the dirt roads down the sides too.
Looking forward to going back this spring.

THX for the info on the switching yards, must have missed them. I'll be keeping a keen ear open during my visit this spring.


Originally posted by SleeplessInUS
Not sure what point Perseus Apex is trying to make in his cryptic posts with regards to this topic.....


Do yourself a favor and put PA on ignore. Pure psychobabble.


Originally posted by gluetrap
This is really interesting.

I live in Tulsa county, not far at all from this, and have heard nothing at all about it. Odd!

I do wonder though if it could explain my dog acting like there is a thunderstorm approaching at random times over the last few weeks. Maybe she can hear something I can't.


That's a great bit of input. It would be very valuable for you to record the times and dates of your dog's reactions, and compare them to peoples reports of the 'booms'.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 09:25 PM
link   
reply to post by resistor
 


For the life of me I can't remember... Ah, nevermind... Rich Mountain. We just finished an engineering project where we designed a waterline to go up to the Lodge at the top from a farm 5 miles South of there.

That was the worst land survey I've ever done! I love it down there, but jeeze, those are some pretty treacherous lands down there. More copperheads and rattlesnakes than I can shake a stick at. Saw several bear, also. And one Cougar.

But yeah, it is really nice down there. That stretch of highway is incredible.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 09:36 PM
link   
reply to post by Jay-in-AR
 


There's a lodge at the top of Rich Mountain? I had no idea. Sure you're not thinking of the Queen Wilhelmina lodge?

And in 10 years of camping in the deepest regions of the Ouachita Forest, I've seen not one viper, cat or bear. I realize that they're there though. Hell, we've got cougar in north Texas. Very rare though. The park service people always call the footprints bobcat so that they don’t have to put up with the endangered species crap.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 09:44 PM
link   
Yes, Queen Wilhelmina Lodge sits atop Rich Mountain. www.queenwilhelmina.com... The Waterline I spoke of comes right up to the back end of the lodge. From about six miles away.

I'm surprised you haven't at least seen the rattlesnakes having camped there. However, we took a route straight through the middle of the forest and we were not able to stick to the trails. At times we were pulling a chain through there and when you do that, you have no choice to walk straight ahead, no matter what is in your path. I encountered at least 4 rattlesnakes in one day once. Three pigmies and one diamondback. The bear are more prevalent along the highways in the early morning hours. Try driving that biway just after dawn. Maybe you'll have more luck with the bears.
I carried a piece on me.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 10:05 PM
link   
reply to post by Jay-in-AR
 


No S! I thought that Rich Mountain was closer to Mena. From the reading I had done, I thought that RM was named from the rich growing soil on it. Not what I've seen in the QW lodge area. Cool forestry tower just to the east though. Have you seen the pioneer graveyard nearby? One story is that one of the young girls was killed by wolves.



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 10:13 PM
link   
Yes sir. I was actually just looking for pictures I took. I snapped some up close photos of the tower as a reference point for the photos I took at the beginning of the waterline. Awesome scenery. And yeah, I hiked down to the cemetary.
I'd also bet a nickle I've travelled those same dirt roads you spoke of. There is one that goes down next to a radio tower just west of the lodge a ways. That is a cool road. Takes FOREVER to get to the bottom of the mountain from there.

But yeah, that is Rich Mountain. It actually has a little significance itself. It is the only mountain in Arkansas that is taller than Mt. Magazine. But it is only taller on the Oklahoma side of the border. There is one butte in far Western Oklahoma that stands taller than Rich Mountain, but not by much.
...
So, Rich Mountain is left out of the "tallest" lists for both states. Pretty impressive, though. And it is one LONG son of a gun. It stretches a good 15 miles from one side to the other.

And as far as the "rich soil" goes
I've never seen a rockier place in my life. That mountain, and those around it, are covered in a Geological feature called "rock glaciers"... Basically what it is is that at one point in time a glacier made it that far south and melted. Depositing the rocks all over the place. There are boulder fields all over the place. But I'm sure you've seen those.

[edit on 26-1-2009 by Jay-in-AR]



posted on Jan, 26 2009 @ 10:58 PM
link   
reply to post by resistor
 


Resistor, Do not jump to hasty & biased conclusions about others so that you not be similarly judged.



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 05:26 PM
link   
I am from Berlin/Germany and i've heard a big boom like a huge explosion maybe 3 nights before and the one after that too...it was around 3.30 cet and i thought "man, they are bringing down the whole block somewhere in the distance..." Someone else here from Berlin to confirm this?



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 09:03 PM
link   
reply to post by Jay-in-AR
 


I actually haven't done any of the dirt roads on the AR side. I'll have to make that a point this spring. Having gone back and found the source that said that RM was so named for it's rich soil, it turns out to be a real estate site.
No wonder I thought is was further east.


Originally posted by Perseus Apex
reply to post by resistor
 


Resistor, Do not jump to hasty & biased conclusions about others so that you not be similarly judged.


Oh brother!

Being wrongly judged is not something I worry about. It's something I've lived with for 40 years.



new topics

top topics



 
49
<< 6  7  8    10  11 >>

log in

join