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WOW check out Austrailias UV index

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posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 08:52 PM
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Here is a link to Australia's UV index

www.bom.gov.au...
It's of the scale




posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 08:58 PM
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Wow that is pretty crazy!! Thanks for the heads up. Do you check on this quite a bit or you just happened to come across it. I would like to know the average out there.

-Kdial1



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by foremanator
 


Good news for Lizards
Guess thats why there is so many native to
Austraila.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 09:05 PM
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No I have been on this "kick" lately. That most of the worlds environmental problems are some how related to the massive rise in UV emissions.

For instance. The disappearing honeybees.

We recreated what a flower would look like to a bee, based on studies that show bees have different colour capabilities than humans. Bees see ultra-violet colour as well as blue and green, while humans see a mix of blue, green, and red colours." Dr Dyer said.

Many flowers have evolved ultraviolet reflecting pigments, so that whilst a flower from the Australian Native plant Caroline Jessamine appears completely yellow to our eyes, bees can see this as a two colored flower.


The massive rise in Australian skin cancer
ca.youtube.com...
Here is a link to my thread
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 10:10 PM
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It's been very obvious there's something up with the atmosphere over these past two weeks. It's been blisteringly hot here in Sydney, but it's a different kind of heat than I've ever experienced. It's like a flash-frying all-encompassing heat...like an oven set on high-heat.

I noticed the other day when I went out for lunch that the parts of my body exposed yet in the shade were just as hot as portions facing the sun - now that's odd. I've also noticed over the past few years that it's becoming much easier to tell which portions of skin are in the sun and which are in the shade (without looking). Holding my hand in partial light & shade, I can trace a line where the light ends and darkness begins with my eyes closed.

Additionally, the colour temperature of the sunlight is alot more blue than it used to be. When I was first studying photography 10 years ago (when film was standard), the colour temp for the Sun was set as an orange/white (I forget what degree Kelvin it was...). Anyway it was an unchanging amount, however I find that my outdoor white balance settings aren't up to the task anymore - the result is noticeably blue.

I'm surprised that this hasn't been mentioned officially in the photographic & scientific realms, rather than in just passing conversation.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 10:22 PM
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reply to post by Evasius
 

Wow That is interesting
I am going to check that out.
Thanks for the input


[edit on 21-1-2009 by foremanator]



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 10:31 PM
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reply to post by foremanator
 


I've surfed for close to 20 years now and traveled around the globe to many, many tropical destinations. While I haven't been to Australia in about 15 some odd , the ABSOLUTE worst sunburn of my life was while I was in Australia. I'm not stupid and always used sunscreen due to the obvious risks, but the best way to explain the difference to other "burns" I've had, is that I felt "cooked" from the inside out. Not only that, but the burn took much longer to heal.

My take was that it was due to the hole in the ozone layer allowing more UV rays through than in other places I've been.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 10:35 PM
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Originally posted by surfinguru
reply to post by foremanator
 


My take was that it was due to the hole in the ozone layer allowing more UV rays through than in other places I've been.



"We recreated what a flower would look like to a bee, based on studies that show bees have different colour capabilities than humans. Bees see ultra-violet colour as well as blue and green, while humans see a mix of blue, green, and red colours." Dr Dyer said.

Many flowers have evolved ultraviolet reflecting pigments, so that whilst a flower from the Australian Native plant Caroline Jessamine appears completely yellow to our eyes, bees can see this as a two colored flower.

Disappearing honey bees?



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 10:37 PM
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wow, the whole map of the whole country is in the extreme zone. A person could get a dark tan in 5 minutes I would think. Does the UV index also help out with solar power?



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 10:38 PM
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(sarcastically..) Ah don't worry about it, it's just another mythical side effect of our approaching the galactic equinox, our solar systems alignment with the galactic plane, and the mythical effects of the gravitational wave that will be effecting the Earth as we pass through it which will bringing about the mythical end of current times.
Seriously, it's all just a hallucination, nothing to worry about here either. Please resume your normal lives and ignore all the accumulating evidence.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 10:57 PM
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Here in Perth we broke records last week, for 15 days over 35oC
Marble Bar in WA's north had 160consecutive days.

Thats almost 100oF



Last week we had 2-3 days around the 38-41oC mark.

At 9am, it was 35oC, it was 27oC in the night.

Yet this morning, I woke up it was cold and raining.

Weathers changing, all those who doubt it should spend a summer down under


[edit on 21-1-2009 by Agit8dChop]



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 11:11 PM
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I am on the central coast of NSW and today it is overcast like it is going to rain, it is windy...warm and gusty, the temperature is hot. The house is relatively cool due to being mostly tiled so this keeps the interior temp a little lower.

Do any other Aussies think that the nights are uncomfortably hot on the east coast?

I have to keep a fan going all night in the bedroom with the window wide open; we lock the security doors but keep the doors open to create a breezeway.

The humidity must be very high too as it is really sticky



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 11:32 PM
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reply to post by foremanator
 


have you really questioned why Australias Skin cancer is on the rise.

I live in Cairns, a very hot part of the world.
I worked on boats for years along with many other people, now I wore shorts and a shirt. very brown legs and arms, If I go outside to do gardening and take off my shirt, my back will burn, my stomache will burn, my arms and legs stay the same, Why?
because they arn't exposed to as much sunlight and don't have as much resistence.
If you work in an office and only get into the sun on weekends, you will do far more damage to your body and increase the chance of skin cancer.
very few people I know have had to get skin cancers removed from working on the water, and those who did had them removed from areas that where normally covered by their shirts. I knew more people who worked in offices that had to get skin cancers removed.

Most people now work in an office, the only chance to get any sunlight is on the weekend where they lay in the sun for hours, burning.
This is why the statistics are on the rise.



posted on Jan, 22 2009 @ 01:43 AM
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The recent spate of hot weather here is not actually unusual, & some of us that are a bit older than 40 well remember the summer school holidays that were extremely hot....with days & days over 35C, then followed by storms & floods. Many a school holiday was spent down the beach, in the pool, or under the sprinkler in an attempt just to keep cool.

Nothing unusual here, its just that "global warming" has become topical & people out there are looking for supposed "unusual weather".

The UV in southern Australia has been forecast for many years now on the local News, in the summer months, & we have been warned to apply sunscreen & protect our skin for a very long time now.

Any other Aussies out there remember the original "Slip Slop Slap" commercials from the Anti Cancer Council, in the 70"s & 80"s? I certainly do.



posted on Jan, 22 2009 @ 01:54 AM
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It has been damn hot in Western Sydney in particular. Last year we didn't have a day over 35C, this year we have already had many (just passed half way) including at least 3 in the 40s.

I heard the radio in my car, and some people called saying their temp gauge said 48C!
And I definitely agree on the heat, it does appear very different.

By the way, February is our hottest month of the year.



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