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US Airways Flight 1549

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posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 05:46 PM
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Something is not right about this thing.
1. They say 1/10000 flights are hit by birds every year. By my calculator the odds are 1/100,000,000 of both engines being taken out. Not impossible but a long shot.
2. The flight reached 3200 feet maximum. Do Geese fly at that height? Maybe over the mountains, but they were at the coast.
3. Where is this captain guy. Sequestered, kinda feels like incarcerated. What's up with that. If it were me, I would charge them with false imprisonment. We have this thing called Habeas corpus in America.
I can't put my finger on it, but something is not right about this.
Anyone else out there see something odd. Set me straight, tell me why I am wrong.




posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by kdeery
 


1/20.000

Two birds. The probability should be doubled.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 07:01 PM
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reply to post by kdeery
 


Could it be that the pilot, a retired aging pilot, maybe having been recruited for a suicide mission, no return... family will be compensated dearly for his sacrifice.

Only this guy decides that now is not his time. So, using his excellent military piloting skills he saves the day. Now, sequestered because they do not know what he'll say publicly, they are in a dilemma...

My 2cents



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 07:11 PM
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There were 80 THOUSAND bird strikes in roughly 20 years. Bird strikes are a constant thing going on. The big difference here is that a bird strike hasn't taken down a commercial flight in a very long time.

Geese fly much higher than people realize. Birds have been seen flying at 29,000 feet when migrating. Buzzards and hawks have been known to routinely soar at 10,000 feet to get a better view of prey.

As for the pilot being "sequestered" the crews are asked not to talk to the media until after the NTSB is completely done interviewing them. They were asked by the ALPA not to talk to the media yet, and they agreed. That's why they haven't talked to anyone yet. The Captain was scheduled to be on Good Morning America on Monday, when the ALPA asked him to postpone it.

There's nothing suspicious here.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 11:15 PM
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"By my calculations", geese fly in flocks in a formation, so if you hit one goose it's damn likely you're going to hit them all. It's not like two birds hitting two engines are unrelated random occurances. Considering these birds are often about 15 lbs, no shock to see why they would take out a plane engine when something like a seagull may not.



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