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Monitoring Internet Usage

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posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 08:20 AM
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Does anyone know exactly to what extent our government's (UK,US) monitor personal and business Internet usage?

Is there anywhere on the net that outlines exactly what they are/are not allowed to snoop into and that gives general but accurate advice on this sort of thing?

I've heard all sorts of things like if you type "Assassinate the President" or "Mein Kampf" for example into a search engine it will flag up somewhere and is a trigger for them to start monitoring your usage???

Is this true, does anyone have any definite answers or is it all speculation?




posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 09:19 AM
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It seems both prudent and logical to monitor communications which you might find suspect of presenting a threat to national security.

The question should be, who they think is a threat and why?



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 09:21 AM
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Originally posted by Maxmars
It seems both prudent and logical to monitor communications which you might find suspect of presenting a threat to national security.

The question should be, who they think is a threat and why?


I Dont disagree at all, I am wondering in more general terms though. Do they monitor all the time and who? What are they looking for?

Is this business about "trigger words" true?



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 09:30 AM
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reply to post by 0010110011101
 


Actually, in theory YES. Several "crawler" type programs have been instituted (it's on record) to automatically signal potentially targetable content for the intelligence and law enforcement communities. (Echelon comes to mind as an example).

However, it is hard to believe that those charged with pursuing such things would waste their time on casual remarks or innocent questions.



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 09:44 AM
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This is an easy question to answer.

There are many laws regarding the US Patriot Act. The US Patriot Act was passed after the terrorist attack on America occurred on 9-11. Since the original Act was passed, numerous addendum's and revisions have been passed since. Wiki has a decent tracking of these revisions and add-ons. You would ultimately want to read all laws that pertain to the Patriot Act.

One good resource for a basic rundown of US Patriot Act can be found on the ACLU. Here is their pdf rundown on the Patriot Act for a quicker read.

Another great resource interpretation can be found on the life and liberty website.

Here on ATS there have been many threads started covering just this one subject. Here is just 1 out of many threads on the Patriot Act.

Here is the Patriot Act in full text for you to read.

By definition, the Patriot Act, section 802 classifies terrorism as:

‘‘(5) the term ‘domestic terrorism’ means activities that—
‘‘(A) involve acts dangerous to human life that are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State;
‘‘(B) appear to be intended—
‘‘(i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population;
‘‘(ii) to influence the policy of a government by
intimidation or coercion; or
‘‘(iii) to affect the conduct of a government by
mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping; and
‘‘(C) occur primarily within the territorial jurisdiction
of the United States.’’.

Interpreted:
Part (A) - any act dangerous to human life and violates criminal laws. This can be speeding as you are endangering other drivers on the road and you are breaking the speed limit laws. It just depends if they really want to get you they can pull this trump card and haul you away under the Patriot Act.

Basically, under the name of patriotism on battling terrorism. They can do anything they want to do. The laws are written in a way it does not outline specifics on what they can or cannot do. They are written to where it is left up to interpretation. This gives them ultimate power and authority. Unless I am mistaken and the Patriot Act has changed since I last read it. If suspected of terrorism activities, they can pull up in unmarked vans, kidnap you, take you to a remote location, they do not have to tell your family, interrogate you for "as long as it takes" (could be years if they really don't like you), seize everything you own.



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 09:49 AM
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Project Echelon

What is Echelon?

based in the UK, monitors ALL electronic communications.



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 10:11 AM
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Originally posted by Amaxium
If suspected of terrorism activities, they can pull up in unmarked vans, kidnap you, take you to a remote location, they do not have to tell your family, interrogate you for "as long as it takes" (could be years if they really don't like you), seize everything you own.


Thanks for your response........and for the info that was proided on ECHELON.

Reference your last paragraph, my understanding of the British Judicial System is slightly different. For example a vote was taken last summer in the House of Commons on the detention of terrorist suspects and they voted a 42 day detention without trial through. However they couldn't get it on the statute books and it was dropped from the counter terrorism bill before Christmas.

But you're telling me in the states; if they SUSPECT you of some sort of terrorist offence or links with any sort or terrorist organisation they can detain you indefinitely without letting anyone know they've got you?!?!?! Does this only apply to terrorism or do they have this right ad infinitum?

Habeas Corpus anyone? Jeez.

[edit on 20/1/2009 by 0010110011101]



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by 0010110011101
 


As I see it, anyone who may have more knowledge regarding current Patriot Act powers please feel free to chime in and correct me if I am incorrect, they do have exactly that power. In the name of freedom and protecting freedom, they can hold you as long as it takes to extract the truth from you. By letting others know where you are or what has happened to you may in fact trigger an act against freedom to be implemented by the suspected terrorist's accomplices (if they are indeed a terrorist). This is why they will not tell others of your circumstances. They will do anything possible if it prevents another terrorist attack. If one were to occur, we do not want to find out that that terrorist was previously picked up and interrogated and then released prior to such a catastrophe. The problem has always been weeding out who is and is not a terrorist as they come in many shapes and forms and it is often not known they are terrorist until such a catastrophic event occurs.



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 12:05 PM
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A good movie has just come out over here (UK)

Shoot On Sight
IMDB Link

which looks at the problems of terrorism in the UK.. A well made movie and worth a viewing.. Roughly based on Jean Charles Menedez shooting (forgive me if name is spelt wrong)



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 10:32 AM
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Originally posted by UKWO1Phot
A good movie has just come out over here (UK)

Shoot On Sight
IMDB Link

which looks at the problems of terrorism in the UK.. A well made movie and worth a viewing.. Roughly based on Jean Charles Menedez shooting (forgive me if name is spelt wrong)


There's a programme on ITV1 (UK) tonight called "Stockwell" which is about the aforementioned incident too! Had good reveiews for those in the UK.....



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 01:44 PM
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Here is another thread which has a perfect example of the law enforcement abusing the US Patriot Act.

ATS Thread

Watch out what you do while inside an airport or airplane.




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