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Supernova Speculations - What do you think?

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posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 06:03 PM
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3 years ago Hubble telescope was aimed at a spot eight billion light years from earth, when a mysterious very bright light appeared and brightened for 100 days before it gradually dimmed again for another 100 days and vanished. To this day scientists dont know what the source of the light was but they think it might be a unknown type of supernova. Although Hubble was focused 8 billion light years away scientist say this lights origin could have been as close as within our own Milky way galaxy.

Mystery light.


There is a very likely possibility that the Mammoths and many other species in N. America were killed by the aftermath of a supernova that exploded approximately 250 light years from earth and the initial shockwave impact came 7000 years after it exploded travelling at an estimated 10,000km per second.

Were the mammoths killed by a supernova?


If the light Hubble spotted was a supernova within our galaxy, we will get a shockwave impact from it after 10,000-100,000 years possibly killing of some species (if there are any left). The light could also have been way further away and we will never feel the shockwave from it.

What if the ancients saw a supernova maybe 7000 years ago like the Chinese spotted 2000 years ago and its shockwave is still on its way. Would we be able to detect it before it actually hit us, or would it just come in the form of surprise? Would we maybe detect a loud roar in space before the impact?

Was the Betlehem star a supernova? What do you think?




posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 06:07 PM
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Well the thing about is that it is 8 billion light years away. That means that it occured 8 billion years ago. So that star went supernova a very long time ago...in a galaxy far far away...


Nothing to worry about. If Hubble picks up a supernova in our own galaxy, it is not going to affect us....unless it just so happens to be that one star we all depend on...called Sol.



Cheers!!!!



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 06:17 PM
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reply to post by RFBurns
 


Did you actually read the whole post? Im not worried at all about the mystery light, I just think it is interesting that it could be a new type of supernova. Also the article clearly states that it could have been within our galaxy although Hubble was focused 8 billion light years away. But the chances of that are slim.

Supernovas certainly are killers but life on earth has survived few of those in the past. Question is will mankind be so lucky? Will we even know its coming and be ready?



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 06:56 PM
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Regarding the chinese observation of a supernova, we now see it as the crab nebula at a distance of 6500 light years, and take a look at this APOD link, and you will see that the blast shockwave is spread to some light years, but the energy will dissipitate soon.

crab nebula



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 06:58 PM
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reply to post by Waldy
 


It is not supposed to be a new type of supernova, because astronomers have encountered them before, and this is different.



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 07:08 PM
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Interesting theory Waldy!

Although, our current understanding of the supernova is that it occurs at the eventual 'collapse' of a black hole at the centre of a galaxy. So if this explosion of light occured someohow close to ours, or our solar system rather, we would need to explain what a rogue black hole was doing floating about in the middle of nowhere and what gave it extra mass to go over the threshold.

Perhaps, due to the fact that Hubble was not directly focused on this 'flash', it is difficult to gauge where it is coming from?



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 07:17 PM
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Originally posted by The_Modulus
Interesting theory Waldy!

Although, our current understanding of the supernova is that it occurs at the eventual 'collapse' of a black hole at the centre of a galaxy. ?


You are wrong, dear friend, a supernova is the collapse of a star which cannot hold itself together, and it occurs not only near the center of galaxy, but anywhere.

Take a look at this link,

supernova



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 07:29 PM
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I'm not much of an astronomy buff, but isn't there supposed to be a black hole at the centre of all galaxies? (correct me if I'm wrong)

Also what would be the major effect (or first effect) if we received a blast?
Gamma rays, then searing heat?



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 07:29 PM
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Originally posted by peacejet
You are wrong, dear friend, a supernova is the collapse of a star which cannot hold itself together, and it occurs not only near the center of galaxy, but anywhere.


Aah, my apologies, I was going to check that fact before I posted but decided to trust my intuition


Well, if it is a nearby star, it wouldn't be too difficult to scan the sky to see whats missing. I'm not sure what distance such an event would need to be before it could possibly have any effect on our solar system.



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 07:30 PM
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reply to post by The_Modulus
 


Actually there are several types of supernova, none are the product of a black hole, although one is the run up to a black hole. Its where the stars core collapses in on itself and sheds its outer layers rather violently.


EDIT: Ahhh, beaten too it, lol.

[edit on 19-1-2009 by derangedinsanity]



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 07:36 PM
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Originally posted by UKWO1Phot
I'm not much of an astronomy buff, but isn't there supposed to be a black hole at the centre of all galaxies? (correct me if I'm wrong)

Also what would be the major effect (or first effect) if we received a blast?
Gamma rays, then searing heat?


Yes, there are black holes at the center of every galaxy. And luckily the black hole in our galaxy is dormant for the current time, and some astronomers have seen gas building up near the edges of it, and so, the activity might start again any time soon, but we need not worry about the gamma rays as we are at a safe distance from the center.



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 07:40 PM
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Originally posted by The_Modulus
Well, if it is a nearby star, it wouldn't be too difficult to scan the sky to see whats missing. I'm not sure what distance such an event would need to be before it could possibly have any effect on our solar system.


Well it seems even astronomers have no idea regarding the distance of this light.


Hubble was aimed at a cluster of galaxies 8 billion light-years away in the spring constellation Bootes. But the mystery object could be anywhere in between, even in the halo of our own Milky Way galaxy.


Hubblesite link-

hubblesite

And dont worry about the effect on us, the nearest star is 4 light years away and even if it exploded, the shockwave will lost energy by the time it reaches us.



[edit on January 19th, 2009 by peacejet]



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 03:19 AM
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Thats not entirely correct, in fact you are dead wrong on that. If we had a supernova within 10 light years, the solar system would probably be wiped out.

Supernovas have caused mass extinction on this planet before, the last known supernova event is linked to the extinction of the mammoths and several other species in N. America, read the article in the OP.

The mass extinction event occured 450m years ago and is referred to as the Ordovician–Silurian extinction event where 50% of multicellular organisms were wiped off the planet.

What if there was a supernova event 7000 years ago approximately 250 light years away and the shockwave from that blast was travelling towards our solarsystem, would we be able to detect it before it hit us at 10,000km per second?



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 03:26 AM
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reply to post by Waldy
 


I think the Chinese spotted a conjunction between Venus and Jupiter...

As did the fabled 3 wise men...


Remember the big smiley face in the sky recently???

Well that was the same conjunction.



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 03:39 AM
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reply to post by JimmyBlonde
 


Nope, read the link. They saw the formation of the crab nebula, it was almost as bright as the moon.



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 03:42 AM
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Originally posted by Waldy

What if there was a supernova event 7000 years ago approximately 250 light years away and the shockwave from that blast was travelling towards our solarsystem, would we be able to detect it before it hit us at 10,000km per second?

I was bored. According to calculations the wave wouldn't hit for another 500 years.
1 LY=9,460,730,472,580.8 km
Seconds in a year= 31,536,000
Wave would travel 315,360,000,000 km per year
Shockwaves impact on earth at a distance of 250 LY at 10,000 km/sec=7,499.9448825 Years after the event.

Yes I was bored.

[edit on 1/20/2009 by ShAuNmAn-X]



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 03:47 AM
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reply to post by ShAuNmAn-X
 


Hehe, nice one. However, the 10,000km per second is the impact velocity, it would be travelling a lot faster right after the explosion and then gradually slow down.



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 03:53 AM
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reply to post by Waldy
 

What do you think the mean velocity of the shockwave would be? 10,000 km per second is the only value I can base it on. If I had a concrete value for the initial velocity I could be more specific but that depends on the severity of the explosion.



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 03:56 AM
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reply to post by ShAuNmAn-X
 


According to Wikipedia the explosion velocity can be up to 1/10 of the speed of light.



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 04:14 AM
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reply to post by Waldy
 


using 1/10c (29,979.2458 km/sec) I've revised the numbers
The mean velocity of the shockwave would be 19,989.6229 km/sec
The wave would travel 630,824,523,629.04 km in one year
The wave would travel 1 LY every 26.219754625955746223182279092958 years
Estimated impact time at 250 LY at19,989.6229 km/sec mean velocity=6554.9386564889365557955697732375 years

The wave would have hit Earth around 450 years ago.



[edit on 1/20/2009 by ShAuNmAn-X]



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