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Could the removal of the moon destroy our planet?

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posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by franspeakfree
 


The moon does draw hits away from the Earth by meteors. Without the moon, the Earth would be the target. There are also many biological reasons for the moon as stated above. We do need Luna.




posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 02:02 PM
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I was just wondering today what would happen if the moon was destroyed. I thought, that if a large planet-killing rock came by, and our gravity pulled it in, it still might pass us. But what if it hit the moon and sent it flying out into space. Would it completely tear us from our orbit?

I would think that is a problem that has been discussed before.



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 06:25 PM
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Originally posted by kidflash2008
reply to post by franspeakfree
 


The moon does draw hits away from the Earth by meteors. Without the moon, the Earth would be the target. There are also many biological reasons for the moon as stated above. We do need Luna.


While true, there's considerably fewer large rogue bodies flying about the solar system than there once were. The moon bears the scars of such impacts. Considering only asteroids, though, the earth would probably make do; billions of years of collisions have taken their toll on unincorporated bodies and so there's very little out there. Also, the moon, after all, doesn't cover much of the sky. it only deflects a percentage of impactors, probably far less than half.


Originally posted by SantaClaus
I was just wondering today what would happen if the moon was destroyed. I thought, that if a large planet-killing rock came by, and our gravity pulled it in, it still might pass us. But what if it hit the moon and sent it flying out into space. Would it completely tear us from our orbit?

I would think that is a problem that has been discussed before.


If something like that hit the moon, it wouldn't be "sent flying out into space". It would be utterly obliterated. The earth's surface would be scoured of recognizable features by trillions of tons of falling rock. The earth would remain in nearly the same orbit, but as a burnt, lifeless, rock probably devoid of atmosphere and oceans.

You can't just bump a celestial body with a big rock and change it's direction. Consider how much they mass. To move that much mass, you need a lot of energy. Enough energy to pretty much shatter a planet, if you try to do anything signifigant all in one go.



posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 08:47 PM
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reply to post by franspeakfree
 


Simple. The earth would just start spinning in the other direction.

Venus is practically Earth's twin. It has no moon and it rotates in the opposite direction.

Venus


If viewed from above the Sun's north pole, all of the planets are orbiting in a counter-clockwise direction; but while most planets also rotate counter-clockwise, Venus rotates clockwise in "retrograde" rotation. The question of how Venus came to have a slow, retrograde rotation was a major puzzle for scientists when the planet's rotation period was first measured.



Mercury (3030 mi/4880 km), Venus (7500 mi/12100 km), Earth (7926 mi/12756 km), Mars (4222 mi/6794 km)

Exchange our moon with Mars in the above picture and you have similar twins. For a comparison, the moon's size is 2160 mi/3476 km. On the surface the moon and Mercury resemble each other in appearance.

I have a feeling Mercury was ripped from Venus' orbit ages ago.



posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 11:42 PM
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The rotational wobble of the Earth on its axis is maintained by the moon and procures climate change. The moon keeps our weather patterns in motion, and without its presence there would be an increased frequency of ice ages and warming periods. (Not to mention the havoc on the migratory patterns of every organism and loss of tidal activity...that has all been covered)
At this time in our solar system's history, we are in the last quarter of a sustainable scenario for most lifeforms on Earth. (Granted, this is over 1.2 million years and none of us will be around to see the initial effects of solar expansion) Perhaps, though, the future humanoid life-forms inhabiting this planet will have developed a method of towing the Earth away from the sun; however, this scenario seems unlikely. One would assume the methods of interstellar system travel will evolve first and a more suitable home found for any 'refugees.'
I haven't seen an answer, though, to the meaning of this 'vision.' I, too, have experienced a few dreams of the moon being destroyed and would like to get some input regarding the interpretation.



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 12:11 AM
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correction: 1.2 billion years from now when the sun begins its expansion



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 02:56 AM
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reply to post by franspeakfree
 


the mere removal / disapeance of the moon would have almost zero effect on the planet

the application of a external force powerfull enough to radically affect the moons orbit / remove it ect - would have a significant effect

the planet does not NEED tides etc - but marine life and birds do

venus has no moon - and copes just fine



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