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Wild sources of sugar or sweeteners?

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posted on Jan, 16 2009 @ 11:41 AM
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I know you can reduce sap from various trees into a crude sugar, but does anyone know of any other sources of sugar or other natural sweeteners?

I don't think many people how much sugar we really consume on a daily basis. You could say we're addicted to it, and we crave it when we have any for a while.

[edit on 16-1-2009 by bsbray11]




posted on Jan, 16 2009 @ 12:15 PM
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There is the 'Miracle Berry' that makes sour food taste sweet! Few internet sources sell it though. I was planning to procure some seeds.

What you do, is take the berry before you eat bland or sour food... and it'll taste sweet!



[edit on 16-1-2009 by star in a jar]



posted on Jan, 16 2009 @ 12:20 PM
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Sugar Beet.

The huge refineries in Cambridgeshire stink something awful. Check your bags of sugar next time you're out. There's a good chance it's no longer cane-sugar.



posted on Jan, 16 2009 @ 12:30 PM
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Sugarcane, abundant in tropical regions.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jan, 16 2009 @ 12:36 PM
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reply to post by Nirgal
 


Sugar beets are actually a great crop either in small production or larger multi family type setting if SHTF.

The tops are great for livestock feed and the beets themselves keep for up to a year in cold storage. They are a 60-90 day crop and easy to grow from seed.

Extracting the beet syrup is as easy as boiling the beets and reducing the liquid to a thick syrup. it does have a bit of a taste of it's own but it's earthy and could be easily masked by other food flavors. They can also be dried and reconstituted.

They are susceptible to certain molds and fungi but crop rotation or companion planting practices can limit that issue.



posted on Jan, 16 2009 @ 12:40 PM
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It doesn't grow wild, but Stevia is used to make sweetener.

Agave Nectar is what I use for all my added sweetener now.



posted on Jan, 16 2009 @ 12:47 PM
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Honey.


Originally posted by bsbray11
I know you can reduce sap from various trees into a crude sugar, but does anyone know of any other sources of sugar or other natural sweeteners?

I don't think many people how much sugar we really consume on a daily basis. You could say we're addicted to it, and we crave it when we have any for a while.

[edit on 16-1-2009 by bsbray11]



posted on Jan, 16 2009 @ 03:56 PM
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in order for honey to be completely safe it should be pasteurized. This may not be possible or practicle in a SHTF situation and many people are allergic. Honey is also unsafe for young children (so I've heard but not verified).



posted on Jan, 16 2009 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by justgeneric
 


This is somewhat true. Honey should never be given to children younger than 1 year old because of the risk of food contamination/poisoning.

A bigger concern for me is in the collection of honey itself. Barring you obtaining access to a bee keeper suit, I can't think of any way to harvest wild honey that wouldn't involve either killing the bees or getting the daylights stung out of yourself. Considering I and many others are alergic to bees, and that bee alergies are one of those things that you can suddenly acquire after years of having no adverse reaction to previous stings, I'd think twice before suggesting anyone in a survival situation or an area of limited medical care try to harvest their own honey.



posted on Jan, 17 2009 @ 11:39 AM
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Thanks for all the replies. I hadn't thought of sugar beets but that's a good idea, and I'll look into growing stevia or even that "miracle berry" bush. Hopefully they can grow outdoors here, but I guess I'll see.



posted on Jan, 17 2009 @ 12:03 PM
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Stevia is your best bet.
Take care when purchasing, as there are strains better than others.
It does grow wild...well, did grow wild.
Today,it is propagated by root and stem cuttings,and not by seed, as the seeds will vary when planted, typically to the worst.
Been used forever in S.America.
It is good for diabetic persons.

I grew it for a couple of years. Best fresh, eaten plain, like chewing tobacco, or dried, crushed for additives in desserts.
Use for iced tea with other 'leafy' plants.

BS Horticulture.



posted on Jan, 17 2009 @ 09:28 PM
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It is true that honey shouldn't be given to children under 1 yr of age but as far as pasturizing it...it really isn't needed. Honey in itself has many antibacterial and antiseptic properties. That is not a guarentee that the worst couldn't happen but it is not likely. I wouldn't suggest harvesting wild honey either unless you have experience with bees. It is not that bad if you can get over the fear of it. My Grandparents had a small honey house when I was young and it was a great experience working it with them from time to time. Plus, I am a pack rat and a good friend of mine gave me loads of equipment whern his father died and they got out of the honey biz. Will I ever use it? lol I doubt it but it's in the basement if I ever need it.

Stevia is a viable option but was advised against it from a friend that came back from South America. He uses another plant that begins with an X that is supossed to be better for you. I will try to look hom up and get the details. It has been some time since we had the discussion about natural foods (last July) so the details escape me. Someone here shed any light on it?



posted on Jan, 17 2009 @ 09:46 PM
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Originally posted by burdman30ott6
This is somewhat true. Honey should never be given to children younger than 1 year old because of the risk of food contamination/poisoning.

A bigger concern for me is in the collection of honey itself. Barring you obtaining access to a bee keeper suit, I can't think of any way to harvest wild honey that wouldn't involve either killing the bees or getting the daylights stung out of yourself. Considering I and many others are alergic to bees, and that bee alergies are one of those things that you can suddenly acquire after years of having no adverse reaction to previous stings, I'd think twice before suggesting anyone in a survival situation or an area of limited medical care try to harvest their own honey.


See, you just not thinking outside the envelope.

You get the guy that's allergic to bees to harvest the honey. When they sting him and he croaks, it's a big win for your tribe!

You get the honey.

One less mouth to feed.

Hmmmm.....BBQ, anyone? Longpig is on the menu for tonight!

C'mon people, focus!!



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 05:32 PM
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Honey, is great, and as my children are older, no worries


and it does have great antiseptic properties, it was used in ages past to treat battlefield wounds and such.

Also off topic, Like the new avvie Raider, bloody shame everyone latched on to your Guy Fawkes bit.



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 05:33 PM
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As far as harvesting; wet smokey fire at the base of the tree, puts then right to sleep.

2nd line



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