Basic essential tools for your EDC list

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posted on Jan, 14 2009 @ 06:59 AM
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A follow on from the BOb list for folks interested in building EDC kits for themselves, I'm sure many people have much to add or change especially the younger people who know what IPods and Blackburry doofahs are all about ( I dont I can not even work out how to text with a phone)

Bare Essential Every Day Carry list

A very basic guide of essential items for a chap or chapese to carry as their EDC, it does not include professional tools and equipment, cosmetics, nor fashion and feminine hygiene products.

1. Pocket Knife
2. Multi tool
3. Compass
4. LED Flashlight & spare batteries
5. Analogue Watch , Solar or Self Winder
6. Purse / Wallet ( cash, credit card tool, credit cards, ID card)
7. Notebook & Pen & mini Sharpie
8. Eye Glasses, Shades,
9. Bandana / Large Kerchief
10. Length of Paracord and Mini Carabiner
11. Lighter
12. Cell phone
13. Prescription medicines ( Insulin , Migraine tabs, Heart tabs etc)
14. Keys on ring or belt carrier clip

Other items worthy on consideration are a
1. First Aid Kit and Water Puri Tabs
2. A couple of disposable dust masks
3. Micro AM/ FM radio (Ipod radio thingy?)
4. Hat and Gloves for cold weather
5. Monocular
6. Section of Map serving your local area.

PDA’s, Blackburrys, 10 Gram tin of Vaseline, Lip Balm, Baton, CS spray, Diary, Feminine products, eye glasses cleaner, spring loaded centre punch, permanent marker(Sharpie), chemical light sticks, Handgun plus ammo, micro prybar , food bars, small bottle of water, Flash drive stick, pocket digital camera, GPS,
Pain killers, pack away waterproof, Underground tube and bus route map, cycle route and walkways maps. All of the above are recorded as being carried by various people as part of their EDC, obviously many people use bags and packs to carry EDC kit with them.

Again as with the BOB list the EDC list is only the basic starting point for people to work from to develop their own EDC.




posted on Jan, 14 2009 @ 07:41 AM
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May I add something that I think few think of in this modern day and age?

Comfortable, sturdy walking shoes/ boots.

I've seen so many people who work in an office and wear the most ridiculous shoes (looking specifically at ladies). I recently moved offices (to be closer to home) but I used to have to dress up daily. Skeptics, even if you never have to make the trek home on foot, the walking shoes were one of the most useful things I ever kept with me.

[edit on 1/14/2009 by CeltAngel]



posted on Jan, 14 2009 @ 07:56 AM
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Originally posted by CeltAngel
May I add something that I think few think of in this modern day and age?

Comfortable, sturdy walking shoes/ boots.

I've seen so many people who work in an office and wear the most ridiculous shoes (looking specifically at ladies). I recently moved offices (to be closer to home) but I used to have to dress up daily. Skeptics, even if you never have to make the trek home on foot, the walking shoes were one of the most useful things I ever kept with me.

[edit on 1/14/2009 by CeltAngel]


Again a very good point, after 911 and after the power cuts in NYC 2003 there are hundreds of recorded cases of people having to hike up to 12 miles or more in a few cases, in stilettoes, flip flops, sandels and other completely useless footwaer. In the UK when thousands got stranded for 18 hours on the M11 during a snow storm many had to walk home in open toed shoes, high heels, etc. In a ladies magaixine printed in NY a few years ago it reported that lots of office girls now lined the bottom of their bags with sensible walking shoes or trainers.



posted on Jan, 14 2009 @ 11:47 AM
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reply to post by Northern Raider
 


I hear you on the inability to send text messages. I have one of the fanciest phones on the market (provided by employer) I had a hard time just figuring out how to actually make a phone call.

On the EDC list, I think you should move the first aid kit up from the other items worth considering. Something small and light, bandaids, steri strips, asprin, etc...

I actually have found more use for that in my EDC than anything save my multi tool. Also, when you can produce something important while small in a needed situation, it can help start a "prepardness" discussion with others who may have never considered an EDC or even know what it is.

Also to add, if trained and it is legal where you are, add a firearm to your list. Better to have it and not need it.



posted on Jan, 14 2009 @ 02:05 PM
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[

Also to add, if trained and it is legal where you are, add a firearm to your list. Better to have it and not need it.


I remember being introduced by a friend to another survivalist who lived in Oklahoma city, nice guy, said he went no where without his IMI desert eagle in some huge great calibre, Said it was to protect him from wild animals.

I asked just how many Polar Bears, Grizzly Bears, Siberian Tigers, Water Buffalo, and Salt Water Crocodiles lived wild in Oklahoma City


Christ the guy had a 20 degree list with the weight of his side arm hanging off his belt


[edit on 14-1-2009 by Northern Raider]



posted on Jan, 15 2009 @ 10:56 AM
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Ive seen those guys. Never once encountered a polar bear in OKC, and Ive been there a few times.

As an EDC firearm, something small and light, think Ruger LCP, Kahr arms has a few small carry weapons.

Now wandering into the woods, then its time to upgrade to something with more stopping power. However, a dessert eagle? Those things weigh a ton, wouldnt consider carrying one of them.



posted on Jan, 15 2009 @ 12:34 PM
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Originally posted by salchanra
Ive seen those guys. Never once encountered a polar bear in OKC, and Ive been there a few times.

As an EDC firearm, something small and light, think Ruger LCP, Kahr arms has a few small carry weapons.

Now wandering into the woods, then its time to upgrade to something with more stopping power. However, a dessert eagle? Those things weigh a ton, wouldnt consider carrying one of them.


I'll stay old fashioned and carry a 9 mm when I am in the United states of Haliburton, if 15 rounds of 9 mm wadcutter wont put a beast down I give up


[edit on 15-1-2009 by Northern Raider]



posted on Sep, 3 2009 @ 03:25 PM
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reply to post by Northern Raider
 


Great thread.

Personally I would make a first aid kit an essential item - I'd even encourage people to have something beyond a a basic first aid kit - Like dressings that can cope with heavy bleeding and some sterile sutures (butterfly and threaded needle) you never know when you're going to have to deal with that kind of problem be it in the field or in an urban environment.






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