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Basic essential tools for your BOB

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posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 12:43 PM
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dainoyfb---nice arrowheads, have you tried firing those from a hand made bow and arrow? Curious as to accuracy as well as penetration. If even mildly successful, that is a great idea for a BOB or a BOL.

Nirgal----This is a question that comes up alot regarding BOB's. If it is grabbed and you are not planning on coming back. Alone, and what you will need. The answer isnt simple, at least thats what Ive seen.

First question is, do you have a BOL (bug out location for the new guy). If so, that should be well stocked, then you can easily streamline your bag. Just the essentials to get you where you are going. Simple, light, and fast. Keep gear to a minimum, and constantly look for new gear that is smaller and lighter than what you have.

If you dont have a place that is stocked up, and your bag is essentially your possesions for a day, a week, year, forever, then you run into a new set of guidelines. It is going to be heavier, thats a fact, you will need more stuff with you. Look for items that have duel purposes to minimize overall items and weight, look for the lightest yet durable items you can find to stuff your pack with. Lexan is great, but long term I would want titanium. Of course, look for things you think you need, but can do without until you learn how to create it from the wild. Why carry a water bottle and a cup when they serve the same function and one can readily carve cups in the wild. That sort of thing. Most importantly, always be looking to learn how to do it yourself instead of relying on gear, easiest way to lighten your load.




posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by salchanra
 


Excellent points, particularly about the multi-use items. I keep thinking, "I want this knife or this axe or this knife too, it would be useful for x."

Then I remind myself I have a 12" and a 14" khukri. One of these would quite happily perform myriad functions.

The stash locations is a good idea. Some of my food is already at another location, unfortunately it's in an urban setting. The only plus is I'm the only person that knows the contents of the boxes.



posted on Jan, 19 2009 @ 05:50 PM
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Yes, they shoot pretty decent. I modeled them from popular expert designs and these are a second revision with minor improvements. I'm happy to provide the AutoCad file if you want to get some cut. It cost me less than $1.00 each including material for small quantities because I just gave the laser shop the file so there were no drafting charges. The material is the same that is used for cutting custom license plate covers so many laser shops will have it in stock. Be aware that if you plan on using these for a knife you will have to put an edge on them. I've worked in a professional sharpening shop so its not a problem for me but if your not used to what can go wrong then you may end up with an arrow head that has 2 very uneven spade sizes which may cause poor flight performance. Also, stainless steel is a lot tougher than regular mild steel so it is a lot of work to grind and sharpen each head. Expect a tedious workout.

Oh yeah, Not liable for damages, or injures, to h ddfmk jjfvmfgl, div. of Ricky Bobby Inc. Shake and Bake!



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 02:12 PM
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reply to post by Northern Raider
 


Coolio, I'm in Co. Durham aswell


10 lines



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 02:20 PM
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Originally posted by Pockets
reply to post by Northern Raider
 


Coolio, I'm in Co. Durham aswell


10 lines


Neat we will have to meet up for coffee or a pint sometime, I'm still contemplating challenging the Brit contingent to have a bug out / social event/ navigating contest/ speed reaction test. one weekend.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 02:32 PM
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Originally posted by Nirgal
Oh man. the big smoke was wet this morning as well. Ended up with a wet foot all day due to faulty steelies.


Back on subject though...

I have one issue with my BOB. I figure that if I ever need to use it then there's a pretty good chance I won't be returning.

So here's the thing, if you have to travel solo and cannot share the load what criteria would you employ for streamlining?

E.g. My SAS handbook would be essential because I don't have that knowledge in my head yet. Most of the contents will be used for living rough.

Guess I'll just have to man-up and work out more!


Go CEFO or Recce order the way soldiers used to if they had to move out quickly and abandon their logistical support chain.

3 layer clothing, say
helly hanson UB armour vest,
Norgie,
Hoody Fleece,
Bandana or Buff
fingerless gloves
rolled up goretex or ventile waterproof jacket and pants fastened with bungy to top of belt order.
boots.
PST, FSK and FAK in jacket pockets, plus compass, flashlight, spr batteries, micro radio. Lock knife, multi tool, binos
58 pattern belt order with waterbottle, filter straw and steel 58 pattern mug.
Micro cooker plus rats
Hygiene kit
small hand towel in kidney pouches
Pocho or bivvy bag rolled up and fastened to bottom of belt order.

Everything close to hand
Hands left free to carry weapon or climb

Any desired extras like more grub, changes of clothes, extra ammo etc in small rucksack on your back that you can drop if ambushed.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 03:24 PM
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I look for things that have more than one use. Some of those crank powered radios have a lot of features.

Midland XT511 Base Camp Two Way / Emergency Crank Radio
www.buytwowayradios.com...

Like that one there. It's features: AM/FM Radio, NOAA Weather Radio, 22 Channel 2-way radio, Alarm clock, Flashlight, USB Connector (USB can be used to charge many modern cell phones and mp3 players)

All that, just for turning a crank. And if the radios stop broadcasting and you just want some music, RCA makes a nice mp3 player that's splash resistant, rubber coated for protection, and even plays video (albeit on a very small screen.) I don't have a link, but I know they sell them at Wal-Mart. They have models that hold up to 4 gigabytes - at least a thousand songs - and they charge by USB cable so they'd work with that radio. It's not such a bad gadget for fighting off boredom.

Multi-tools have some darn handy gadgets on them, also. One multi-tool can replace several items in your pack, saving space and weight. The tools tend to be larger than what you'd find on a Swiss Army Knife, so I prefer multi-tools over the famous red gizmos.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 11:32 PM
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The contents of a BOB are not easily enumerated. It all depends upon one's individual circumstances. I, for example, work in a city 25 miles away from my semi-rural home, which is 200 miles away from my refuge of last resort. My BOB in the trunk of my car at work is going to contain what I'm likely to need to get home, whereas my 4wd at home is going to contain what I need to get to (destination undisclosed), which in turn is mostly pre-stocked with necessary goods.

The point - a BOB must be custom-tailored to the user. Don't take any list too seriously and make sure that your BOB fits your circumstances.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 11:36 PM
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And cycle its contents! Things like batteries, food, certain first aid supplies, medicine, and stored water often have shelf lives. I raid my disaster kit quite frequently (always being sure not to let it run completely out, of course,) and then replace what I took at the first possible chance.

After all, if you don't find yourself needing it from time to time, it probably isn't important enough to drag around in the first place.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 11:51 PM
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on the subject of arrow heads :

if they are just for small game - they do not even have to be sharp - or even have a head at all

a heavy blunt arrow can get results

all it has to do is stop the victim from fleeing for the 2 / 3 seconds it takes you to close the distance and neck it

never done it with rabbit or such - but a mate regularly hunts willd duck with a catapult and ball bearings he salvages from the scrap skip at his works



posted on Jan, 22 2009 @ 02:18 PM
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Originally posted by Northern Raider

Originally posted by Pockets
reply to post by Northern Raider
 


Coolio, I'm in Co. Durham aswell


10 lines


Neat we will have to meet up for coffee or a pint sometime, I'm still contemplating challenging the Brit contingent to have a bug out / social event/ navigating contest/ speed reaction test. one weekend.


Come to the south and I'm in.
mind you, I wonder if the authorities would be interested. ???



posted on Jan, 22 2009 @ 02:20 PM
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Originally posted by mattifikation
I look for things that have more than one use. Some of those crank powered radios have a lot of features.

Midland XT511 Base Camp Two Way / Emergency Crank Radio
www.buytwowayradios.com...

Like that one there. It's features: AM/FM Radio, NOAA Weather Radio, 22 Channel 2-way radio, Alarm clock, Flashlight, USB Connector (USB can be used to charge many modern cell phones and mp3 players)

All that, just for turning a crank. And if the radios stop broadcasting and you just want some music, RCA makes a nice mp3 player that's splash resistant, rubber coated for protection, and even plays video (albeit on a very small screen.) I don't have a link, but I know they sell them at Wal-Mart. They have models that hold up to 4 gigabytes - at least a thousand songs - and they charge by USB cable so they'd work with that radio. It's not such a bad gadget for fighting off boredom.

Multi-tools have some darn handy gadgets on them, also. One multi-tool can replace several items in your pack, saving space and weight. The tools tend to be larger than what you'd find on a Swiss Army Knife, so I prefer multi-tools over the famous red gizmos.


That Radio find is top draw friend.
I had my eyes on one crank radio with charger etc, but I may change my mind with what I have just seen.



posted on Jan, 22 2009 @ 02:45 PM
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Some might say it is way too heavy and cumbersome, but I recommend carrying a full sized car or truck door. If it gets too hot, you can roll down the window.




posted on Jan, 22 2009 @ 02:59 PM
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reply to post by colec156
 


Colec,

About a year ago my crank radio was wiped out, I picked up a FR 500 Solarlink. No regrets at all, will always have a place in my BOB, or as NR mentioned, I should be buying another one for a Faraday cage.

Anyways, good luck in getting a radio, very much worth the cost.

Eton Radio



posted on Jan, 22 2009 @ 03:15 PM
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Originally posted by salchanra
reply to post by colec156
 


Colec,

About a year ago my crank radio was wiped out, I picked up a FR 500 Solarlink. No regrets at all, will always have a place in my BOB, or as NR mentioned, I should be buying another one for a Faraday cage.

Anyways, good luck in getting a radio, very much worth the cost.

Eton Radio


I have a FR 200 because the 500 was not available at the time, I like it regarding quality and refinement.



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by Northern Raider

Originally posted by salchanra
reply to post by colec156
 


Colec,

About a year ago my crank radio was wiped out, I picked up a FR 500 Solarlink. No regrets at all, will always have a place in my BOB, or as NR mentioned, I should be buying another one for a Faraday cage.

Anyways, good luck in getting a radio, very much worth the cost.

Eton Radio


I have a FR 200 because the 500 was not available at the time, I like it regarding quality and refinement.


Thats a nice radio you have there NR, I too was looking at buying one myself but then I found this one.
Click Here

Is has a mobile phone charger that maybe of some help and I'm sure that this can be adapted to charge other gadgets or batteries.
What do you think ??



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 01:41 PM
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reply to post by colec156
 


Does that get the NOAA weather channels? If so, then



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 02:46 PM
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What I like about the one I posted a link to, is that it is also a two-way radio. You can use it to send out communications instead of merely listening in. Depending on why you're bugging out, and what you're bugging out of, the ability to call for help might be infinitely more useful than the ability to listen to other people make noise.

Remember, true survival preparation doesn't just mean being ready to hightail it out of town. It means being able to survive in place and wait for help, if that's what the situation calls for. Not every disaster is bad guys coming after you. :-)



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 04:02 PM
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[

I have a FR 200 because the 500 was not available at the time, I like it regarding quality and refinement.


Thats a nice radio you have there NR, I too was looking at buying one myself but then I found this one.
Click Here

Is has a mobile phone charger that maybe of some help and I'm sure that this can be adapted to charge other gadgets or batteries.
What do you think ??



Ah Yes I read a list of reviews about this water resistant version, all were very good, It appears the basic design is loaded towards the US market and its domestic radio services, but it does adapt well enough for European use.



posted on Jan, 27 2009 @ 04:14 PM
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I have no idea what this one will be like but it's winging its way to me as I type.

The most obvious problem I foresee is it being a jack-of-all-trades and therefore a master of none.

Still, as I say, it has two chances...



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