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Farm Sharing

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posted on Jan, 12 2009 @ 12:49 PM
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A farmer near Bristol, has launched a website [villagefarm.org.uk] to allow those with no land, to raise crops and livestock on a small scale at a reasonable cost since local council allottments are so scarce now.
His plan is to adopt a bright yellow painted wheelbarrow as the 'logo' to be placed outside any farm that participates in this scheme.
Seems like a great idea, could this catch on in the States ?

Regards,

Horsegiver.




posted on Jan, 14 2009 @ 08:12 AM
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Sounds like your basic co-op, and that’s always a good idea in my mind. The co-op combines what’s best about social networking with the proper self interest that motivates us to do our best; the key ingredient missing from socialism. I think we’ll see a lot more of this kind of thing as our society returns to a more self-sustaining lifestyle.

edit for rewrite

[edit on 14-1-2009 by resistor]



posted on Jan, 14 2009 @ 02:58 PM
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I participated in one of these co-op deals many moons ago in college, and it sounded great in theory, but didn't work in practice. Some individual like myself, invested a lot of time and energy into growing their gardens, while other less industrious participants grew weed patches that were constantly on the verge of overrunning the whole lot.

Worse yet, when it came harvest time, all your produce got stolen before you ever had a chance to enjoy any of the fruits of your hard labor.. I tilled my whole plot under in frustration! Never again.
:

[edit on 14-1-2009 by LLoyd45]



posted on Jan, 14 2009 @ 03:04 PM
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Volunteering to be a share-cropper. I guess always paying property tax and wage tax is no different.

If you have to rely on other human beings to behave civilly for this to work I wouldnt do it. Especially considering this will likely attract pot-heads in their teens and twenties with more self-righteous idealism than actual work-ethic.

There are farms around here you can buy into as though buying shares of a company. What yo get in return is the harvest. You can buy in or work in to get a cut. When you go to work you work. It's supervised and you bust your ass. You also learn a lot if you've never worked a farm before.

Just letting anybody mess with your soil is a bad idea regardless of intentions.

[edit on 14-1-2009 by thisguyrighthere]



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