Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Interstate Fences?

page: 1
3
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join

posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 06:43 PM
link   
I've spent the past week traveling throughout the Southeast U.S.

In past travels I noticed a new fence erected next to the interstate in and around the greater Atlanta area. Then about six months later I noticed the fence had been extended throughout the entire 85 corridor from ATL to the Alabama border.

This week I noticed it from GA to LA and in FL as well - in other words the same fencing along the entire interstate. It's a six-foot high hog-wire fence with two rows of barbed wire on top of that. Closer to the exits it's an eight-foot high heavy gauge chain-link fence with triple rows of barbed wire.

Has anyone else noticed this? Does anyone know what company was contracted to install it? What purpose does it serve? Why are the exits reinforced?

Obviously, at first glance, one might assume that it was to keep animals off of the highway. But then why are the exits so reinforced? People concern themselves with exits, not animals.




posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:10 PM
link   
It's been several months since I've taken a trip so I haven't noticed.

I have my own pet theory about interstate highways.

Would they not be excellent runways and staging areas for the military?
They could have close access to all major cities along the entire highway system.

Several years ago a friend of mine had to make an emergency landing on the interstate highway near Saint Simon's Island, Ga.. That started me thinking how easy it would be for the government to physically take over the interstate highways.

There are many other four lane highways that could also be used for aircraft landings and takeoffs.

It's just a one of the wild theories running through my head.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by dizziedame
Would they not be excellent runways and staging areas for the military?
They could have close access to all major cities along the entire highway system.

Several years ago a friend of mine had to make an emergency landing on the interstate highway near Saint Simon's Island, Ga.. That started me thinking how easy it would be for the government to physically take over the interstate highways.

There are many other four lane highways that could also be used for aircraft landings and takeoffs.

It's just a one of the wild theories running through my head.


That's why it's called the Eisenhower Interstate System. To qualify and to get gov't funding for upkeep they have to have a certain number of miles that are straight and flat that the military can use for emergency airstrips in case of war. They got the idea for the interstate system in the US from the Autobhan.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:19 PM
link   
Well, sheep and cattle have to be herded through a fence too and sometimes they don't come back.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:24 PM
link   
We run 85 down to Montgomery, and haven't seen anything like this. The only time we've seen any kind of barriers is when we're going through all that construction, and around the new Kia plant near Westpoint. Most of the way down to Montgomery we don't see anything. We went that way towards the end of November and didn't see anything then. I'd be pretty impressed if they could have put up that much fencing in less than a month.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:26 PM
link   
In another post of mine I mentioned how Marshall Law might be implemented. I said that the Freeways would become off-limits to all except Military traffic. The state police/highway patrol etc would close all access to the freeways, restricting travel to the cities.
And all air traffic would be grounded. They already know this works. That experiment happened on 9/11/2001. Then, only Military and authorized air traffic will be allowed.
I would like to see some pics of this fence.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:27 PM
link   
Germany has autobahn air fields

they had quite a few of them in case of attack by russia.
www.lostplaces.de...


[edit on 29-12-2008 by ANNED]



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:29 PM
link   
Oh it's there. Look about fifty feet off the road. Depending on the terrain, sometimes it's more visible than others. Most of it's not more than a year or two old. The materials and construction are consistent from state to state.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:35 PM
link   
Our next trip to Montgomery should be in the next couple of weeks after we get our truck. We'll see if we see this fence and take pictures all along the way down.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by Zaphod58

That's why it's called the Eisenhower Interstate System. To qualify and to get gov't funding for upkeep they have to have a certain number of miles that are straight and flat that the military can use for emergency airstrips in case of war.


Actually that's another urban legend. Snopes.

Still, it seems like it should have been implemented. It sounds like a good idea to me.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:40 PM
link   
Somebody better tell the History Channel then, because that's where I heard about it.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:41 PM
link   
reply to post by Zaphod58
 


That would be great. Maybe someone will snap off a few before then and post. We saw it on interstates 85, 75, 65, 10 and 12.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:57 PM
link   
The Strategic Air Command used to practice refueling and reloading bombers on Interstates in places like North Dakota, back during the cold war. There were sections of straight flat highway that had all the signage low to the ground, and they would actually close the roads while they simulated bombing runs over the Soviet Union. They would land planes (B-52s I guess, don't recall) and refuel them for another run. There was a book published about it and some other interesting things, some years ago. I heard the author on NPR or somewhere. Lots of people remember having to wait, stopped on the highway, long before it became common because of congestion in most places.

There are some great stories about roads in the US in general, but you have to read through a lot of pretty dry publications to find them.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 08:06 PM
link   
Simple enough. The fence you speak of is undoubtedly situated within the Highway Right-of-Way. Meaning, the reason you see the "same fence" is because it was contracted by the government to the same contractor.

Why the fence? You already answered that question. To keep animals and PEOPLE off the interstate. Very dangerous place an interstate. Why more security around the on-ramps and off-ramps? Because that is the likely place where a person would try to gain access to the interstate.

On the remarks of interstate highways being used for military purposes. OF COURSE they are utilized by the military. Would you expect the Army to roll its vehicles down County Road 235 when Interstate I-40 runs parallel to it and all the way across the country?!!!



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 08:09 PM
link   
If you had a mass evacuation / relocation due to a disaster, especially in cases where you had to quarantine the populace, a fenced in corridor would be ideal.

The thought of that just creeps me out.

[edit on 12/29/2008 by clay2 baraka]



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 08:22 PM
link   
reply to post by Jay-in-AR
 


Yeah we get that. Google is fun right? We're just looking at the fence a bit more critically. It seems a bit costly and extreme just to protect people from getting killed by deer. I mean the road itself is the real hazard, as the interstate system is falling apart.

But there is this which talks about the standards:

roadwaystandards.dot.wi.gov...

Oh, and BTW, under normal circumstances a person - or a deer - could just walk onto the interstate at an entrance or exit ramp, so why the fence right there? Of course if it was barricaded or gaurded, nothing would get by.


[edit on 29/12/2008 by kosmicjack]



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 08:25 PM
link   
I don't understand the sarcasm here.
I glanced at your source, but I don't need to read it. By trade I am a land surveyor. I have LAYED OUT interstate highways. I understand the Right-of-Way laws and WHY they are there.
Anyhow, you were saying?

And as far as "costs" go, I don't think I need to site examples of unnecessary government spending, do I?


[edit on 29-12-2008 by Jay-in-AR]

[edit on 29-12-2008 by Jay-in-AR]



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 08:29 PM
link   
reply to post by Jay-in-AR
 

I am well aware that the military uses the interstate highway system. I've seen military convoys since the Interstate highways were opened down in my part of the woods.

I must say that before Interstate Highway 95 was built it was very difficult traveling highway 17 between Jacksonville, Fla and Charleston, S.C. as there are many military bases on that particular stretch of highway. It was bumper to bumper when the military vehicles were traveling.

I was speaking of a complete take over by the military. Normal citizens can still get from point A to point B without using the interstate system if necessary.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 08:32 PM
link   
reply to post by Jay-in-AR
 


Great. Then do you know who is responsible for constructing the fence? Is it someone like Archer Western or is it more local? I would assume each state is responsible for maintaining certain construction specifications set by law.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 08:32 PM
link   
reply to post by dizziedame
 


Interstates are built primarily for the convienience of the military. Cut and dry.
The autobahn was built as a transportation route for the German Army and our system is modelled on theirs.
It makes total sense, also.
Here in my neck of the woods, Interstate I-540 replaced Old Highway US-71, and thank goodness. 71, while a beautiful drive along the top of the Ozarks, was a pain in the ass if you were in any sort of a hurry. Now, I can zoom from NorthWest Arkansas, to CentralWestern Arkansas in about One hour, as opposed to Two.





new topics




 
3
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join