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Just Gutted and Skinned my first deer...

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posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by spinkyboo
 

I can understand your feelings but people who live off the land know all too well just how uncooperative mother nature can be she makes us work for it.

Gun in hand or not skill & work is required. To come home empty handed to a hungry family does lead to thrill and celebration when successful and rightly so imo.




posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 03:17 PM
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I got my first this year, with gun and bow. When I shot the little 4 point opening day of gun season I felt a pang of guilt. I was nervous lining up up on him but I remembered every thing my father in law taught me and got past it. The gutting was pretty straight forward because my father in law did most of it. he said the next time I would do it so watch close, So I did.

Bow season came along and from the same stand I got a beautiful 6 point. it was that, that has changed this city boys for life. I had a perfect lung shot but nobody ever told me they don't die right away on a lung shot it takes a little time. After the shot I sat there for a short time and then got down and tracked. it was very easy to find because it left a very visible blood trail. I came upon it and witnessed its last breath and watched the eyes glaze over. It set in then what I had done. it really rocked me to the core. I did not ask for help at all I drug it back to the garage myself hung it and cleaned it by myself.

Latter that evening my father in law took me aside and had a long talk with me about what I was feeling. This man is a rock but when he was talking to me about what it means to take a life he got very quite and you could hear the reverence in his voice. He knew what I was thinking and before I could even asked he said no the face will never go away. As long as you live you will see the face of that deer as it takes its last breath. What you choose to do with what you are feeling now is up to you but don't waste the deers sacrifice. I Don't know for sure if I will ever bow hunt again but I do know I will not waste this deer. every bit of it will be used.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 04:04 PM
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Originally posted by quantum wind
I got my first this year, with gun and bow. When I shot the little 4 point opening day of gun season I felt a pang of guilt. I was nervous lining up up on him but I remembered every thing my father in law taught me and got past it. The gutting was pretty straight forward because my father in law did most of it. he said the next time I would do it so watch close, So I did.

Bow season came along and from the same stand I got a beautiful 6 point. it was that, that has changed this city boys for life. I had a perfect lung shot but nobody ever told me they don't die right away on a lung shot it takes a little time. After the shot I sat there for a short time and then got down and tracked. it was very easy to find because it left a very visible blood trail. I came upon it and witnessed its last breath and watched the eyes glaze over. It set in then what I had done. it really rocked me to the core. I did not ask for help at all I drug it back to the garage myself hung it and cleaned it by myself.

Latter that evening my father in law took me aside and had a long talk with me about what I was feeling. This man is a rock but when he was talking to me about what it means to take a life he got very quite and you could hear the reverence in his voice. He knew what I was thinking and before I could even asked he said no the face will never go away. As long as you live you will see the face of that deer as it takes its last breath. What you choose to do with what you are feeling now is up to you but don't waste the deers sacrifice. I Don't know for sure if I will ever bow hunt again but I do know I will not waste this deer. every bit of it will be used.


Thank you for sharing that! I'm sure this will help some who are not into it to understand how it affects us as hunters. Thank you for your human look into hunting. Congratulations! and thanks again for sharing!



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 05:09 PM
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Congratulation there OP . In our family this happens by the time you were 10 about male or female .

My wife is always amazed at how on one hand I can kill a deer in a heart beat and 2 weeks later sit and watch the does and fawns play and still after 40yrs of hunting still have fun and joy watching and not killing .

When hunting for food the wild life becomes a collection of steaks , roasts and jerky . The rest of the time they are beautiful creatures . Yes its a oxy moron but thats how it goes .

We use as much of the kill as possible letting very little go to waste . First meal after a kill is ALWAYS liver potatoes and onions . One was cooking as the others were skinning . Heart is used and the intestines were cleaned and used for sausage . We were taught how to turn the hide to leather but gave that up years ago its a big pain . You owe it to the animal who gave its life for food to use as much of it as you can .

I totally disagree with hunting for sport and fun and not using the meat and just going for the rack size .

Respect mother nature and her wild life .



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 05:18 PM
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mmm... makin me hungry here.
for me cant beat the taste of fresh malu(kangaroo) cooked in the ground (wrapped in gum leaves is priceless). or just the malu wipu (tail) on the open fire.
Or if the men fail miserably the women always got the '
witjuti grub' as back up protein for tomorrows efforts.





posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 05:29 PM
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They only allow shotgun here for deer..


Uh Oh! Deer slugs out of a 12 gauge? I'd rather run after it with a knife, and risk impalement and lacerations than suffer the shoulder mangling from a slug. I think I would only ever consider slugs if I was Tyranosaur hunting...



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 06:06 PM
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Originally posted by Morningglory
reply to post by spinkyboo
 

I can understand your feelings but people who live off the land know all too well just how uncooperative mother nature can be she makes us work for it.

Gun in hand or not skill & work is required. To come home empty handed to a hungry family does lead to thrill and celebration when successful and rightly so imo.


I can fully appreciate what you are saying
as I, like many others, have gone hungry
and more than once.

However, this is not about feeding a desperate and starving family.
Where - yes, celebration would be appropriate.

So many hunters express this thrill of the kill.
It speaks volumes in regards to the evolution
or nonevolution of our species.

It's the joy of catching and killing.
The win.
Setting up lookouts - and flying from planes -
where animals are at a clear disadvantage -
what kind of sport is that?

I cannot imagine that they would want to be on the other end of this game.
It is not a fair one and it is in most cases unecessary.























[edit on 29-12-2008 by spinkyboo]



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by spinkyboo
 


Not one single post on here talked about flying and looking for game and setting up look outs. Do not put all hunters in that category None of us on this thread even remotely hinted to being that kind of hunter. Please do not judge us for what you yourself said you can not understand.


[edit on 29-12-2008 by angryamerican]



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 06:44 PM
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Originally posted by angryamerican
reply to post by spinkyboo
 


Not one single post on here talked about flying and looking for game and setting up look outs. Do not put all hunters in that category None of us on this thread even remotely hinted to being that kind of hunter. Please do not judge us for what you yourself admitted to not being able to understand.


Good.
Glad to hear that.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 06:50 PM
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reply to post by spinkyboo
 


You can look at people the likes of Sarah Palin for that sort of thing.
For me, I simply don't have the money to charter a helicopter to hunt WOLVES! (As if I would even hunt a dog anyhow, or hunt from the air, for that matter)

And speaking of dogs and lookouts, what about hunters that run game with trained dogs?! Dog IS man's best friend. Dog IS a hunter also.
Until a person has actually bagged an animal, they don't understand.
I'm the same way when it comes to fishing. I know a lot of folks who practice catch and release fishing. Not me. Unless it is illegal to keep what I catch, I will eat the fish. If I weren't eating the fish, I wouldn't be catching them.

All of that aside, I have given up hunting for the time being. The last time I went was two seasons ago and I had a perfect opportunity to kill a button-buck. I couldn't raise on him. I didn't need the meat.
It was actually a very cool story. For some reason, I decided to leave my blind and head off next to a game-trail. Once inside the thicket I was startled by a doe coming down the EXACT SAME TRAIL. So, I stood still and watched her come into the woods. I was amazed that she had stopped within 15 feet of where I was to graze, so I just watched her for a good minute before I heard some more noise... This time it was the button-buck running down the exact path she had taken with his nose to the ground.
I stood still and watched him join her to graze. I watched them both from a distance of less than 8 feet (I'd say) at times for more than 3 full minutes. Then I realized that once this buck realized I was so close to his lady friend he may not be too happy about it, I half-readied my weapon and said "HEY"...
He looks up and goes "wwhhhssst wwhhssst" and took off.
Then for some reason, I thought, hey I'm going to follow them... I walked up the trail about another 200 feet, being stealthy, and this time I encountered them about 80 feet out and watched them for another 2 minutes or so until I got tired of it and left.

I could have killed that dude five times over, I just decided not to. I have killed four deer in my life and I have never done so without at least coming close to crying.

PS: Actually, I am considering taking up hunting full-time again. But with a good camera. I have tried using the camera I have now, but the camera doesn't do justice to my ability to get close to these animals. In the last year alone I've stalked Eight bear and more deer than I can number off the top of my head.
With a good camera I would be good enough to do some very nice photography work.

[edit on 29-12-2008 by Jay-in-AR]



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:05 PM
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Jay,
I can't explain it - wasn't sure I'd like bowhunting and killing a deer. A few times I have passed on deer for a variety of reasons. One was an enormous spike.. I figured that deer would be huge one day. Another was this smaller 6 pt that had extra large rack.. Some of best experiences I didn't get a deer.. Watching them in the wild..There is a certain beauty. Here is an animal that can survive almost anywhere. In fact, it is almost a spiritual experience...don't laugh till you tried it. To begin with you prepare by mastering your equipment. Even a good shot doesn't mean much- I was that but didn't get a deer my first year. There is a lot of technique to learn the basics of hunting as well as the behavoir of deer in different conditions..weather/rut/amt of hunting in the area. In the woods you see many things that is a big part of the experience. Shoot maybe a whole thread could be devoted to adventures in the woods..

BP



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:14 PM
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Originally posted by Jay-in-AR
reply to post by spinkyboo
 


All of that aside, I have given up hunting for the time being. The last time I went was two seasons ago and I had a perfect opportunity to kill a button-buck. I couldn't raise on him. I didn't need the meat.
It was actually a very cool story. For some reason, I decided to leave my blind and head off next to a game-trail. Once inside the thicket I was startled by a doe coming down the EXACT SAME TRAIL. So, I stood still and watched her come into the woods. I was amazed that she had stopped within 15 feet of where I was to graze, so I just watched her for a good minute before I heard some more noise... This time it was the button-buck running down the exact path she had taken with his nose to the ground.
I stood still and watched him join her to graze. I watched them both from a distance of less than 8 feet (I'd say) at times for more than 3 full minutes. Then I realized that once this buck realized I was so close to his lady friend he may not be too happy about it, I half-readied my weapon and said "HEY"...
He looks up and goes "wwhhhssst wwhhssst" and took off.
Then for some reason, I thought, hey I'm going to follow them... I walked up the trail about another 200 feet, being stealthy, and this time I encountered them about 80 feet out and watched them for another 2 minutes or so until I got tired of it and left.

I could have killed that dude five times over, I just decided not to. I have killed four deer in my life and I have never done so without at least coming close to crying.

PS: Actually, I am considering taking up hunting full-time again. But with a good camera. I have tried using the camera I have now, but the camera doesn't do justice to my ability to get close to these animals. In the last year alone I've stalked Eight bear and more deer than I can number off the top of my head.
With a good camera I would be good enough to do some very nice photography work.

[edit on 29-12-2008 by Jay-in-AR]


This is a great story. "Almost crying" - a very good sign. Can you imagine if everyone who was about to end a living beings life came close to crying...
We wouldn't be killing each other.
Probably not going to happen anytime soon -
but I think this story is a good start.

YES! A camera. Good shooting! Such beautiful creatures out there in the world.

They will appreciate you letting them live.




posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:15 PM
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reply to post by BlackProjects
 


Oh sure, there is much more to killing a deer than just being a good shot (unless you are on a guided hunt, that is). For me, I'm an expert marksman in the eyes of the US Army. I could have gone to sniper school, if I had the desire, but I didn't.
My hunting experience previous to joining the military came in handy for Himalayan Tracking Training...
But yes, there are a lot of other factors. A good hunter will have no less than three spots to hunt from in any one location, depending on wind and other weather-related factors. And observing the game to understand their behavior is the most fun to me. The story I relayed above was one of the best experiences I have ever had in the woods and I didn't even try to shoot anything.
Another neat one behavior related was from the same location, but this time in my primary blind. I observed a doe and two twin fawns come over a fence to feed in an alf-alfa patch for a bit. When they left, the male twin was bringing up the rear and before he and the female fawn jumped over the fence (the mother had already crossed over to lead the way) the female fawn stopped to look over behind them (I knew but they probably didn't know that another hunter was located in a fence-line in the direct area she looked back to. Anyhow, the male fawn got impatient with her, but instead of moving ahead of her, he literally kicked her in the ass to get her over the fence so he could continue to play rear security.
It was an awesome thing to watch. The brother was looking out for mom and sis.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:18 PM
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Jay,
I certainly am not an expert or anything.
Yeah I have only bow hunted but know how they sort of work in tandem. Especially, I have seen older does that will stop and scan an area for minutes - looking up and down. Any movement its game over. As you mention the wind/scent thing..

BP



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by spinkyboo
 


I appreciate your appreciation, but seriously, I am no saint.
I appreciate what I kill for my nourishment, but aside from that... Well, lets just say that my wife has, a couple of times when she was really displeased with my behavior, said that I treat animals better than I do humans.

This is true. For the most part, animals are innocent (although my pitbull would often times do things that he knew was wrong out of spite).

Eh, long story short, the morality stops at the point when a person behaves like an animal himself. Because lets face it folks, the kind of change we all seek in mankind is not going to come over night. It will not come without interference. Mankind is f-ed up.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:45 PM
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Mankind is f-ed up.


I will agree and disagree on this. We are not so much messed up as we have not grown as far from our animal selfs as most of us think we should have by now.

We have all this energy stored inside that was used threw out history to survive with. now things are so easy we don't use that energy for survival. Think about what happens to a child when they have a over abundance of energy. They act pretty dum and usually cause trouble. does that mean they are messed up?

Not in my opinion it doesn't. Ive mentioned this theory of mine before and gotten flamed. If you feel the need to flame please do it to the theory not me.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:47 PM
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reply to post by angryamerican
 


I actually agree with you.
Second line.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 07:52 PM
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However, to elaborate the point (I probably should have editted this to my previous post, haha mods) the point still stands, I believe.
The point being that we, at this point, NEED some sort of interference (and let me just say, for the record, that we had better hope that a conscious god and/or higher-order aliens actually do exist) to stop ourselves and this animalistic behavior lest it destroy us. Because if one of those things actually do NOT exist, we are doomed just like every other eradicated species before us.
On the other hand...
Eh, nevermind. Completely off-topic.



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 08:38 PM
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Well, I do not go out specifically hunting as any tradition. But, it does good for every person that eats meat to have to kill at least one time themselves and do the whole job. So yeah, one time I shot a rabbit. I leaned over and thanked it for providing food, took it home, prepared it and ate it.

It is respectful to realize that meat just doesn't start out in sterilized plastic and styrofoam containers but, comes from animals. It gives much more respect for the animals that provide nourishment. It also instills the ability to realize that yeah I could do this if I had to.

With all of that being said. I am glad you used the whole animal. It bothers me when every so often I see a head removed from a carcass rotting beside the roadway.





[edit on 29/12/2008 by toochaos4u]



posted on Dec, 29 2008 @ 08:50 PM
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reply to post by toochaos4u
 


I don't like prepping small game. It is much easier to have two people on things like rabbit or squirrel, to tear the hide off...

Tip for people who actively hunt deer and may not realize you can do this: Cut a slit in the back of a deer's neck hide, poke a rope through it, puncture two holes in a tennis ball opposite one another, thread the rope through, tie a knot on the back end, tie the rope to the bumper of a car and put the car in reverse. It sounds horrible, but you can tear the hide away from the body without leaving anything behind that way.
I haven't done it myself, so I don't know what other cuts you would need to make to maximize efficiency, but this can make things a little easier.





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