A Priceless Lesson In Humility

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posted on Dec, 15 2008 @ 08:38 PM
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As I was driving home tonight I was listening to NPR as this short story was being discussed. I found it very moving and thought provoking so I thought I would share it with you.


A few years ago, I took a sightseeing trip to Washington, D.C. I saw many of our nation's treasures, and I also saw a lot of our fellow citizens on the street — unfortunate ones, like panhandlers and homeless folks.

Standing outside the Ronald Reagan Center, I heard a voice say, "Can you help me?" When I turned around, I saw an elderly blind woman with her hand extended. In a natural reflex, I reached in to my pocket, pulled out all of my loose change and placed it on her hand without even looking at her. I was annoyed at being bothered by a beggar.

But the blind woman smiled and said, "I don't want your money. I just need help finding the post office."

In an instant, I realized what I had done. I acted with prejudice — I judged another person simply for what I assumed she had to be.

I hated what I saw in myself. This incident re-awakened my core belief. It reaffirmed that I believe in humility, even though I'd lost it for a moment.

The thing I had forgotten about myself is that I am an immigrant. I left Honduras and arrived in the U.S. at the age of 15. I started my new life with two suitcases, my brother and sister, and a strong, no-nonsense mother. Through the years, I have been a dishwasher, roofer, cashier, mechanic and pizza delivery driver among many other humble jobs, and eventually I became a network engineer.

In my own life, I have experienced many open acts of prejudice. I remember a time, at age 17 — I was a busboy, and I heard a father tell his little boy that if he did not do well in school, he would end up like me. I have also witnessed the same treatment of family and friends, so I know what it's like, and I should have known better.

But now, living in my American middle-class lifestyle, it is too easy to forget my past, to forget who I am and where I have been, and to lose sight of where I want to be going. That blind woman on the streets of Washington, D.C., cured me of my self-induced blindness. She reminded me of my belief in humility and to always keep my eyes and heart open.

By the way, I helped that lady to the post office. And in writing this essay, I hope to thank her for the priceless lesson.

by Felipe Morales
NPR




posted on Dec, 15 2008 @ 08:54 PM
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It is sad that there are many that assume everyone on the street asking for help is probably a hustler. I was homeless by choice for awhile and wasn't very good at it. At least this guy was willing to give her some money rather than ignore her and walk away. Some remember where they came from, while others don't want to be reminded.

In some way, everyone is tested at some point. The ability to remember it and have remorse is still another. Sharing this story was just one more way.



posted on Dec, 15 2008 @ 08:58 PM
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Thank you,

A priceless tale of how we all label and assume.

We must never forget the second golden rule as such.

To treat Fame and Fortune, and Riches and wealth

Culture and Race

Against

Blame and Poverty,

Lonlines and Isolation

The same as they arrive in our own lives.

To see them as the imposters they are, and remain the same no whatever our or others circumstances are.

Only then can be be genuine, from our core, real and real Human beings.

Brothers and Sisters alike.

The story touched me very deeply thank you.

Elf.



posted on Dec, 15 2008 @ 09:01 PM
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Originally posted by aleon1018
I was homeless by choice for awhile and wasn't very good at it.


Aleon I am intrigued.

How Long For.

Did you have access to any money if you wanted, or the choice to go to friend or family members with a call if you wanted.

Oh and most importantly,

By Choice Why?

Kind Regards,

Elf



posted on Dec, 15 2008 @ 09:24 PM
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reply to post by MischeviousElf
 


Many things pushed me beyond the edge. At the time, walking away from work, home, car and my identity was as if some search for myself. Besides the fact that my ex-wife was getting married again and expected me to be with the kids while she went on her honeymoon. Her former boyfriend was a drunk and wouldn't allow me to see them either.(more drama)


It was only for 7 weeks in the summer. Paranoia with 9/11 was as if some catalyst from the year before. And I desperately wanted something to change in my life.

I survived gangs and shootings. But the one thing that really made it worth while, if only for a few hours, was sitting at the train station outside watching the cattle come and go in the morning and evening. At that point, I was free.....in a deluded sort of way. Even the homeless have to work in some way to survive. Now banks throw families out on the streets like Scrooge.

When I hear talk about 2012, I think that's still a few years away


I've been on disability for 5 years and couldn't have received it so easily without the help from people who knew me...even if they were US Marshalls....or whomever. Sad part is, many knew who I was and called me by name. It was as if some crazy game and I was part of some pool like some football game. I wonder who won


[edit on 15-12-2008 by aleon1018]



posted on Dec, 15 2008 @ 09:30 PM
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Assuming is not sign of intelligence.

I once assumed I was intelligent...



posted on Dec, 15 2008 @ 10:17 PM
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reply to post by MischeviousElf
 


Thank you for sharing those sentiments.
I couldn't have said it better.



posted on Dec, 15 2008 @ 11:38 PM
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Another great example as to why we should always question our convictions.

Thanks for the Thread!



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 12:03 AM
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reply to post by HunkaHunka
 


Thanks HH, parables seem to be a lost means of expression, this little story being the exception. It is extraordinary that sometimes such small events can trigger such great awareness.



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 12:26 AM
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I would like to share with my friends a poem I've written.

and all the mistral tulips were fools lips mimicking symmetry
my saviour laid in a silver chrysalis chamber, commonly referred to as manger
no stranger to danger this odd man with sandals
this man who spoke peace as his thesis
of mice and men, of meek and mild
after which a religion of our world has clearly been styled
but never perfected before infection
a superstitious inquisition, a heretic trial
an old-fashioned witch hunt pent up in denial
turn the other cheek and reap up the benefits
far stronger than steel, my sword is called penmanship
defeated by man, resurrected again
portent of lazarus lost in the sand
a self-imposed crucifixion as the theory of man
but i'll be damned if i understand it, or even a smidgen
saline tears from a statue bright as blood in the glisten
i want to be saved, but i don't need a saviour
i stand on my own, and thats why i fail here
sailed years without end, never spotted land
but then a man walked up, and offered his hand
a boy from galilee, a man from the stars
an unorthodox teacher, a prophet at large

I would ask in this moment that all truth be revealed. Please help me to follow your most exquisite example, light up my heart as an artist. Immolate my iniquity in the most holy conflagration of white light. Walk with me and hold my hand. Send me a woman to teach and complete me. I pray these things in Christ's name. Amen.



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 12:50 AM
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I heard this as well. I was only home for a moment this afternoon, and I heard it on the radio before heading back out the door. I'm glad to hear it affected others the same way it affected me.



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 02:46 AM
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I'll prefer to be cynical, although there are many people out there who want a chance and are willing to make a going of their circumstances there are many more who are ready to take what they want and don't give a damn about the consequences.



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 03:10 AM
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Originally posted by DangerDeath
Assuming is not sign of intelligence.

I once assumed I was intelligent...


Assume...

AssUMeing makes an "Ass" out of "U" and "Me"



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 03:33 AM
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In pop culture, the word cynicism generally describes the opinions of those who see self-interest as the primary motive of human behaviour, and who disincline to rely upon sincerity, human virtue, or altruism as motivations.

Oscar Wilde described a cynic as 'A man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing'. Others define cynicism as the direct opposite of fanaticism, thus also implying agnosticism as its integral part.

On the other hand, the Oxford English Dictionary suggests as the usual modern definition (per cynic): showing "a disposition to disbelieve in the sincerity or goodness of human motives and actions" and a tendency "to express this by sneers and sarcasms".

Why would one wish to fashion themselves in such a manner? I like sarcasm as much as the next guy, but I do have an innate belief in the goodness of humanity. I'm sorry you've lost yours, or thrown it aside. I have prayed for you. My will is destiny manifested.



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 03:57 AM
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Awesome story
Thank you for sharing it. So many problems in our society would be solved if we all had a little humility

God bless you



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 04:13 AM
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Originally posted by ExquisitExamplE
In pop culture, the word cynicism generally describes the opinions of those who see self-interest as the primary motive of human behaviour, and who disincline to rely upon sincerity, human virtue, or altruism as motivations.

Oscar Wilde described a cynic as 'A man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing'. Others define cynicism as the direct opposite of fanaticism, thus also implying agnosticism as its integral part.

On the other hand, the Oxford English Dictionary suggests as the usual modern definition (per cynic): showing "a disposition to disbelieve in the sincerity or goodness of human motives and actions" and a tendency "to express this by sneers and sarcasms".

Why would one wish to fashion themselves in such a manner? I like sarcasm as much as the next guy, but I do have an innate belief in the goodness of humanity. I'm sorry you've lost yours, or thrown it aside. I have prayed for you. My will is destiny manifested.


Because who wants to be a gullible victim to crime?


But he said he would carry my handbag for me officer


You know yourself as you live in this world what a complete bunch of Bastards the modern lifestyle has created, the word cynic should mean someone who has experienced what it's like to live in a modern large town or city.

I'll tell you the type of people who aren't cynical... politicians, you know the people who have lost touch with reality... yeah sure let's all go hug a hoody.

I would love nothing better than to be able to put my faith in humanity and the humility of others... is it plausable in today's world... maybe.. is it wise? No

[edit on 16/12/2008 by spitefulgod]



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 06:41 AM
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Thanks for that Dog.





Peace



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 07:58 AM
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Good thread and great story.

I'm sure most of us have been on the giving and the receiving end of prejudice at some time. We have certainly all been 'influenced' by mainstream culture, it is very difficult not to be....... unfortunately.

"I used to wonder why people don't believe in themselves
But then I saw the way they portrayed us to everyone else
They cursed us, to only see the worst in ourselves
blind to the fact the whole time we were hurting ourselves"

Caught in a Hustle by Immortal Technique.

Peace



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 11:21 AM
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While quite a moving tale, and one which is worthy of note... How long til he resumes the same actions of before and forgets this simple circumstance.

We are taught to believe that beggers, homeless and etc are beneath us... They do not pay taxes... These poor, worthless (They have nor give any worth to the banks, therefore are classed as beneath the average human) people do not ask for much, yet enough so they can sustain themselves or their family yet already even before meeting them have a stigma attached.

What im trying to say is that despite what the original poster of the story said, (not the poster who made it available) the fact remains he/she will forget about it in a few days, or so.. And thats how it should be. We have been taught from an early age that random people who we do not know, should only be given the once off treatment, and we will feel good for a while, yet they will still be homeless or not fit enough to help themselves still.



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 12:01 PM
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Odd tale. Most blind people know exactly how many steps it is to get to their destination.

There was a blind fellow near us who used to hitchike to where he had to go. He was uncanny at internal timing, and being able to tell you "There's a right-hand turn coming up.." etc.





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