Teacher tells 7 year-olds Santa's Fake.

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posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:19 PM
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Originally posted by saint4God

I'm sorry to hear that and that your world is more comfortable being shielded from truth.


The operant word there should be "was". I feel sorry for any child being raised by people who think they're ready for any truth. Let's slap 'em with the cold hand of reality. Wake 'em up to just how dark and vicious the world is. You know, for preparation. There's no room for fun or fantasy or pretend or magic.

They'll thank you later. Good luck with that.

I'm sorry to hear you felt the Santa myth was a betrayal by your parents. I can tell you that your experience is not typical among the folks I know.




posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:21 PM
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Wow, I just read all of these responces, and it makes me wonder about some people. I`m 53 years old, and I can remember being in the 2nd and 3rd grades. When Christmas rolled around in those years, I remember it as not only being a magical time of year, but one full of love and giving. Yes, even my parents told me there was a Santa Claus all those years ago and I believed them. But as with time, many grow up and stop believeing in him. But, that does not mean we can`t keep the love and giving part of it in our hearts does it? Did I get upset over the fact that my parents lied to me about it? Why would I? If anyone does, we better check to see if they have a heart or not. I understand the reasoning behind the story of Santa Claus, do you?



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:22 PM
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As I said before my kids still believe and Santa and I personally love that they do. They keep a little naivety and stay my babies a little longer. I personally don't believe in God but I would never tell my son or daughter that. I'll let them believe in God if having faith makes them feel joy.

As for the presents, in my house Santa always brings one gift only and all the rest comes from Mum and dad and grandparents etc. Then we all get the appreciation we deserve.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by yeahright
 


Nor is it typical of anyone I know.

I think most children have good fun with Santa, and even when they learn the truth, the magic is still there.

I think those who take offense to their parents "lying" to them are definitely the exception, not the rule.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:24 PM
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I have noticed that apparently some of you who are adamantly against the idea of telling children about Santa Clause believe that there is a right and a wrong way to raise children. I may be reading into it too much, but each parent must make their own decisions regarding their own children, with their children's best interests at heart, no? I just don't see where some people get authority to demand all others to raise their kids in a specific way..

Edit to add: My older sister of five years told me when I was 4 years old that Santa wasn't real. Yes, I cried. But what happened the next day? I still got presents, and special treatment because my parents felt sorry for me! I was certainly not devastated by any means, and I actually had one of my most memorable Christmases that year!!

[edit on 11-12-2008 by Alexander_Supertramp]



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:24 PM
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There's a misconception here that lying is fun...and apparently to some the only form of fun. There seems to be a misunderstanding that adhering to the truth makes you old/boring. Where this comes from I know not, but I've seen the effects from both truth and lies. This should be an easy pick for ATS'er who "Deny Ignorance". Denying Ignorance means sharing the truth, not perpetuating lies. You can both tell the truth AND have fun. You can lying/deceive and still be boring (I've got 10 years of banking experience to cite examples). Bury Saint Nicholas, but share his spirit of giving and joy. Why is this difficult?



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:25 PM
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reply to post by saint4God
 


Why is it difficult to accept that we can raise our children the way we see fit, even if that includes sharing the story of Santa? Regardless of whether or not you think it's the right thing to do.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:28 PM
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Originally posted by nyk537
Why is it difficult to accept that we can raise our children the way we see fit, even if that includes sharing the story of Santa? Regardless of whether or not you think it's the right thing to do.


Where did I give the impression that you could not raise your children the way you see fit?



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:29 PM
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reply to post by saint4God
 


I understand that you are entitled to your own views, but you really believe everyone should tell the truth 100% of the time? That is a dramatically black-and-white way to look at things, and that's a dangerous way to live, in my opinion.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:29 PM
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Originally posted by saint4God

Originally posted by secretstash
Children play pretend all the time. I don't see how this is any different.


They're children, you're the adult. Children are the students, parents are the teachers. Although many adults seem to behave like children, this is a maturity issue more than a reasonable excuse.


Yes, I am the adult, the parent and I see no cause for denying my kids a little fun at Christmas by pretending that there is a Santa.

When my daughter was three or four she asked if Santa was real. I said no and in exactly five minutes she back to telling me what she wanted Santa to bring her for Christmas.

Like I said my youngest is now 10 and he is not emotionally devastated to find out that Santa is not real. My kids are very mature for their age sometimes. But most times they are still just kids. If you felt so betrayed by your parents over Santa Clause then there are deeper issues.

I have brought my kids up to understand that not everything you see on TV is real and that movies are just movies to be watched for entertainment only. They make their own interpretations and then we discuss why something is or is not right.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:30 PM
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Every where we turn it's the same dilemma.

Better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all, or shall we raise cold-hearted realists who know perfectly well that magic fairy dust is just fake glitter and calculate the value of Christmas on their calculator?

I vote let 'em have a little magic while they can. They'll be forced to trade it in for cold hard reality soon enough.


[edit on 11-12-2008 by Heike]

[edit on 11-12-2008 by Heike]



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by saint4God
 


I suppose it was somewhere in your many posts suggesting that those who let their kids believe in Santa are lying to them, and that one day they will grow to resent us and lose trust in us.

Could have been in there somewhere.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:30 PM
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Originally posted by Alexander_Supertramp
I understand that you are entitled to your own views, but you really believe everyone should tell the truth 100% of the time? That is a dramatically black-and-white way to look at things, and that's a dangerous way to live, in my opinion.


Why fear the truth? Don't you want to know the truth? Don't you feel you have the right to know the truth? Why do children not have this right?



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by saint4God
Why is this difficult?


Why is it necessary? Is all fiction a "lie" that should be foresworn? All pretend? All fantasy? Not that you have to answer, but I have to wonder if you have children. It changes things. Tremendously.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by nyk537
one day they will grow to resent us and lose trust in us.


They justifiably could, I did not say absolutely they would.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:33 PM
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Originally posted by yeahright
Why is it necessary? Is all fiction a "lie" that should be foresworn? All pretend? All fantasy? Not that you have to answer, but I have to wonder if you have children. It changes things. Tremendously.


I have, yes. We have a lot of fun, none of it involves lies. When we pretend, that precedent is set. I don't want children to lie to me, so I will not to them.

[edit on 11-12-2008 by saint4God]



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by saint4God
 


Chidlren do have a right to the truth, but that isn't the point.

Children want to believe in something magical, they want something like that. Those who never get the experience the joy of believing in Santa are missing out in my opinion.

How you think they feel when they see all the other kids talking about Santa, and they see the sparkle in their eyes? Do you think they feel happy or somehow superior because they know the "truth"? Or do you think they feel sad that they can't feel that way?



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by saint4God
Why fear the truth? Don't you want to know the truth? Don't you feel you have the right to know the truth? Why do children not have this right?


As rational beings, we should relish the truth, absolutely! But, children are not rational, they are pure and innocent. I, personally, seek for as much truth as can be found every day...why should children, who cannot even begin to fathom the harshness of the world, be forced into it before they are mentally capable of handling it?



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:34 PM
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i told my early that there was no santa. that is something that should be left to the parents to decide when to tell...the teacher shold have known that.
parents have a right to be upset.
gonna read the other 3 pages now



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 03:38 PM
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Originally posted by nyk537
Chidlren do have a right to the truth, but that isn't the point.


It totally and absolutely is the point.


Originally posted by nyk537
How you think they feel when they see all the other kids talking about Santa, and they see the sparkle in their eyes? Do you think they feel happy or somehow superior because they know the "truth"? Or do you think they feel sad that they can't feel that way?


Sounds like you're assuming that a child has no imagination or joy without being fed a lie about Santa. This simply isn't the case. Sadness isn't there, they're thinking about gifts, snow, gingerbread cookies, etc. All these things are wonderfully real. Regarding superiority, not the case as well, in teaching to respect the beliefs of others and not cause conflicts there is no issue with getting along with other children be it Santa, politics or religion.

[edit on 11-12-2008 by saint4God]





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