Teacher tells 7 year-olds Santa's Fake.

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posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:19 PM
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Is "pretending" a lie? Sure it is. Everything isn't always so black and white, though, is it? Do you have kids? Do you tell them the unvarnished truth about everything? Or do you occasionally do a little "pretending" because it's fun for them and you as well?

You know, millions and millions of kids grew up through puberty believe in Santa, and I'm hard pressed to come up with a single example of it doing any harm. Of course, I guess we could eliminate all the magic and pretend fantasy from their lives. Start turning them into miniature adults as soon as they're old enough to talk. They sure have enough venues for a solid dose of reality that I didn't have. Just casual conversation on the street is significantly rougher than it was back in the 60's.

"Real" can suck. I'm not sure you do a child any great favors by exposing them to nothing but "real".




posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:23 PM
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Originally posted by yeahright
You call it a "lie", I call it a little harmless pretend magic and part of the innocence of youth. There are any number of things we as parents do to add some enjoyment and harmless fantasy to our kids' lives. They grow up soon enough, and personally I'd have been pretty upset had one of my children's teachers done that. There's plenty of time for reality. Let's let them get through the 3rd grade.


This is where I wonder...allowing for belief in things that aren't true sets up the potential for that inclination to spill over into future concerns. Such as 'believing' that the economy will get better without any proactive and rational interaction or 'believing' that a salesman really cares about anything more than the commission.

Cynical, for sure, and I am positive that there are people out there who deserve the benefit of the doubt but 'irrational' belief (what has been referred to here as believing in magic) isn't a good foundation for future decision making skills.

While I don't think that belief in an of itself can is a negative, perhaps it is a valid point to make it clear that "Santa" is an archetype that embodies the spirit of the holiday season, rather than a guy who actually exists. It is a seemingly simple distinction but important in the molding of an impressionable mind. Working with our myths/legends/traditions to instill a more realisitc worldview in preperation for the adventures and tribulations of maturity is a much more valid parental endeavour than allowing a childhood illusion for the sake of the illusion...in my opinion.

And this is coming from a guy who learned that Santa wasn't real when the 'bully twins' on my playground made fun of me for believing in Santa...pretty sad day and one that earned me a 'talking to' with my parents to not spoil it for my siblings...



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:24 PM
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I'd rather have my kids grow up believing the make-believe of Santa Claus then have them all gather 'round the flag and grow up believing the make-believe of politicians to be honest.

Kids will be kids.. but only if we allow them to be.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:25 PM
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If they didn't find out that day, they would another day. Look, the game is fun for a while but at least now these kids will appreciate where these presents are really coming from.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:28 PM
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reply to post by Jkd Up
 


That's fantastic. Good work, Mr. Teacher!

This ridiculous double-standard of lying to kids and expecting them not to lie is straight-up dangerous. Yes, it's all fun and cutesy and a laugh, but if you need to lie to your kids to make Christmas fun you're doing it wrong. Treat kids with the respect they deserve.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:29 PM
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XMas can be joyous and magical while still adhering to values like truth and honesty.

I don't know if I think the teacher was wrong to do what they did though.

[edit on 11/12/08 by Fuggle]



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:30 PM
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reply to post by MemoryShock
 


And my point is, there's plenty of time for that. I'm not going to sit pre schooler, or 8 year old down and say, "Santa is an archetype that embodies the spirit of the holiday season, rather than a guy who actually exists". Or even attempt to realy a message like that.

If I see a big flaw today (In my opinion) it's that kids grow up way too fast. A little more Santa and a little less booty shakin' big pimpin' Paris/Britney etc wouldn't hurt my feelings. They're sure exposed to enough of that crap, and there's as much "unreal" about that as there is Santa.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:31 PM
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Now that teacher knows how I used to feel in Sunday school, before I was asked not to come back.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:31 PM
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Originally posted by HunkaHunka
It's still something that should be left to parents.


Of that, I agree with one hundred percent...




What if the teacher said there was no God? There is such thing as cultural sensibilities regardless of what one might see as truth.


I would have the same opinion if it were about God (the invisible man)...in fact, I intentionally left that out to not spur a religious debate...


Though I, again, agree that cultural sensibilities should be attended to regarding truth...though as the human race gets more and more in tune to each other, there won't be such huge differences in our belief system. But that is my opinion/projection...



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:36 PM
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You think the kids be more appreciative that it was their parents that put the presents under the tree instead of Santa. My mom and dad put the presents under the tree? (drops on my knee and screams) NOOOOOOOOO!!!!



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:37 PM
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Left to parents? Like sex education?

I reckon the problem is many parents aren't doing their jobs AS parents.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:40 PM
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I'll probably get flamed for this, but if children were taught at a VERY young age that there is NO SANTA then maybe Xmas wouldn't be such a consumer driven holiday. Maybe some "old-fashioned" values, like helping those in need and being kind to one another would get taught instead of encouraging the "what's in it for me" mentality



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:41 PM
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reply to post by deltaboy
 


Maybe. If there's no disillusionment involved, sure, why not?

This reminds me of people who sit down at a dinner table, bow their heads and thank a creator for the food on the table...rather than thanking the chef and the money earners. The grand creator didn't put the food there.

And Santa didn't put those presents there. People worked hard to earn money to buy that stuff.

There's nothing wrong with being on the level from the get-go.

There's magic in anything. In a leaf. Or a seed sprouting. There's magic and mystery right there. It won't stunt a child's imagination if they don't buy into Santa Claus.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:42 PM
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I used to be a sub myself before getting a teaching position and this is not the way to go to calm a rowdy class. Seriously.
Just makes things worse.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:42 PM
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Originally posted by yeahright
If I see a big flaw today (In my opinion) it's that kids grow up way too fast.


I think it is necessary. In a world where every commercial product is vying for the attention and wallet of the consumer by using fanciful imageries and illusory promise, it certainly isn't a bad idea to start early with the education of these tactics so as to better prepare an individual for the future...which will include a much more complex integration of sociological knowledge and technology.

But again, I state that this is my opinion...



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:43 PM
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Originally posted by yeahright
A little more Santa and a little less booty shakin' big pimpin' Paris/Britney etc wouldn't hurt my feelings. They're sure exposed to enough of that crap, and there's as much "unreal" about that as there is Santa.




You're reading my mind man!

That's the problem though isn't it? Parents today want their kids to grow up so fast. They want them to come out acting like mature adults and not like the kids they are. I could go into many more issues that stem from this sentiment, but that's for a different thread.

I feel sorry for the kids that never get a chance to believe in something as magical as Santa.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:45 PM
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I dont see a problem telling kids about santa until they are 7 or 8...after that and its just sad and weird that parents need to lie about something as ridiculous as a flying fat man that gives children presents..anyway im pretty sure life is alot harsher than a teacher telling you something like this,those parents outraged need to have a reality check,especially in this day and age.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by MemoryShock
 


You're certainly entitled to your opinion. And I understand your logic. But just speaking for myself and not attempting to project onto anyone else, I'll just say I knew everything there was to know about raising kids.

Until I had a couple.



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by Solomons
 


Well imagine if a teacher doesn't have high expectations for the students and tells them that as well as if it was a fact. Think that be similar? Pretty much putting down their hopes or dreams?



posted on Dec, 11 2008 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by yeahright
 


Agreed.

That's why I'll say again, you have to have kids to understand this fully.

Once you've seen that sparkle in your child's eye talking about Santa and reindeer and everything else, you don't want to lose that. In reality you know it will end one day, but you want it to end on your terms, not a substitute teachers.

They grow up too fast.





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