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Can NASA Really Send A Radio Or TV Signal From The Moon ?

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posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 01:19 AM
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I have often wondered if it is really possible to send a radio or video signal from the moon. I don't think so and here is why. Firstly, to my understanding the most advanced technology currently being used to send radio and video signals is satellite technology. According to what they tell us most satelites sit in the clark arc which is said to be 23,000 miles above the earth, I am more inclined to beleive that their actually orbit is closer to 300 miles above the earth. It is said that their is a radiation belt that exsist at about 300 miles above the earth and that no aircraft has exceeded that height. For the sake of arguement I will use the 23,000 mile figure and I think even at that I can still prove my point. These are facts, in order to send a radio or tv signal from the Soviet Union to the United States you need a 50 foot satellite dish to uplink the signal from the Soviet Union to the satellite located at 23,000 miles up and you would need a satellite dish 50 foot in the USA to recieve it down from the satellite. The Moon is approx. 250,000 miles from the earth, which means that you would need a satellite dish at least 500 ft. in diameter on the moon and one 500 ft. in diameter on the earth. I have not read, seen or heard of any such satellite dishs, because they don't exsist. So how then do they send a signal ? they don't. Someone said that they link satellites together in a row, the only problem with this theory is that if just one of the satellites linked together malfunctioned the whole link would go down with no way of recovery. Radio and Television signals do not go on endlessly, as we have been brainwashed to think, they have limited range. So tell me, how is it done ?




posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 01:34 AM
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So how do you explain the images sent back from the Pioneer and Voyager space probes? Or was that just another exercise in brainwashing?
Does that also mean that the Mars rovers must be trundling around the desert in Nevada somewhere?
It sounds like you have a case of 'bad science'


[Edited on 2-4-2004 by Zero Point]



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 02:04 AM
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Sure it can. All you're really talking about is sending a 'Signal' that has enough 'Energy Potential' to cover that distance (Earth to Moon) which isn't even that far. Then as far as other 'Radiation' or whatever that would damage the signal, most problems can be avoided by using a Frequency of a different range.

In basic terms you would really have two areas that you're dealing with. One would be the 'Energy Output' being sent. The other would be the 'Frequency' at which it the 'ElectroMagnetic' Energy is traveling. Depending on the conditions required, it comes down to choosing a mixture of "WaveLength and Frequency" of Electromagnetic Energy which results in a signal from Radio Waves to Gamma Rays. When you consider that these Waves of Energy have a Max. Speed of 186,000 miles per second (Speed of Light within a Vacume), the distance from us to the moon isn't all that far to travel.



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 02:39 AM
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oops


[Edited on 2-4-2004 by outsider]



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 02:40 AM
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Well if you remember a few years back if you wanted satellite TV you had to have an ugly 12 foot dish in your back yard. Now you can do the same with an 18" dish.

The guy with the 56k modem connection gets the same information here as the guy with the 3mbps connection, it just take longer. Just like when you click on streaming video, you'll notice the video doesn't usually begin until the buffer is filled enough to keep up with the video playback.



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 10:42 AM
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sure they can HuH ? what technology do they use ? speed does not equal distance, so a signal traveling 186,000 miles per second has nothing to do with how far the signal can travel, although that was a good attemp of misinformation. Even the signal you recieve on a 18 inch satellite dish is uplinked by a 50 ft. dish. Further, the rover or any other machine that they have alledgedly sent to moon, mars or any other planet doesn't have any kind of dish of any size that could be used to send a signal. Take a look at the rover and tell me what component is used to send radio signals ? If there is something beyond satellite technology that they are using, what is it and how come no one has ever heard of it. The fact is that satellites are used around the world to send most signals are themselves proof of the limitations of radio and television transmissions.



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 10:48 AM
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Look up LOS (Line of Sight) and that should answer your questions.

Ever see the lunar rover from the Apollo missions? Did you ever happen to notice the antenna that was always pointed at earth?



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 10:52 AM
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Originally posted by Lastday Prophet sure they can HuH ? what technology do they use ?
Really, questioning tried and true radio wave technology is just silly and not the point of ATS. You obviously seem exceptionally unfamiliar with the very basics of electromagnetic wave theory and thus unable to understand the basic facts of transmission and reception. It's pointless to debate a proven technology here on ATS. I suggest you spend some time learning more about radio waves instead of running headlong down the road of confusion and error.



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 10:57 AM
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I don't think your distance theory holds up. What about my satellite TV? That we no is not bs because I am watching tv. My dish is only 18" big. How do you explain that? According to your theory, I would need a dish 3-4 feet wide.



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 11:59 AM
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I am very familiar with radio and television transmissions, I worked as a satellite technician for twenty years and know very well the limitations. The LOS ( line of sight) has nothing to do whatsoever with how far a signal can be sent, it only has reference to having a clear Line Of Sight between the satellite up in orbit and the satellite dish located on the earth. Trees, buildings and other structures can block a satellite signal therefore needing a unobstructed path between the satellite and the earth which is called "Line Of Sight" I am pretty sure I know more about this technology than most on this sight. Things like "inclined orbit" , declination, azmuth, elevation, focal lengths, noise tempertures, kelvin degrees, linear and circular polarization,transponders, A, C, KU bands and more. I am a authority on the subject and thus why I question the possibility of anyone being able to transmit a signal that distance.



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 12:03 PM
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If LOS is not important that why do we have to track (in order to use)communication satellites that are not in a stationary orbit?




[Edited on 2/4/04 by COOL HAND]



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 12:14 PM
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Originally posted by Lastday Prophet
I am a authority on the subject and thus why I question the possibility of anyone being able to transmit a signal that distance.


Okay, not trying to be offensive, but something tells me you're not.



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 12:18 PM
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Do your homework, communication satellites are in a geo-stationary orbit know as the Clark Arc. There are other satellites that are in an inclinded orbit but still Line Of Sight has reference to having a clear, unobstructed view from the satellite to the earth. That still does not answer the question of how they can transmit a signal that distance.



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 12:25 PM
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Originally posted by Lastday Prophet
Do your homework, communication satellites are in a geo-stationary orbit know as the Clark Arc. There are other satellites that are in an inclinded orbit but still Line Of Sight has reference to having a clear, unobstructed view from the satellite to the earth. That still does not answer the question of how they can transmit a signal that distance.


I have done my homework and I know what I am talking about.

Gov't sats are not all in predictable orbits. You have to be able to track one of them in order to use it to exchange information.



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 12:35 PM
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Here you go Lastday Prophet, tutorials and everything you ever wanted to know about how we communicate with space craft. Deep Space Network



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 12:37 PM
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If you have done your homework tell me what a LNA is and what is its purpose ? what is an "Inclined Orbit" what is declination, elevation,offset, and what do they have to do with transmitting a signal ?

[Edited on 2-4-2004 by Lastday Prophet]



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 01:36 PM
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Lastday Prophet, you're slightly confused as to how the whole Frequency/Wave Transmission concept. I'll explain it again and hopefully this will help.

1st. The Dish Size has to do with Reception of a Signal. A large Disk & a Small Dish only differ in their Sensitivity, which are Equal in their Ratio to each other. Meaning that if you have a Large dish it is able to 'Recieve' a signal with a lesser strength than the samller dish. However, on a small dish, you could 'Recieve' that same exact signal by adjusting the 'Sensitivity', making it Equal to the larger disk.

Example: If you have a Microphone with Low Sensitivity set directly in front of my mouth, it will Register my Voice. Or, have the same Microphone across the room with High Sensitivity and it will hear my voice also.

Another Example: You can see the 'ElectroMagnetic Radiation' (aka: Light) reflecting off an object which is a few feet in front of you with perfect clearity. You could also place the same object 500 yards away and see it just as clearly using Binoculars to Adjust the Sensitivity of the Lens which is 'Recieving' the Signal.

Chew on that for now.....I'm writing a response to your other misunderstood 'DisInformation Claims' that you talking about. (P.S. I simply cannot believe that you are or were an Expert in this field whatsoever with what you're saying so far???)



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 02:02 PM
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Originally posted by Lastday Prophet
Even the signal you recieve on a 18 inch satellite dish is uplinked by a 50 ft. dish. Further, the rover or any other machine that they have alledgedly sent to moon, mars or any other planet doesn't have any kind of dish of any size that could be used to send a signal. Take a look at the rover and tell me what component is used to send radio signals ? If there is something beyond satellite technology that they are using, what is it and how come no one has ever heard of it. The fact is that satellites are used around the world to send most signals are themselves proof of the limitations of radio and television transmissions.


The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) is an international network of antennas that provide the communication links between the scientists and engineers on Earth to the Mars Exploration Rovers in space and on Mars.

The DSN consists of three deep-space communications facilities placed approximately 120 degrees apart around the world: at Goldstone, in California's Mojave Desert; near Madrid, Spain; and near Canberra, Australia. This strategic placement permits constant observation of spacecraft as the Earth rotates on its own axis

The DSN antennas are extremely large: 34 meters (about 37 yards) and 70 meters (about 76 yards). These enormous antennas enable humans to reach out to spacecraft millions of miles away. The larger the antenna, the stronger the signal and greater the amount of information the antenna can send and receive. Each Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft carries multiple antennas used for different phases of the mission and allows it to communicate to multiple places and with other spacecraft at different speeds. The rover can choose to use four antennas: the UHF or the low-, medium-, and high-gain antennas. This capability gives the mission team several different ways to send commands and return data back to Earth.
marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov...


Do you think all of the images we get from the Hubble are fakes? Why do you believe that anything exists or is what it seems?



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 02:09 PM
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Originally posted by Lastday Prophet Things like "inclined orbit" , declination, azmuth, elevation, focal lengths, noise tempertures, kelvin degrees, linear and circular polarization,transponders, A, C, KU bands and more. I am a authority on the subject and thus why I question the possibility of anyone being able to transmit a signal that distance.
Please. Your infantile assumptions on the workings of electromagnetic waves are very telling. You'll not convince anyone here you ever did much more than aim an antenna. (I once designed antennas) It's possible to communicate to the other side of the globe on 100 milliwatts of power (I've done it). There are physics at work here that have long been unquestioned, and no longer an issue of speculation. The fact that they are being questioned reveals the nature of your familiarity with the subject.



posted on Apr, 2 2004 @ 02:11 PM
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Please have a look at "Moonbounce" - or EME (Earth-Moon-Earth Communication) here

Essentially, radio amateurs use the Moon to "bounce" signals off it. And if *they* can do it....



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