Massive object crashes over Edmonton, Canada

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posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 02:11 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
We've been hauling trash from the ISS for a while now.


So you mean we are no longer stuffing the trash into the Progress ships and dumping them in the ocean?




posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 02:39 AM
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Well now I know they spray chem trails at night. You can see a couple in the light.



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 03:57 AM
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Canada's meteor tracking stations:
All-Sky Camera Database
North American Fireball Camera Network

Meteorite Observation and Recording Program MORP

Origin of meteor ...


After examining footage of the meteor, which rocketed across the dark sky around 5:30 p.m., Florian concluded that it was a piece of rock from space left over from the formation of the solar system.

Because of the steepness and speed at which it was falling, Florian determined it could not have been a man-made object, which would have arced as it fell.


source

also
Alberta UFo Study Group



[edit on 24-11-2008 by violet]



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 07:58 AM
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I wasn't arguing that meteoric events of such magnitude are rare or unique. My point was that there were at least 3 such events over 4 days over our Northern continent, (Sacramento, New Hampshire, Edmonton). If this were something that happened all the time then I should have seen one of that brightness in my life. We all should have by now, (not regular meteors, the extremely bright ones that erase shadows). Personally, I think its a bit odd for events of this magnitude/luminousity to happen so close together. (example- Flip a coin, 50/50 its heads. Flip it 10 times, there's still a 50/50 each time that it will be heads. But what are the chances that all 10 flips will be heads? Different odds when you ask the right question.)

Ehhh, but what's the point of arguing on the internet? It is what it is.



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 09:08 AM
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An Asteroid - right!! The last time seeing an asteroid falling in, well it travelled a lot faster than that, even evaporated before getting near solid earth!!

Something else possibly as our readers suggest - might well be

www.nextagemission.com under UFO's/IFO's



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 10:06 AM
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Originally posted by Komodo
So when coming OUT of the atmosphere, and INTO our airspace, it should then already be at full burn. However as stated before, the material inside the object might not be fully ingnited then hit 'critical burn' meaning the would fully ignite causing the 'flash' effect.

Now, here's what I've pieced together, those that have seen this meteorite, say they saw it moving ACROSS the sky (as opposed to DOWN from the sky at an angle) at a LOW distance. One vid of which lit up the night as if it was flying about 500 ft off the ground.


I've actually explained the physics behind meteors, numerous times in this thread. There's no excuse for posting the clap-trap above. Please read the thread before commenting, and making yourself look foolish.




Originally posted by rapinbatsisaltherage
This is really puzzling me. Two events, both very similar, nothing found yet in either of the rural areas where the events took place but a search is ongoing. Still have yet to see any non-local news coverage of these events that were both caught on tape.


Superficially similar... had me fooled for a bit! The latter event is actually significantly brighter, but it's hard to tell from the footage.

It just goes to show how frequent these things really are.

They may never recover meteorites from either event - there are no guarantees that any survived, although the sonic booms in the event on Thursday are a strong indicator that something may have survived.


Originally posted by wrathchild
I believe that the authorities and scientist like to keep that as confusing as possible in order to keep souvenir hunters at bay.


I seriously doubt it. The chances of finding any meteorites in any event are low. They need all the help they can get to stand any chance of finding it before the weather closes in. Even if a member of the public finds it, it's better than not finding it. At least that way, there is a chance that that person will donate or sell some to the scientists for research. In cases like this, researchers are willing to pay good money for samples because meteorites are so valuable to science.

Confusing is just the nature of events like this.


Originally posted by KathyT
This web site by The American Meteor Society has a list of sightings reported. There can be more than one person, in different states, reporting the same meteor, as the times are approximate.

www.amsmeteors.org...

Even the estimates 'size' can be reported differently by different individuals.


Thanks Kathy, but you're preaching to the choir here - I'm well aware of the above. What threw me was the time of the other event, which was reported wrongly.


Originally posted by roisu
How come this video could show in TV NEWS all around the world???

isn't it just a fireball drop from the sky to the earth? shooting stars are everywhere everyday and night.


look up to the sky for more...


It's big news because it's rare for a meteor of this scale to be seen by so many people and filmed from so many angles.

I agree with you, it's not a particularly rare event - something on this scale probably happens every month or two somewhere around the world.


reply to post by zorgon
 


Hey zorgon,

FYI, that is a space-junk reentry, not a natural meteor. Most meteors don't break up like that (though it does happen sometimes - eg. Peeskill). They tend to stay in one piece, and if they do break up, it's usually 2 or three pieces that can be seen separating. Most of the time, when you see a breakup like the one in the footage you posted, it's going to be space-junk.



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by Flux8
My point was that there were at least 3 such events over 4 days over our Northern continent, (Sacramento, New Hampshire, Edmonton). If this were something that happened all the time then I should have seen one of that brightness in my life. We all should have by now, (not regular meteors, the extremely bright ones that erase shadows). Personally, I think its a bit odd for events of this magnitude/luminousity to happen so close together. (example- Flip a coin, 50/50 its heads. Flip it 10 times, there's still a 50/50 each time that it will be heads. But what are the chances that all 10 flips will be heads? Different odds when you ask the right question.)

Ehhh, but what's the point of arguing on the internet? It is what it is.



Meteors are frequent. Just because you don't see them, does not mean they are not happening all around you and all the time... you only need to turn your back for a second, and you could miss one.

First of all, you need to be outside (usually). Secondly, you need to be looking up. Thirdly it needs to be dark or getting dark as well as being relatively clear for you to stand a good chance. All of these things will increase your chances of seeing one like this, but there are no guarantees. It's a combination of luck, timing, and spending as much time as you can outside in open areas, especially when it's dark. Give it a go this week - I wouldn't be surprised if you saw one as bright as the moon if you put in 4 or 5 hours a night for 3-4 nights in a row.

How much time would you estimate you've spent looking at the sky this week?

I think a better analogy than flipping one coin would be to have a handful of them which is thrown on the table, and then see which is heads or tails.

Anyway, I have seen at least 2 or three fireballs that cast shadows on the ground (not on quite the same scale as this event though), but I do spend allot of time looking when there are likely to be fireballs around.

3 or 4 events in the same area, around the same time, is nothing strange. Remember, only one of the events was seen by many many people, and that was an exceptional event with exceptionally good timing to be seen by many. The other 2 or three events were hardly noticed by anyone, as usually happens. If it was not for the major event, hardly anyone would know about them, which is the way it usually is, because most people miss even the large events. This is well known by meteor observers.

Most people are busy doing other things, and not looking up at the sky. The majority will never see a meteor like this in their lifetime. Few if any get to see two as bright as this. The lucky few, either just happened to be looking at the right place and in the right location at the right time, or they are the type to spend hours on end every night looking at the sky.

Edit to expand a bit more on what I said, and for clarity.

[edit on 24-11-2008 by C.H.U.D.]



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 11:28 AM
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Originally posted by Flux8 If this were something that happened all the time then I should have seen one of that brightness in my life.


Well let me help you...


Name Date of Peak Moon Phase
Quadrantids January 4, morning Crescent, rises 4-5 a.m.
Lyrids night of April 21/22 almost Full
Eta Aquarids May 5, morning/evening New Moon
Perseids August 12, morning Sets around 2 a.m.
Orionids October 21, morning Rises around 1 a.m.
Leonids November 17, morning Rises late evening
Geminids December 13, evening Full Moon


What are meteor showers?

An increase in the number of meteors at a particular time of year is called a meteor shower.

Comets shed the debris that becomes most meteor showers. As comets orbit the Sun, they shed an icy, dusty debris stream along the comet's orbit. If Earth travels through this stream, we will see a meteor shower. Depending on where Earth and the stream meet, meteors appear to fall from a particular place in the sky, maybe within the neighborhood of a constellation.

Meteor showers are named by the constellation from which meteors appear to fall, a spot in the sky astronomers call the radiant. For instance, the radiant for the Leonid meteor shower is located in the constellation Leo. The Perseid meteor shower is so named because meteors appear to fall from a point in the constellation Perseus.


stardate.org...

So when Dec 15th rolls around grab some warm clothes and go outside at night and look up. Can't guarantee you will see a big one but if there is one in the pack, you will see it.

Best thing is to get away from city lights, and a clear view of the whole sky. We use a garden lounge and just lie back looking up. If you do a slow circular scan around the center of the sky your eyes natural motion sensitivity at the peripheral vision will pick up any on the fringes.

A good shower will generate 10 good ones in an hour and many small ones...

We go up to Haloran Summit here just outside Vegas its at 4800 feet, no lights and no pollution

[edit on 24-11-2008 by zorgon]



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 01:29 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Good advice


But, the Geminids peak is actually on the night/morning of the 13th/14th, not the 15th.

I'll be posting a thread on them in the Space Exploration forum soon


[edit on 24-11-2008 by C.H.U.D.]



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 02:09 PM
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Don't know if this was posted already but it appears that the MSM finally decided they would run this story.... This is one of the reasons I love ATS. I can get real-time news updates in seconds as compared to days by the MSM....

www.msnbc.msn.com...



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by ExistenceUnknown
 


Cool article, states:


Meteor ranks among the top displays of the decade, expert says


I have no doubts. That's why I complained about zero coverage from the non-local news. Thank you so much for posting.



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 02:28 PM
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reply to post by internos
 


You forgot about the most important video of all... This one:

From minut 1.11 to 1.14




Had to say it



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 06:57 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon
Just found this one... An awesome display...




Just to set the record straight - that is not a natural meteor.

It is a Russian booster reentering the atmosphere. It just happened to be at the same time as the Quadrantid meteor shower, which peaked around the 3rd/4th January 2007.

Russian Rocket Looks Like Meteor Shower

Space junk blazes through Western skies

Fireball over Colorado



What early risers in Colorado and Wyoming thought was a fiery pre-dawn meteor shower today was actually the break-up and re-entry of a Russian-made rocket that launched a French space telescope into orbit last week, our USA TODAY colleague Patrick O'Driscoll writes from Denver

Source: Piece of Russian-made rocket lands in Wyoming


The Quadrantids on the other hand, like the meteors of most other cometary meteor showers, appear as discrete streaks (see vids in link) in the sky, and are usually very fast, unlike space-junk. They also do not break up like space junk - it's rare to see cometary meteors break up in that fashion - more often than not they self-destruct in a very bright flash.

Harder objects like asteroids (eg the topic of this thread) can also produce flashes when they break apart/fragment, but as I said before, it tends to be only 2 or 3 bits at a time, and it really looks anything like space-junk although there are exceptions like the Peeskill fireball.



Originally posted by zorgon
But you really have to turn off the volume... these guys are so stupid it hurts...


Oh the irony...



[edit on 24-11-2008 by C.H.U.D.]



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 07:53 PM
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CHUD,

"Remember, only one of the events was seen by many many people, and that was an exceptional event with exceptionally good timing to be seen by many. The other 2 or three events were hardly noticed by anyone, as usually happens. If it was not for the major event, hardly anyone would know about them, which is the way it usually is, because most people miss even the large events. This is well known by meteor observers. "


There were at least two magnificent events, each just as bright as the other. The meteor above the Sacramento area happened at ~5:30 in the afternoon, Nov. 18 and was seen as far away as Modesto during daylight hours. It split apart as it approached the ground. People on the freeway saw it during peak traffic. My father in law saw it for himself as did many others. www.kcra.com...
"...Hardly noticed by anyone..."???
It was just as bright as the one over Edmonton on Nov. 21. Also, another poster claimed there was a 3rd meteor seen over New Hampshire on Nov. 19 and it, too, was incredibly bright.


"Meteors are frequent. Just because you don't see them, does not mean they are not happening all around you and all the time... you only need to turn your back for a second, and you could miss one."

Miss one? I was nearly hit by one, relatively speaking, LOL! I see meteors all the time, my whole life. Saw a couple last night. I've had a meteor fly ~100 ft from me. I saw the small fireball with flaming tail flash right in front of me. I heard the whoosh. I felt the heat wave as it passed. But I guess that happens all the time, too.
And I thought twister dodgin' was a dangerous sport!



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 09:03 PM
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Originally posted by Flux8
others. www.kcra.com...
"...Hardly noticed by anyone..."???
It was just as bright as the one over Edmonton on Nov. 21. Also, another poster claimed there was a 3rd meteor seen over New Hampshire on Nov. 19 and it, too, was incredibly bright.


Well yes, in comparison to the event on the 20th.

The point I was trying to make was, that usually people don't see these things unless they get lucky once or twice in their lives. Sure they occurred over the same area roughly, but it's unlikely that any individual got to see more that two of them. Like most rules, there are exceptions, and perhaps 1 lucky guy was looking in the right place and the right time to see all of them.



Originally posted by Flux8
Miss one? I was nearly hit by one, relatively speaking, LOL! I see meteors all the time, my whole life. Saw a couple last night. I've had a meteor fly ~100 ft from me. I saw the small fireball with flaming tail flash right in front of me. I heard the whoosh. I felt the heat wave as it passed. But I guess that happens all the time, too.
And I thought twister dodgin' was a dangerous sport!


Sounds good to me! Whenever there are fireballs, it tends to be cloudy here, in recent times at least! I think theres a conspiracy there


You can be pretty certain that a "glowing" meteor will never come anywhere near you. Meteors are all illusion.

By the way, it's very possible that you did hear the meteor - see:

Listening to Leonids
Electrophonic Sounds from Bolides

Spooky when you hear one isn't it?!



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 09:12 PM
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THe NAtional , Canadian nightly 10PM news broke for a commercial but they had a teaser about the meteor. I'll post any updates I learn from the story....2 minutes to go...
The search is now on.....they showed the popular vids.....by comparing vids they think it landed near Manitou Lake. THat's it.

Manitou Lake Saskatchewan .

[edit on 24-11-2008 by venividivici]



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 10:04 PM
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They are looking in the wrong place. It will be by the Manitoba border. That is my thought anyway.



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 11:28 PM
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Its funny how so many people saw this unusual event that no one took time to take a photo of this thing falling or even the lit up night sky.



posted on Nov, 24 2008 @ 11:45 PM
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I saw it while working on the out skirts of town in Regina, Sk. There was next to nothing for light poluttion out there. It was to the north and heading west. Just for a size refference take a nickel and hold it arms length from your face. That was about the size of the ball at the front and the tail was about 8 or nine inches longer. It did turn a few different colours which struck me as odd, but the green colour is what is most vibrant in my memory. I almost expected to see a flash on the horizon and a shock wave to hit when it landed because it seemed so close. I was really awe inspirering and reminded me of a movie. Sorry that's about the best desciption I can give. I've been a fan of this site for quite a few years but this is the first time I've posted anything.
Sask. Riders Fan



posted on Nov, 25 2008 @ 02:25 AM
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By the way, it's very possible that you did hear the meteor


I am one of those people who can 'hear' them... And it's something when you try to describe it. "You can *hear* meteors. Did you have your meds today?"

I don't know the exact science- and the one article I did read on it made my head explode from the density. All I know is my ears say it sounds like Roman candles going over.

I Also learned not to tell anyone with the IQ of a tomato sandwich about stuff like that. ;-)





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