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energy in space?

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posted on Nov, 4 2008 @ 01:19 AM
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just a quick thought i had...
Would it be possibe in the vaccum of space to create easy energy and electricity with a simple crank type ,mechanism like you have seen light lightbulbs and things of that sort?
without the drag of the atmosphere would it be possible to keep cranks in coninuous motion with very very little force but producing large amounts of energy over long peoiods of time? and couldnt we possibility expand on the little to no drag ideas to produce energy?
or am i just dreaming this up?




posted on Nov, 4 2008 @ 02:12 AM
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I think you might be misunderstanding the physics of crank style objects. While true there would be less resistance of the typical types, there would still be resistance from the gears rubbing against one another and so forth. However, it might have practical applications in magnetic energy production. Good train of thought though!



posted on Nov, 4 2008 @ 02:32 AM
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Originally posted by mrbule
just a quick thought i had...
Would it be possibe in the vaccum of space to create easy energy and electricity with a simple crank type ,mechanism like you have seen light lightbulbs and things of that sort?
without the drag of the atmosphere would it be possible to keep cranks in coninuous motion with very very little force but producing large amounts of energy over long peoiods of time? and couldnt we possibility expand on the little to no drag ideas to produce energy?
or am i just dreaming this up?


The drag of the atmosphere is more or less negligible in a generator. The resistance is mostly caused by back EMF - the direct result of using the electricity from the generator - and mechanical friction. Even if you eliminate mechanical friction inside the generator (which is actually more difficult in space, since oil and grease evaporate in the vacuum) you'd still use power.

Assuming a 100% efficient generator with frictionless bearings and lossless wires powering a load with a power factor of exactly 1, you'd still have to put as much energy into the generator as the load is using, due to the very nature of electrical generators.

If you weren't powering a load, the frictionless, 100% efficient generator would spin just as easily as an equivalently massive flywheel on frictionless bearings.

In other words, a generator providing any given amount of power will cause at least that amount of mechanical resistance to turning, which will require at least that amount of power constantly to turn. You can put it in space, underwater, in the sun, whatever; it will still require constant energy input to provide a constant energy output.

So: No. not at all.



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