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Too many soldiers in new care centers

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posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 01:37 PM
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Too many soldiers in new care centers


news.yahoo.com

FORT CAMPBELL, Ky. – In a rush to correct reports of substandard care for wounded soldiers, the Army flung open the doors of new specialized treatment centers so wide that up to half the soldiers currently enrolled do not have injuries serious enough to justify being there, The Associated Press has learned.

Army leaders are putting in place stricter screening procedures to stem the flood of patients overwhelming the units — a move that eventually will target some for closure.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 01:37 PM
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I really don't get this.

The gist of this article seemed to be that the military only feels that it should provide for the most critically injured soldiers and do nothing to provide for those with comparatively minor injuries or who need continuing treatment.

What the # are those guys supposed to do, when they can't work for the military and presumably can't get a job to foot the cost themselves?

Why the # are we giving bailout money to corrupt banks, and saying that those men and women who are injured protecting America from the supposidly huge terrorist theats are clogging up medical centers if they dare to ask for war-wound treatment?

news.yahoo.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 01:59 PM
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asmeone2;

Thank You for posting this story. I live about 10 miles from Ft. Campbell. I have also been a guest of the V.A. for many years. The really weird thing is that I do not see many wounded soldiers here in town. The 101st is not all back yet.

I have also talked to many G.I.s whose medical paperwork was "lost" prior to deployment even when the higher-ups knew that they were non-deployable. Now the Army finds itself bending over backwards to make sure it does not happen as much, so alot of the troops are being treated with little or no documentation.

The biggest problem with the troops is the time delay from getting out of the army to the time they start recieving benefits from the V.A. or the Army, so this is kind of like a stop-gap measure.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 03:08 PM
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I spent 6 days in the Temple VA Hospital earlier this year and ran into a few of the young men that were wounded or suffering from other service connected ailments. .... My heart went out to one guy that was trying to seek out treatment for a lung condition. He was pretty much told that was crazy, and denied treatment, though he had showed me the scars from surgery to remove part of one of his lungs..... I have noticed that the doctors will in one way or the other find some way to blame the patient if the treatment or medications don't work, and ignore them. .... It isn't right that people will cover their cars with magnets and bumper stickers claiming to, support the troops, but look down on the veterans, and regard them as cry babies and a tax liability.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 03:15 PM
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hyper;

I know exactly what you mean. Unfortunately the army tells the troops to go through the VA for their care. The VA will do everything in its power to reduce costs and treatment. The best thing for soldiers getting out is to go through the Disabled American Veterans organizations or maybe even the VFW.

I have had the best luck through the DAV. Their sole purpose is to help veterans get the benefits and care they deserve. Pass it along to everyone you know. The VA will not help.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 04:11 PM
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I am a life time member of the D.A.V. but I had problems with one of the post commanders that turned out to have been discharged from the Army with a G.D. and wasn't even a service connected disabled vet. A rep. at the regional office got me 100% in less than 3 weeks...... Until my health got too bad I worked as a weekend volunteer on a P.T.S.D. unit as a direct care worker, and recreational therapist, though I am not certified as one. I would do anything to help these guys if I still could.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by capgrup
 


I think we have only seen the tip of the iceberg on how the armed forces are trying to cut costs by shrifing medical care



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 09:40 PM
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I have wondered for a long time what would have happened to Vietnam Vets if Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton had not been elected.... We got shafted by the Republican administrations, and disabled Vets that were treated for non service connected conditions had to start making co payments on medications unless they were rated at 100%, since Bush 41. .... I like the way that the young veterans are organizing to call attention to the wrongs that are going on here and abroad. .... I can't help but think that the VA Health Care System, and other programs will improve under a Democratic administration. The system is backed up much more than it has been since the 1980s.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 09:55 PM
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Hypervigelant:

Thank you for your response. I hope very much that conditions will improve regardless of who gets into office. Of course it would be best if we got out of the war, period.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 10:15 PM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 



Why the # are we giving bailout money to corrupt banks, and saying that those men and women who are injured protecting America from the supposidly huge terrorist theats are clogging up medical centers if they dare to ask for war-wound treatment?


Excellent statement. It is a disgusting example of where we are as a country right now.

Like you said, this is just the tip of the iceberg.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 10:23 PM
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The thing that disgusts me about the war even more than the false premise is that TPTB appear to want to fight it only superficially.

Their strategy appears to be "Let's throw some bombs, do some patrols, and (it seems to be now) terrorize some citizens."

They treat the men and woman actually doing the fighting little better than the 'enemy.' The only difference is which side of the gun they are on.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:28 PM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 

This war isn't a whole lot different than the war that was fought in the more populated areas in Vietnam..... The guys nowadays seem to drive around a lot more now though, but patrolling in an area full of civilians is really just exposing yourself as bait until someone gets blown away. When that happens everyone becomes a possible target.... I am so thankful that I was in the mountainous jungle on the DMZ, and never had to decide who was or wasn't a target. .... The guys in Iraq are being exposed to some terrible things that will haunt them forever.... I read on a medical site that there is now a study being done, that advocates cortisol injections as a precautionary measure to prevent P.T.S.D. .... Ending the damned war would a lot safer measure of prevention, for all involved..... The last sentence of your last post, is so very true, very sad, but very true.... The war itself disgust me.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by hypervigilant
 


One thing our commanders should have learned from very recent warfar is that you can not engage an unfamiliar enemy in gurilla tactics on his home turf and expect to win.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:33 PM
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Unless you have rank your just another horse, and you gotta keep winning to survive. Well the american army anyway. Up here in cold beautiful canada we take care of our armed forces members.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by Retikx
 


And to your credit, you don't fight in near as many wars and to the horrific extent that we do.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 


with the us budget.. they could build 2 more hospitals twice as big for pocket change. and dont try to tell me otherwise because there are BILLIONS of wasted dollars every year on stupid #. The men and women who fight for your country deserve the BEST treatment and conditions,period



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:46 PM
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reply to post by Retikx
 


I don't disagree at all. I made the very point you did in my OP. The care of the men and women on the front lines should be number one, but our military commanders seem to think of them as inanimate peices on a huge Stratego board.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 


I was astounded 40 years ago when a CH-46 pilot was upset about not being able to drop a net of C-Rats on a tight hilltop L.Z. due to a load dropped in its center, by a previous load moments before, told me it cost the government $400.00 an hour to operate his helicopter. I guess that it would cost 20 times that much today. .... That amount was almost 2 1/2 months pay for me at the time. .... At the time of my release from duty, my 10% VA disability income was $20.00 a month. .... The cost of war increases at about 4 times the rate that VA comp does... The war materiel contractors prosper and the combatant is ignored, or gets a piddly check and years of standing in line at V.A. hospitals.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 03:13 PM
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When I look at all the billions of dollars spent on this war, I cannot fathom where it all goes! You want to tel me you can't ground that helecopter for an hour or two? Since there's no insurance middle-man to pay off that $400 or $800 or more would probably keep 3 or 4 non-critical soldiers OK for a month!



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 11:50 PM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 

Actually the guy was upset over a wait of 1 or 2 minutes tops, to clear the L.Z.... The only times I ever saw a Marine chopper set down and shut down in the field, it was being occupied by by 3Rd.Marine Division Commanding General Ray Davis, while I was on a patrol with his son's platoon..... The fine man brought us our Thanksgiving Dinner, and was nice enough to serve it to us. He was the best of the best..... This event was one of my favorite memories of my tour, and there were a couple of others that involved him as well..... He wouldn't approve of this war or the way our combatants with medical needs are being neglected.... If all of the leaders in the Corps were like him, it would have been my pleasure to be a lifer.....Back to the VA.... When I was making the co payments for medication, the paperwork I received listed the price of the medication that was paid by the VA, and it was a small fraction of what I would have paid in a drugstore. .... I am pleased by the treatment that I now receive, but the staff members nurses and doctors are working much harder than they were from 93 through 2000, and aren't always in a good mood at the end of the work week.... They make it hard to get medical benefits and compensation by continuous denial of claims, in effort to make you give up, commit suicide or die..... It take a briefcase full of records at a hearing that will occur after numerous denials.... Letters from doctors, social workers, friends, family, employers, and maybe a congressman, is how it gets done, and it will take years. I was told that I couldn't work in 83 and finally got 100% disability in 95.... If I had gotten treatment starting at the time of my release from duty and had known the seriousness of my condition, I would probably still be working instead of eating pain medication 3 or more times a day. I talked to a guy recently that just had his leg amputated for injuries received 37 years ago, but he got in years before me and received treatment and worked till retirement. I hope these guys are given a break, meds, physical therapy, social services, and medical treatment so that they can go on to be productive and proud.



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