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Large Piece Of Space Junck; Impact Imminent!!

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posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:02 AM
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Largest Ever Piece of Space Station Junk to Hit Earth Today November 2nd



don't think i've heard anything about this till now..


The Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) photographed on July 23rd, 2007, by ISS astronauts. Watch your heads, it's re-entering tomorrow! (NASA)


Source

peace all and watch your head

daz__

[edit on 2/11/2008 by daz__]




posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:20 AM
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The Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) weighs 1400 lb (635 kg), is the size of two refrigerators and it's going to drop through the atmosphere some time tomorrow (Sunday, Nov. 2nd).

Wow.
I'm surprised they wouldn't blow this up or something like they did to that satellite.
This is what im referring to



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:22 AM
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sorry i havnt read the link yet

but does where abouts on earth its most likely to hit



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:22 AM
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That's odd, but Nasa is keeping a close eye on it. Nothing to big to worry about just watch your heads.

-Ign0RaNt



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:24 AM
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At the moment, every continent except Antarctica has some favorable ground tracks.

They don't know...

Looks like nasa dropped the ball on this one.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:28 AM
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hmmm think im going to wear an extra thick wooly hat tomorrow


quite un-nerving really, especially as i think i have a mild form of Keraunothnetophobia (the fear of falling satellites)

knowing my luck it will land on my car in a packed car park



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:34 AM
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Hmm i remember last time there was something like this, And there was an online tracking system, Might be worth looking in to and see if we can predict a path lol.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:44 AM
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Originally posted by Briles
hmmm think im going to wear an extra thick wooly hat tomorrow



It's supposed to drop on november 2nd according to that report.
So by tomorrow your car will already be flattened.
jk
Holy crap chicken little was right! run forrest run!
lol

[edit on 2-11-2008 by ashamedamerican]



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:45 AM
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This thing doesn't seem larger than Sky Lab which I was under the impression re-entered decades back.

Some Wiki stuff.


The 100 ton space station was in Earth's orbit from 1973 to 1979,

Increased solar activity, heating the outer layers of the Earth's atmosphere and thereby increasing drag on Skylab, led to an early reentry at approximately 16:37 UTC 11 July 1979. In the weeks leading up to the reentry, ground controllers had re-established contact with the six year old vehicle, and were able to adjust its attitude for optimal reentry dynamics. Earth reentry footprint was a narrow band (approx. 4° wide) beginning at about [show location on an interactive map] 48°S 87°E / -48, 87 and ending at about [show location on an interactive map] 12°S 144°E / -12, 144, an area covering portions of the Indian Ocean and Western Australia. Debris was found between Esperance and Rawlinna, 31–34°S, 122–126°E. The Shire of Esperance fined the United States $400 for littering, a fine which, to this day, remains unpaid



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:48 AM
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reply to post by roadgravel
 


lol at the fines from the shire of Esperence

Shame they couldn't blame skylab for the lead contamination throughout the town



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:52 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


Sounds like a quite reasonable fee that was assessed. Guess bargaining with terrorists or for space junk litter is always off the table.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by roadgravel
 


It's probably in the hand book

*Will not negotiate with terrorists
*Will not UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCE pay a littering fine



Back on topic: Why don't they use it for a bit of target practice?



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 12:01 PM
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just think what a chunk of that could do to an airplane. it would be a perfect cover for a missile attack on an airplane. such a shame just two days before election.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by Velvet Death
 


I'm not a mathmetician but I would have to assume that the odds of that hitting a moving plane in flight traveling at hundreds of miles per hour, would be lower than being hit by lightning 2 or 3 times in the same spot. lol

[edit on 2-11-2008 by ashamedamerican]



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by roadgravel


The Shire of Esperance fined the United States $400 for littering, a fine which, to this day, remains unpaid


In defense of the United States they did go and pick up their litter.


This sort of debris re-enters the atmosphere on a very regular basis. Everything from intentionally de-orbited satellites, spent rocket bodies, tools, discarded spacesuits, and all other manner of human junk.

With the Earth being only 25% land mass most of this falls harmlessly into the oceans, but even so, I don't think a single human has ever been killed of injured by falling man made debris.

This older article might be of interest to some...


New data compiled by the Aerospace Corporation's Center for Orbital and Reentry Debris Studies (CORDS) in El Segundo, California found that over 425,000 pounds (193,000 kilograms) of material reentered Earth's atmosphere in 1999.

"We believe that 84,000 pounds (38,000 kilograms) of that total survived reentry," said William Ailor, director of CORDS.

www.space.com...


If you are worried though,
DUCK AND COVER..........



[edit on 2/11/2008 by anxietydisorder]



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by anxietydisorder
With the Earth being only 25% land mass most of this falls harmlessly into the oceans, but even so, I don't think a single human has ever been killed of injured by falling man made debris.


A person would have to quite unlucky. I suppose being the first human target might bring celebrity status to a person, assuming survival.

I'm interested in finding out if anyone gets to see it re-enter.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 02:43 PM
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Originally posted by ashamedamerican



At the moment, every continent except Antarctica has some favorable ground tracks.

They don't know...

Looks like nasa dropped the ball on this one.


Hah, for the first time in a long time I'm actually glad I live in the country closest to the coldest continent.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 03:39 PM
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The final hours of the large chunk of space debris are being closely tracked by NASA and the U.S. Space Surveillance Network as a precaution.


I don't understand, why isn't nasa telling us where they think it will hit? Just a question.

Maybe it can hit my car that way nasa can pay for a new one.



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 06:21 PM
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Well, this is what's coming in.





And fair warning:


Mike Suffredini, NASA's space station program manager, warns, "If anybody found a piece of anything on the ground Monday morning, I would hope they wouldn't get too close to it." After all, should any of the toxic ammonia stored inside the EAS survive re-entry, it could pose a health risk. (Having said that, I would think a man-made meteorite traveling at 100 mph would also be considered a "health risk,"

www.universetoday.com...

Anyone have an update on trajectory yet ?



posted on Nov, 2 2008 @ 06:59 PM
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like the man said.. impossible to tell where this thing will come down or its a miricle they can even tell what day it will come down..

dz



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