It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Calling UK/EU Members-What do the US Elections mean to Us?

page: 1
1
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 05:11 AM
link   
The time is nearly upon us and soon there will be a new president of the US.Since there is alot of coverage of the election in the UK , and some very interesting and scary thread titles ,I was wondering-What do the elections mean to us in the UK and EU?

Lets face it ,this is the most important election ever for the US.With the world economy in crisis and the prospect of the first black president and black first lady.The issues are many - domestic ,foriegn and cultural etc
But do we feel the issues will affect us?

I think may people in the UK would like to see Obama elected.Not only because he is black and it will break tradition of rich ,white men running the show ,it will ruffle alot of feathers.I also get the impression he is a competent leader.At least he's articulate.Sarah Palin seems to be a bit of a joke and a non -entity ,at least thats the general feeling.Mc Cain seems to be a bit over the hill,hence the fear of Palin taking office.

So,who would be good for us Brits -Obama or Mc Cain?
Considering the deaths of 15 Paras that were serving in Afghanistan was marked by parade in the town to honour them,it's timely.




posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 05:15 AM
link   
www.guardian.co.uk...


good comprehensive coverage above



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 05:36 AM
link   
In my view, Obama is the man for the job. I think the alternative is a terrible thought. McCain is just another Bush to me, and Palin is quite meaningless (though I personally find her objectionable, false, unprofessional and potentially dangerous).

It is vital for the UK because of our ties with America. I wish those ties were not so binding, but they are. In this world of globalization, slightly more isolationist ideals are becoming more appealing to me.
I'm not saying we should step back entirely and cut ourselves off from each other, I just think the balance is not right the way we are. I hope Obama changes foreign policy enough to help with that small distance I think we need.

I think the current financial crisis shows that we are all too interdependent. I barely know the basics of the current financial system (I can barely keep track of the change in my pocket :lol
but I am sure lessons can be learned from it, and I'm certain that one of those lessons is that we need to be more conscious of the risks of global markets.
I don't think McCain would change that at all.

I am also very in favor of taxing the mega-rich to the hilt. When you have so much money that you could never utilize it all, while others starve, something needs to be done. I have never been one for inequality and injustice, and I see some of the wealthiest people on Earth sitting on incredible wealth while others die because they don't have clean drinking water...

Regardless of political leanings and their associated labels, that is simply wrong.
I think (and hope) that electing Obama might start the ball rolling to create and encourage true equality and improve the way of life for the masses instead of just helping the rich.

Maybe I'm just naive, but I think there is more chance of great change with Obama than McCain..



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 05:50 AM
link   
Interesting reply.It appears that alot of people are putting their faith in Obama to make things right.He's the black Kennedy but will he renew peoples faith in politics ?

www.timesonline.co.uk...



I agree with you that we are very tied to the US militarily and I think that maybe this will be a major concern to Brits etc

I don't know if isolationsim is the way to go but I agree with you about the disgrace of people that are without the basics of life sufferring while the super -rich bask in luxury.But I feel there is an important factor to remember here.Sometimes money and resources don't reach the people who are starving becauase of local ,corrupt leaders who cream it off for themselves.Also foriegn outside influence can topple country into war and poverty.But we've got start somewhere ,even if the Illuminati exists or not.
Should we put our faith in poiticians?Also if Obama started to reaLly make a difference will he meet the same fate as JFK?



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 06:13 AM
link   
I'd really like to think otherwise, but in all honesty I don't think it'll matter, and I don't think anything will change. Both men are products of multi-million dollar marketing campaigns. They're walking talking adverts for an ideal that just doesn't exist. Every word, opinion, gesture we see is the result of focus group studies and millions poured into marketing and psychology to see what pushes peoples' buttons. None of it's real or heartfelt. Just like everything else the American media churns out, the men we see on tele may as well have been created in Pixar's studios.

If the financial crisis and the West's foreign policy over the last 7 years has taught us anything at all, it's that the principle power brokers in the US (and the world) are military hawks, big business and banks, who are motivated by self-interest, narrow-minded world views and dogma. George Bush, though I'm sure he was a nice bloke, was a puppet to them and I'm sure the next incumbent will be as well.

I will be delighted if I'm proved wrong, but at this stage I'm extremely cynical of anything I see and hear these people say. Successive American administrations have squandered the opportunities to build world peace offered by history since the Berlin Wall came down and every year that goes by they make things worse.



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 06:14 AM
link   
I doubt it means much overall economically, the US has lost its grip on the World.

The only influence the US still has over the world is the whole 'war' thing.

McCain is in my opinion, unfit for politics. From a perspective on this side of the water, McCain/Palin looks like a joke that has been planted to lose the election. How can any sane minded person vote for them - I know half of the US is clinically insane by our standards but COME ON!!

Obama is a tricky one, he is either sincere or an actor, hard to call.
If he is elected, his policies on US corporations will hurt Ireland because of this country's close ties to the US. Also, if he is elected, I can see another false flag that will drag the world into an even bigger conflict.

Glad i'm not American.



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 06:41 AM
link   
Errmm...UK is apart of the European Union btw (the title concludes we are not.)

In a recent opinion poll carried out across the European Union, the British were the least interested in the US election. I've never been fascinated by Obama - I found him quite vulgar, lumpen and Blair like.

As for McCain;a very repugnant man. He comes across as extremely ambivalent and contradictory - a moderate, yet trying to please conservatives
Sarah Palin is highly attractive, but guns, Jesus and "drill baby, drill" resulted in psychological damage to the audience - don't forget the annoying voice too.

After careful analysis, a sensible conclusion is Joe Biden cannot be described - in a positive manner - by any words in the English language. For someone who is portrayed and depicted as a herculean politician, his foreign policy credentials are equivalent to a Student Union officer.


sty

posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 06:51 AM
link   
I am from Eastern Europe , living in UK at the moment. In my view, the US election = scam, in order to keep people occupied and to give the impression of choice. The presidents are SELECTED not elected, and my believe is that nomatter who wins, the agenda is quite the same. Every 4 years, the same scam , same "vote for change" slogans , however the same politica line ! Last democrat - Clinton - avoided to arrest Osama , created NAFTA etc. Bush continued. Actually they are good friends, they work for the same master. It would be interesting to know who is really leading the US !



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 06:53 AM
link   
Thanks Mattpryor and Dermo -all good points.We probably have been conned into thinking politics makes a difference.It was a good point about focus groups etc .

So with Mc Cain being most unsiutable is this a set up?If so then this suggests a conspiracy and throw big biz ,miltary and the Establishment and you've got the New World Order etc

But this the crux of the problem .How do we take power then from the powers that be if we believe them to be totally corrupt etc?

So,if we take the premise that whoever gets in is a puppet and the elections are rigged etc where do we go from here?

OR do we really believe?I have problems believing that Obama is a cut &dried conspiracy as you to take the African American factor.With all this talk of blood on the streets if Obama does win and ditto if he does'nt it seems like South Central etc will be rioting come what may.Whether this is cointelpro or psyops to scare people you do have to look at the evidence of the past ie;LA riots and the Rodney King trial.



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 07:02 AM
link   

Originally posted by infinite
Errmm...UK is apart of the European Union btw (the title concludes we are not.)

In a recent opinion poll carried out across the European Union, the British were the least interested in the US election. I've never been fascinated by Obama - I found him quite vulgar, lumpen and Blair like.

As for McCain;a very repugnant man. He comes across as extremely ambivalent and contradictory - a moderate, yet trying to please conservatives
Sarah Palin is highly attractive, but guns, Jesus and "drill baby, drill" resulted in psychological damage to the audience - don't forget the annoying voice too.

After careful analysis, a sensible conclusion is Joe Biden cannot be described - in a positive manner - by any words in the English language. For someone who is portrayed and depicted as a herculean politician, his foreign policy credentials are equivalent to a Student Union officer.



Thank You ,I am aware UK is in EU (HA .HA) I was being inclusive of our European brethren,Y'see not everyone feels European so...
Could you post a link to this poll please..myself I don't see it .I think there s alot of interest across the board in the elections....but from your post I see you are unimpressed by any of the candidates.I don't understand how you could find Obama lumpen though?



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 07:06 AM
link   

Originally posted by sty
I am from Eastern Europe , living in UK at the moment. In my view, the US election = scam, in order to keep people occupied and to give the impression of choice. The presidents are SELECTED not elected, and my believe is that nomatter who wins, the agenda is quite the same. Every 4 years, the same scam , same "vote for change" slogans , however the same politica line ! Last democrat - Clinton - avoided to arrest Osama , created NAFTA etc. Bush continued. Actually they are good friends, they work for the same master. It would be interesting to know who is really leading the US !


From what you've described Sty I see you are a fully paid up member of the Conspiracy Club.I've heard the stuff about Clinton and the Bushes being buddies many times.So,the elections mean no change for you then jsut a continuance of scam.



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 07:25 AM
link   
reply to post by detachedindividual
 


The one thing that never changes, no matter which party is in power, is US foreign policy. My idealistic side would believe that Obama can change it, my realist side thinks that mainstream political parties don't pick candidates who are going to rock the boat.

John McCain and Sarah Palin represent more of the same Bushist politics. He is far too old and she comes across like a character from Desperate Housewives. The lights are on but nobody is home. On the other hand Barack Obama's campaign is equally vacuous with his empty slogans about "Change" - changing what exactly? It's heart-warming rhetoric isn't it?

On a lighter note, can I ask all Americans to bombard their media with requests for 24/7 coverage of the next British general election. I really must insist, that you, as a matter of reciprocal courtesy and in accordance with the 'special relationship', subject yourselves to night after night of tedious analysis of the minutae of our political campaigns. If you haven't watched a British party political broadcast, you haven't lived



[edit on 31-10-2008 by Dan.Dare]



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 07:35 AM
link   

Originally posted by Dan.Dare
reply to post by detachedindividual
 


The one thing that never changes, no matter which party is in power, is US foreign policy. My idealistic side would believe that Obama can change it, my realist side thinks that mainstream political parties don't pick candidates who are going to rock the boat.

John McCain and Sarah Palin represent more of the same Bushist politics. He is far too old and she comes across like a character from Desperate Housewives. The lights are on but nobody is home. On the other hand Barack Obama's campaign is equally vacuous with his empty slogans about "Change" - changing what exactly? It's heart-warming rhetoric isn't it?

On a lighter note, can I ask all Americans to bombard their media with requests for 24/7 coverage of the next British general election. I really must insist, that you, as a matter of reciprocal courtesy and in accordance with the 'special relationship', subject yourselves to night after night of tedious analysis of the minutae of our political campaigns. If you haven't watched a British party political broadcast, you haven't lived



[edit on 31-10-2008 by Dan.Dare]
I like it!At least the Monster Raving Looney Party would make it watchable otherwise I think they'd be bored to death.One advantage of being a capitalist country I suppose lots of flags and expensive razamatazz.Interesting sentiments Dan.I think most peoples idealist side is at work during elections .I suppose it's because hope springs eternal.No wonder so many people are cynical about politics-is this the price we pay for democracy?



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 07:35 AM
link   
From here in the US; our media seems to indicate that most of you support (or would prefer) Senator Obama win the Presidential election.

In general it also appears that the EU is so inclined.

Out of curiosity..., how does your local political or governmental leadership say they see it?



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 07:36 AM
link   
One positive thing about both candidates is there ability to speak the english language properly, so its a win win situation when george w is gone



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 07:42 AM
link   

Originally posted by Maxmars
From here in the US; our media seems to indicate that most of you support (or would prefer) Senator Obama win the Presidential election.

In general it also appears that the EU is so inclined.

Out of curiosity..., how does your local political or governmental leadership say they see it?


Obama is more popular in Ireland but Ron Paul has massive support.



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 07:51 AM
link   
reply to post by Maxmars
 


I think you're right Max.I think Mc Cain is a bit too Grand Old Party for most Brits and they don't find Palin very credible or they can't fathom her out as she is a)Attractive-don't forget politics is showbiz for ugly people -the hearest equivalent we have is Ann Widdecombe-much as I love Widders she aint no oil painting.B)Goes hunting moose with a big gun-not many of us can relate or understand this.C)Proved she does'nt keep up with current/ world affairs in a tv interveiw(does not bode well for a potential VP in an international crisis).I'm not sure if our party leaders are allowed to express their preferences pubicly but I will have a look for you.



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 07:54 AM
link   
reply to post by Saoirse
 


That's interesting ,Ron Paul has alot of support .Can you tell us why?I'll miss Bush and his Bushim's.His speech about humans and fish living together in peace restored my faith in humanity.
Ireland for Obama-cool.



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 08:03 AM
link   
Surprisingly(or not)The Sun has loads of US election coverage and even has a clock that's counting down..as well as a poll of Joe Plumbers about who they would vote for...




thwww.thesun.co.uk...



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 08:15 AM
link   

Originally posted by candyfloss

Originally posted by Dan.Dare
reply to post by detachedindividual
 


The one thing that never changes, no matter which party is in power, is US foreign policy. My idealistic side would believe that Obama can change it, my realist side thinks that mainstream political parties don't pick candidates who are going to rock the boat.

John McCain and Sarah Palin represent more of the same Bushist politics. He is far too old and she comes across like a character from Desperate Housewives. The lights are on but nobody is home. On the other hand Barack Obama's campaign is equally vacuous with his empty slogans about "Change" - changing what exactly? It's heart-warming rhetoric isn't it?

On a lighter note, can I ask all Americans to bombard their media with requests for 24/7 coverage of the next British general election. I really must insist, that you, as a matter of reciprocal courtesy and in accordance with the 'special relationship', subject yourselves to night after night of tedious analysis of the minutae of our political campaigns. If you haven't watched a British party political broadcast, you haven't lived



[edit on 31-10-2008 by Dan.Dare]
I like it!At least the Monster Raving Looney Party would make it watchable otherwise I think they'd be bored to death.One advantage of being a capitalist country I suppose lots of flags and expensive razamatazz.Interesting sentiments Dan.I think most peoples idealist side is at work during elections .I suppose it's because hope springs eternal.No wonder so many people are cynical about politics-is this the price we pay for democracy?


It is hard not to be cynical in this day and age. But I like your view that politics is the price we pay for democracy!



new topics

top topics



 
1
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join