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Sen. Ted Stevens found guilty in corruption case

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posted on Oct, 27 2008 @ 03:31 PM
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Sen. Ted Stevens found guilty in corruption case


news.yahoo.com

WASHINGTON – Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens was convicted of seven corruption charges Monday in a trial that tainted the 40-year Senate career of Alaska's political patriarch. The verdict, coming barely a week before Election Day, added further uncertainty to a closely watched Senate race. Democrats hope to seize the once reliably Republican seat as part of their bid for a filibuster-proof majority in the Senate.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Oct, 27 2008 @ 03:31 PM
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I'm surprised he was actually nailed on this one. Now comes an even bigger question: will he even do jail time? He could face 35 years, but almost certainly won't be sentenced that stiffly, nor really should he. Yes, he broke the law, but aside from murders, rapes, drug running/production, and blatent robberies, I really can't see the point in sending a man to prison for what would almost certainly be the remainder of his life.

news.yahoo.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Oct, 27 2008 @ 03:33 PM
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Originally posted by burdman30ott6


I'm surprised he was actually nailed on this one. Now comes an even bigger question: will he even do jail time? He could face 35 years, but almost certainly won't be sentenced that stiffly, nor really should he. Yes, he broke the law, but aside from murders, rapes, drug running/production, and blatent robberies, I really can't see the point in sending a man to prison for what would almost certainly be the remainder of his life.

news.yahoo.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


Why not?

The "little man" certainly would be sentanced to jail time, why shouldn't the same law be applied to politicians?

Isnt' that the #1 problem that we complain about? There is no recourse for those with money and power?

It would set an important example for many people in power to show that they can, and do, have to face consequences for the things they do during their tenure.



posted on Oct, 27 2008 @ 03:33 PM
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Despite being a convicted felon, he is not required to drop out of the race or resign from the Senate. If he wins re-election, he can continue to hold his seat because there is no rule barring felons from serving in Congress. The Senate could vote to expel him on a two-thirds vote.


I do love this part of the article. Of course there is no rule about this, as basically the whole lot of them are simply unconvicted fellons who have stolen from the American people at every turn. It would be interesting, however, to see how he could serve on the senate from behind bars.



posted on Oct, 27 2008 @ 03:35 PM
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Why do i get the feeling that just because he is from Alaska this will somehow be used to make Palin look negative in another way.

Im not surprised. Alaska is more personal when dealing with political affairs. A lot of the rigid ways of doing things in Washington are often laxed due to the apparent isolation.

I doubt he will see much prison time if any.



posted on Oct, 27 2008 @ 03:35 PM
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So a convicted felon can't vote, but he can still run for office?

What backwards country we are...



posted on Oct, 27 2008 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 


Actually, "the little guy" could never find themselves in this position at all, so we can't directly say that they would do jail time. By definition, in order for one to be guilty of corruption they really can't just be an average Joe, but have to sit in some position of authority. And for the record, I am not opposed to him recieving jail time, but I do think it would be ridiculous to send him up for 5 years for each conviction.



posted on Oct, 27 2008 @ 03:38 PM
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reply to post by asmeone2
 


I believe the federal government has left that as a state issue as to whether fellons can vote, not a federal issue. Although it would be interesting to see what would happen if a state attempted to place restrictions on who was eligible to run as a representative of their state in DC. I'm guessing some very prominent politicos would come unglued.



posted on Oct, 27 2008 @ 03:39 PM
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reply to post by burdman30ott6
 


What I meant was that the "little guy," when he falls afoul of the law, (legitimately or not) is often not extended the same kind of leniance. Insert whatever war-on-drugs or cheap prison labor conspiracy you want to, I just think it's rediculous to say that the law shoudl go easy on him when they hardly ever to do the average citizen.



posted on Oct, 27 2008 @ 03:39 PM
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I think there should be law that if your a politician you automatically get the max sentence.. to discourage corruption... But Bush will probably pardon him anyhow..



posted on Oct, 27 2008 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by burdman30ott6
 


It's a requirement in almost every state. Enough to be considered almost a given.



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