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How to make your own Ghillie suit

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posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 12:57 PM
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It’s a common question for many to wonder if you should try to make your own ghillie suit. In some survival situations, you may find you don’t have the option of buying a suit from the store so knowing how to make your own is certainly a good skill to have. Making your own homemade ghillie suit is not as easy as it may sound however, but if done correctly it will give you an advantage.

If you are making a ghillie suit from scratch, you will need materials from the environment to put together to create the camouflage and you will also need something to attach them to such as your own clothing or jacket, backpack and other materials. With nothing to hold the sticks and leaves on together, you will not be able to take cover below a ghillie suit. If you have any type of netting material on you, this can also be used to attach camouflage to and wrap around you as a suit.


Read more here

I've always been curious about these suits. I am reading through this now and thought I would pass the link along to share.




posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 01:10 PM
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ghillie suits are pretty neat, especially if made properly, you can blend in and be invisible to even animals. One downside is having to wear one in hot climates, HOT



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 01:45 PM
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Yeah I could see it as being hot but if circumstances warrant I would have no problem with the heat.


Does anyone have any advice on homemade winter ghillie suits?



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 01:51 PM
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what is a ghillie suit

picture

i didn't know what a ghillie suit was, so here is some info for anyone else like me on this thread!



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 05:39 PM
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Has anyone tried taking a picture of the plants in a wilderness in their area and matching them to similar coloured clothes/rag strips?

Screw invisibility devices... You got a modded ghillie suit



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 05:54 PM
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winter time use white linen. Dont cut strips, drape it across your gear and yourself to create a smoother less human outline. All white is not ideal though - even in winter there are other colours unless in deep artic in mid winter.



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by D4rk Kn1ght
 


Ok. I got a picture in my head with this in mind. Thanks.



indigothefish

The link I gave initially had photos of ghillies suits. If you click on the underlined word ghillie at the link, it takes you to photos. I think it was a store but hey, I was only interested at looking at the images.



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 06:05 PM
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What about an urban version? how could you camouflage yourself using the same technique to blend into, say, a run-down wartorn town with the same effectiveness?



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 06:10 PM
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reply to post by citizen smith
 


Good point. I would think by using colors similar to your surroundings. Either that or stick to black and move at night and in the shadows if you have to move around?



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 06:17 PM
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reply to post by citizen smith
 


Inner city use dark grey, dark blue and a lighter shade as base colour.
www.defensereview.com...

urban camo

Don't use black gear though, it sticks out like a sore thumb, and camouflage your weapon too.

[edit on 25-10-2008 by D4rk Kn1ght]



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 06:23 PM
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Originally posted by BindareDundat
reply to post by citizen smith
 


Good point. I would think by using colors similar to your surroundings. Either that or stick to black and move at night and in the shadows if you have to move around?



Blacks the worst colour to wear at night. Its too visible believe it or not. Darke grey however, now thats going to blend right in. Its all to do with the eye and how you 'see' at night using a different part of the eyes anatomy.

Black is a no go, even for night.



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by D4rk Kn1ght
 


Good to know about the color black. Thanks!



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 06:25 PM
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reply to post by citizen smith
 



Using the same ideas - lessen the 'human' outline, disrupt your outline and that of your gear, and look at the city. Is it alot of parks and green areas? or is it inner city? greys, dark greys and shape break up is your best bet and have a green/brown disruptive 'throw over' for those times your in the trees or bushes.



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by D4rk Kn1ght
 


i was thinking along the idea of using discarded packaging, takeaway trash, etc, and just as you would roll around in mud and horsepoo to match the scent of your wilderness surroundings, so too with the urban.



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 08:06 PM
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urban ghillie

Heres a grey and tan urban ghillie suited pair of snipers. works wonders and is alot better than piling up junk on yourself.



posted on Oct, 26 2008 @ 09:08 AM
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One other point is to NOT have a form of a human, the trick is to look in place, not out of place. If you have the correct technique, you could literally be wearing hunter orange and be un-noticed, or you could have bad technique wearing the top of the line camo and stick out like a sore thumb.



posted on Oct, 26 2008 @ 09:12 AM
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Originally posted by BindareDundat
Yeah I could see it as being hot but if circumstances warrant I would have no problem with the heat.


Does anyone have any advice on homemade winter ghillie suits?


The problem is can you go 12+ hours NOT moving under the hot sun in a desert environment? How are you going to hydrate? You just cant get up and say I quit and drink your ice tea........



posted on Oct, 26 2008 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by 38181
 




The problem is can you go 12+ hours NOT moving under the hot sun in a desert environment? How are you going to hydrate? You just cant get up and say I quit and drink your ice tea........



Good morning.


For one thing being in Canada I do not have to deal with a desert environment BUT I am an Australian and have spent many a year in the outback too where it can get so bloody scorching hot real quick before noon that nothing moves for many hours.

IF I were stuck in a desert situation I would seek shade from anything I could during the scorching day. Temperatures are cooler in the shade and if you dig down into the sand it is even more cooler. An idea would be to dig yourself a sort of trench so you can lay your body down in the cool sand. There are certain plants a person can use for hydration. Also a sap that you can chew on to help keep the juices going in your mouth. If you can't find water but do find moist mud, you can always put that in a piece of cloth and wring it downwards to the bottom of your cloth where you can then suck on the cloth to try to get any moisture drops. (One thing to remember is not to over exert yourself in the desert heat.) There are also critters a person can eat.

In the desert, night time temperatures can drop real fast. If you don't have warm gear, a person can pile rocks to make a cubby hole just big enough for you to sit back in. Rocks hold the heat and would keep you warm. It wouldn't be comfortable though


For now the only nasty condition I have to deal with is winter where it can drop to -47 or more with the wind chill and a person can suffer from frostbite in a few minutes.



posted on Oct, 26 2008 @ 02:21 PM
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In the desert you would simply unroll your hessian blind, snap your poles together and create a LUP. get it all covered over and nicely done and people can sit ten feet away and not see you. Do not however sleep inside it at night - every critter in the desert will be trying to join you for some warmth.



posted on Oct, 26 2008 @ 02:48 PM
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When I was a teenager, I constructed a ghillie suit with the assistance of a friend of mine who was a sniper in vietnam and was working as a recruiter in the reserves.

We started with basic green camo netting (the type used to camouflage vehicles and equipment in the field). He then advised me to shred uneven strips of tan and green burlap which frays easily helping to break up your pattern. These strips are tied randomly to the netting.






The construction of the suit was extremely cheap and I later used it during a few capture-the-flag paintball games. There were at least two incidents where opposing players stood within 3 feet of me without realizing that I was in front of them laying against some brush. The suits are very effective and fun to make.

I hope this helps people get an idea how to begin construction on a ghillie suit.

have fun!



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