Native Americans, Celts and Ancient Transatlantic Travel

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posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 01:04 AM
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Gaelic and Bengali are related.

The people of Bengal and the Gaelic nations have been found to be genetically related.

Personally, I think that Ogam and written Bengali look similar. Ogam looks like Bengali, simplified to be written on sticks. (though it is more likely the opposite.)

During the 1800s, there are stories of Gaelic military personnel being posted in the Bengal region for the Empire, and their accents while speaking English being so thick that the locals who had learned English to do their jobs couldn't understand them. The locals heard them speaking in Gaelic, and asked them stop speaking English to them and instead speak to them in Gaelic - because they could understand them better.

Bengali is known to have much Sanskrit influence.




posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 02:38 AM
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Scotland is another Gaelic speaking country that the Vikings later on conquered and settled in. In 830 A.D., there was an increase in the number of Viking attacks in Scotland. Nine years later, the Vikings moved on to the central and northern part of Scotland. These places were also considered to be a part of the Viking colony:

The scottish were also known as a seafairing people and would have picked up on the viking going to the new world.
www.telegraph.co.uk...
They may have even fallowed or went with the vikings.
www.family-ancestry.co.uk...

The Norse eventually lost their hold in Scotland. But Celts and the Vikings must ultimately have started to get along. DNA evidence suggests many Scots and Icelanders interbred and settled in both countries.



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 07:17 AM
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Originally posted by Aeons
Gaelic and Bengali are related.

The people of Bengal and the Gaelic nations have been found to be genetically related.

Personally, I think that Ogam and written Bengali look similar. Ogam looks like Bengali, simplified to be written on sticks. (though it is more likely the opposite.)

During the 1800s, there are stories of Gaelic military personnel being posted in the Bengal region for the Empire, and their accents while speaking English being so thick that the locals who had learned English to do their jobs couldn't understand them. The locals heard them speaking in Gaelic, and asked them stop speaking English to them and instead speak to them in Gaelic - because they could understand them better.

Bengali is known to have much Sanskrit influence.



Thanks, you connected more dots for me
. I can nurse my hangover now



posted on Feb, 27 2011 @ 07:24 AM
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Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck

Originally posted by Versa
I will try to connect more dots tomorrow when I am less inebriated

So even in Magrathea, it's Saturday night.


Ever since Zaphod introduced the pangalatic gargle blaster. You'll find a lot more countries made with crinkly edges these days.

OT looks like my vague thought regarding Celts and Sanskrit has been more or less cleared up



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:00 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 

Anishinaabe

I am E. I am a member of the Great Anishinaabe Nation. We have many different dialects of this Anishinaabe language and a Proto-language which obviously means an old form.
Being part of both the Odaawaa and Ojibwe people's amongst the Anishinaabe nation both languages are simular so that we can communicate, but there are others where we can pick a part scentences and words and use what we understand, just as Spanish to Italian to French.
Seeing that we as a whole are losing our language and being that there are countless inititive programs to re-enstate our languages status we look in a more scientific way of our very complex language. We are in a science age. We look at our mtDNA and see that there are lines of maternal liniage within the basque geographic locations as to our geographic location, but we are limited, and seeing that the studies conducted by scientists on the Basque and their genetic make-up would explain our very Paelio-lithic (lack of a better word) features and oddities in our very extreme language we could very well be realted in the manner of life and migrations. But, I do not accept the some of the theories and why should I, we all have differences, such as one theory that Gaelic is our mother tongue when we have our mother tongue which has not been heard on a daily basis, but has been shared through out a life time and in our Ojibwe language we hear those sounds, and see those old pictures the way our anscestors have.

I have read something on here about the Mi'maqs and they consider themselves Lnu'k in our language part of that word is part of our acsestrial way of saying man or human in the Proto-Algonquian way, many of our people either say Anishinaabeg or Ininiwag, although seeing that languages evolve the way the old Algonquian people said human was either Anishinaabe or ILINIWAG both mean (people or mankind).
There are though very interesting linguistical simularities in Basque and Anishinaabemowin that are not to be over lookes specially when we pluralize our words, though we don't have gender we pluralize whether something is living or non-living examples: door= ishkwaandem -oon (ishkwaandemoon or ishkwaandeman) tree= mitig -oog (mitigoog and a place mitigookaang "the forest") and with that there are actions noted as VTA, VTI that mean different upon what one is speaking of, these are verbs. @Earl Otchingwanigan language instructor and old time indian. example: Onandawaabandaan iw adoopowin = He/she searches (by looking for something) that chair. Or, Onandawaabamaa a'aw jejiibajikii. = He/she searches (by looking for someone) that mammoth.

edit on Tue Feb 19 2013 by DontTreadOnMe because: paragraphs!!



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:08 PM
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continuation of above post
 


Our language I would have to say is very very complex in way that the Basque probably lost connection of and our language Ojibwewanishinaabemowin is changed from that Proto-algonquian way but still the complexities I am sure are still very highly complex. In our oral history it is said that we came from a land (the Anishinaabeg) from the east, this is the part that I find very confusing to many, we are supposed to be originate here in America, but still we lived here when there where the great awesiinh ( animals) of the land.

We had an adizookaan wich was used to tell of our history by deaming a name to a person and telling of great tales, but in a Socio-cultural anthropogical view we use such tales as symbols of a people and not a person.

How long have we lives this earth and how long have we been separate would be the biggest question to think about. If I would have to make a theory I would say that evolution takes tole on all life and that there can be many different stages of evolution and many species and somehow we come out with the genetics that we share today.

I would also include that Neandrathols could very well be ancestors of the Basque and the Anishinaabeg as stated in many scientific theories, but also include that we do not know humanity or life at all and we need not disclose crazy theories such as Atlantians being these groups. Because theroies made are usually theories that have been thought. Who knows, science will hopefully one day prove all spectrums, but then where will be the fantasy?
edit on Tue Feb 19 2013 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)





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