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Any Freelance Writers On ATS???

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posted on Oct, 22 2008 @ 11:23 PM
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I have recently been thinking of becoming a freelance writer. I like to write, and always was one of the best at my schools. I would like to get advice from others who freelance. As a beginning freelance writer, how much did you charge for small projects? How much did you charge for large projects?

I have been publishing posts on craigslist offering my writing services, and charging $10 a page. Is that sufficient enough for a beginner such as myself?

[edit on 22-10-2008 by AlexG141989]




posted on Oct, 23 2008 @ 12:29 AM
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There's sites you can sell your stuff. I just got into it myself... Good money to be made if you write enough.

Wish I could be more help, but.. I do something else fulltime, so just write when compelled and sell it. I could tell where on u2u if you wanna know.



posted on Oct, 23 2008 @ 01:02 AM
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I read a book about freelancing and I LOVE the idea of it. I'm going to try to do some freelance writing after I get out of college. Do any of you have advice on how to prepare for that?



posted on Oct, 23 2008 @ 01:44 AM
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Well, the opportunities are endless these days for freelance writers on the internet! I can think of a couple webmaster forums where people will commission you to write their content for their website. Most webmasters really don't like writing, so will pay others to do it for them


To anyone with good writing abilities, it's easy to make a living, if you know how.

I don't have any advice really, I just know this is one thing that there is a lot of demand for.

This is one thing that works for me.... Even when the economy is bad, you don't have to depend on the survival of some company to make a living, when you work for yourself and have abilities others want to take advantage of.



posted on Oct, 23 2008 @ 01:58 AM
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If you want to pursue freelance writing then I would highly recommend that watch the movie Factotum. It's based on the work of Charles Bukowski, it may give you a taste of what you're in for if you want to really be a writer.



posted on Oct, 23 2008 @ 03:06 AM
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Currently I got a steady gig over at a football site being an analyst. I would like to say i can break down a game better on my craptacular 19 inch tv than the talking heads who sit in a studio with 30 plasma TVs or the ones at the game
. Either way I simply sent a copy of relevant sample writings to the site host and he hired me.



posted on Oct, 23 2008 @ 11:35 AM
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Thanks for the responses


I could tell where on u2u if you wanna know.


Sure, I would like to know


If you want to pursue freelance writing then I would highly recommend that watch the movie Factotum. It's based on the work of Charles Bukowski, it may give you a taste of what you're in for if you want to really be a writer.


Thanks, I'm gonna look that up



posted on Oct, 23 2008 @ 02:16 PM
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reply to post by AlexG141989
 


It depends entirely on who you are writing for. I have free lanced for print media, not web, so I don't know how the web charges. Usually for print such as magazines, it's a per word charge, like $.05 a word. Note that "word" is going to be defined by your publisher. It's not necessarily defined the way a word processor counts words.

If you write something long, like a novel, you'll need to make contacts in the publishing industry such as writing conferences to get an editor to consider your work. Once that happens, you might get the attention of an agent, which will make connecting to publishers a lot easier. You can always send a script to the slush pile of a publisher, but that's a complete crap shoot, and a losing one in my experience.

Some general advice:

1. Write a lot, and be prepared to be rejected a lot. You know you're improving when you actually get rejected scripts back and they have comments on them from an editor.

2. Be ready to write on "spec." This means be ready to write on speculation, which is the whim of whatever publisher you're after. With certain publishers like news oriented ones, content will shift greatly one month to another. With others, like science magazines, there is usually a schedule planned out a year ahead regarding what kind of content will get published.

3. It doesn't hurt having an objective expertise in some area. If you're writing a science article and have a graduate degree in that area, that will go far with a publisher.

4. Be in tune with what publishers want. I worked for a tech publication for a while, and was amazed people sent us fluff pieces about their cats. Um, sorry, but we published articles on computing.

Let me know if there's any other advice or tips I can give you.



posted on Oct, 23 2008 @ 02:24 PM
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I do freelance writing (political) but some of my work has been hosted on top political sites in the United Kingdom - platforms which MPs contribute to.

I mainly write for geo-political freelance online magazine.

Want any advice, just U2U me.



posted on Oct, 23 2008 @ 04:22 PM
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Loads of great advice here! I will give away the sources I use, for anyone else interested in the u2u. Just not gunna broadcast them over a whole open forum.



posted on Oct, 23 2008 @ 10:14 PM
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Does anyone have any websites I could write articles for? I don't want to write for the bigger ones if I won't get paid.



posted on Oct, 26 2008 @ 02:57 PM
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I just got paid for my first job...


I edited a college student's Diversity Statement



posted on Oct, 26 2008 @ 03:29 PM
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Originally posted by AlexG141989
I just got paid for my first job...


I edited a college student's Diversity Statement


Way to go on landing your first gig!


I've been a writer for over 15 years.

I quit my day job four years ago after finally earning enough money to go full time as a freelancer and I've never looked back. These days I have my own business as a writer, editor, website publisher, website manager and consultant.

If I could give you any advice, it would be:

1. Never sell yourself short - set your prices and stick to them.

2. Network with other freelancers to learn everything you can about the business.

3. Avoid scams - they're everywhere.

4. Remember your reputation is at stake, so where you write determines who you are at the time.

5. Write what you know - you can only fake it for so long.

I currently write for a lot of online websites and I'm the editor of a few as well, so I hire freelancers from time to time. Through my writing, I've met and interviewed celebrities, been interviewed myself for books, articles and on NPR and I've written for online, print and other forms of media.

I wish you great success. Feel free to U2U me anytime.



posted on Oct, 28 2008 @ 12:13 PM
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Yes, I am. Newspaper reporter for a decade, now doing freelance work on the side.

What can I do for you?



posted on Oct, 28 2008 @ 12:34 PM
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As one pointed out, scams are everywhere, but there are a couple of reliable sites to get notified on both jobs and freelancing gigs:

www.journalismjobs.com

www.mediabistro.com

www.freelancewriting.com

www.associatedcontent.com (an online blog that pays you in Paypal -- and pays well under typical market rates. But if you can crap out a story in a couple of hours or so, helps you earn some extra bucks you can spend on your World of Warcraft account or something).

The latest version of the Writer's Market is also pretty critical.

If you want copywriting/marketing/PR writing assignments, then your local Public Relations Society of America chapter website has job listings as well.

Remember, you're only as good as your last story. Contrary to what someone pointed out earlier -- write what you know -- that is unrecommended for the newbie. As a journalist, you're expected to delve into any subject. Eventually you'll want to specialize in a topic -- for instance, if you like science writing, start there and eventually you can specialize on global warming or ocean topics or chemistry or some other variant.

Also, buy a copy of the AP style guide. It's indespensible and necessary.

Other points:



  1. Newspapers want article in past tense, magazines in present tense.
  2. Decide now if you want to be a journalist or a marketer. Even today, many legitimate publications won't allow their freelancers to swing both ways.
  3. Don't expect editors to assign you stories, go out and dig them up yourself.
  4. Remember to always stick with granting publications First North American Serial Rights. This gives a publication the one time right to publish your work and not perpetually -- and that way you're able to repackage stories and try to sell them to other magazines.
  5. If you have submitted a story for consideration to more than one publication, please let the editors know in your query letter. Nothing pisses a magazine off than seeing their story in a competitor's publication with your name attached.
  6. Be very aware of your tone -- good articles only inflect the opinion of those being interviewed. Too many "citizen journalists" and bloggers mesh facts with op/ed. You can do that all day long online, but you won't get paid for it.
  7. With newspapers cutting staff, it's become a very good time to be a freelancer. Especially community papers (not major dailies), which will be hungry for content but cannot afford to assign a staffer.
  8. Trade publications tend to pay better than newspapers and even some consumer magazines. But be prepared to offer a lot more "inside baseball" and expertise on the subject if you go that route.
  9. Contrary to popular belief, a bottle of scotch in your desk drawer and a fedora on your head are still required for journalists.



posted on Oct, 28 2008 @ 12:59 PM
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posted on Oct, 28 2008 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by behindthescenes
 


Is it alright if I wear a bowler instead of the fedora?

Great thread OP. Thank you and to all the people volunteering their assistance to those of us seeking...
Cheers
-v



posted on Oct, 29 2008 @ 10:51 PM
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Way to go on landing your first gig!

I've been a writer for over 15 years.

I quit my day job four years ago after finally earning enough money to go full time as a freelancer and I've never looked back. These days I have my own business as a writer, editor, website publisher, website manager and consultant.

If I could give you any advice, it would be:

1. Never sell yourself short - set your prices and stick to them.

2. Network with other freelancers to learn everything you can about the business.

3. Avoid scams - they're everywhere.

4. Remember your reputation is at stake, so where you write determines who you are at the time.

5. Write what you know - you can only fake it for so long.

I currently write for a lot of online websites and I'm the editor of a few as well, so I hire freelancers from time to time. Through my writing, I've met and interviewed celebrities, been interviewed myself for books, articles and on NPR and I've written for online, print and other forms of media.

I wish you great success. Feel free to U2U me anytime.


Thanks for all of the advice. So far I landed a job writing articles for this Sculpture Art website. I begin that tomorrow. It doesn't pay much, so I've also got other small jobs on the side.

And thanks for the advice behindthescens...



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 04:54 AM
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Being an expert in English, music, and education--but being too far in-debt to sink another 5-figures getting a teaching license--I bought a laptop and drawing/movie software for $600. My storyboards said I needed 200 paintings and 13 short songs, and within 7 months I had my first film (see sig)!
Now I can market the film from home, provide specialized advice to teachers, and have time to tour with a band.
(Oh yeah, I also wrote several online stories and articles, some for as low as a $15 paycheck, and received $0 for my efforts. Life is just too short for that bs.
)



[edit on 31-10-2008 by tocs100]



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 08:21 PM
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If you're into screenwriting, but can't afford the overpriced software, there's a couple of excellent programs that are free.

The best is www.celtx.com



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