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India's Chandrayaan Blasts Off To The Moon!

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posted on Nov, 20 2008 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Phage.....I think you have your finger on the pulse of the problem....

If I may....there is an entire Generation of 'folk' who are used to a 'Science Fiction' perception of Space.

I can say this, as an informed 'fan' of Science Fiction....

Allow me to say, and please heed this....for all Science Fiction fans out there, and you know who you are, we can all collectively 'cringe' whenever a space craft 'explodes', and we hear the 'sound' of THAT explosion.

THIS is the dis-connect!!!!!

Popular entertainment, and its lack of believability, and real-world space, and its boringness....




posted on Nov, 20 2008 @ 02:36 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


I am not quite sure I get what you are saying, all your punctuation marks sometimes get in the way of your message for me.


I know that your post was a reply to Phage, but I still want to say that regarding science fiction, I have never been into that at all. I read a lot of books, but I have never ever read a sci-fi book. Some sci-fi films have been OK to watch, but they are not my favorites. They simply do not interest me that much.

When it comes to space related matters, I prefer the truth.
It is not science fiction that got me interested in what is up there on the moon. So you see, not all of us lunatics are sci-fi fans.



posted on Nov, 20 2008 @ 02:42 PM
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I wish to expand on my last POST:

As a former Airline Pilot I think I can bring some complexity into this discussion.

I have had the occasion to bring loved ones into my Simulator sessions....I was naive to think that seeing me, at 'work', would somehow bring us closer together.

(Since it was impossible to allow non-airline personnel in the actual cockpit, the 'Simulator' was the closest we could use...)

What I found was....anyone OUT of the field I was in, became almost instantly bored with what I found personally interesting.

Here's the dilemma: IF you are the one under the 'gun', so to speak (as in a Simulator) then you have one focus...IF you are the Instructor, then you have a different 'focus'....(I.e., complete the lesson-plan)

IF you are just an observor who has NO IDEA what you're obverving....then you just become bored with the procedures, because you don't really care about what's going on, because it's not your area of expertise.

And THAT is what I learned.....

Which is WHY people get bored watching REAL space exploration happening, right in front of their eyes.....because they just cannot understand, nor can they comprehend, the complexities involved.



posted on Nov, 20 2008 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by ziggystar60
 


ziggy, I was about to sign off....

I just read your response....and I wojld recommend some Science Fiction for YOU to read....if I may, I would suggest Issac Asimov, to start...

Please consider his "I. Robot" series....but, please begin at the 'beginning'...and don't jump ahead.

I have one alternate...if you don't like Asimov....pick up a paperback copy of "Dune"....and read it, then come back and tell us you weren't hooked...(And please don't cheat, and rent the movie....much more nuance, in the book...)



posted on Nov, 20 2008 @ 09:23 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
sentinal....huh??
"orbit-inerary" ????
...

Never mind!! Frequently I get the itch to play with words -- that was actually Orbit + Itinerary combined into one.



posted on Nov, 20 2008 @ 09:35 PM
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Originally posted by ziggystar60
... but I still want to say that regarding science fiction, I have never been into that at all. I read a lot of books, but I have never ever read a sci-fi book. Some sci-fi films have been OK to watch, but they are not my favorites. They simply do not interest me that much.

When it comes to space related matters, I prefer the truth.
It is not science fiction that got me interested in what is up there on the moon. So you see, not all of us lunatics are sci-fi fans.


Tell you what, since you are in ATS and, therefore, open-minded, read Arthur C Clarke's short story "Sentinel" (no, there is no bias here in that suggestion
), and follow up with the "Space Odyssey" series. Clarke probably knew a lot many "behind-the-scenes" things which the normal scientific community doesn't (or doesn't want to??) know about. If my information is correct, he was a Freemason too!


MikeS / Zor, care to confirm/deny what I just wrote about Clarke, plus the monolith thing in "Sentinel" and its correlation with an actual magnetic anomaly in the mentioned region of the moon?


[edit on 20/11/2008 by sentinel2107]



posted on Nov, 20 2008 @ 09:37 PM
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reply to post by ziggystar60
 


yes please do share those pictures that give us more detail of the areas as compared to what we have seen being mapped by these orbiters across the spectrum..
Eye candy pictures have a very limited scientific value as compared to those taken beyond the visible range. And I'm sure some blue/green/yellow modern art-esque data feeds would most certainly interest a very little % of the questioning people.
If you go to the Space Exploration Forum, or contact Internos (who has done bl00dy fine job of tracking SELENE data), you will find a lot of data collected on this probes.
If you have already, then I'm not sure what you need.



posted on Nov, 20 2008 @ 10:11 PM
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reply to post by sentinel2107
 


Unfortunately, TMA-1 does not seem to exist with our current magnetic mapping. But who knows what the new birds will show us.



posted on Nov, 21 2008 @ 12:36 AM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


Not at all, WW!!
It's just that this thread is about Chandrayaan and not about how the darn Moon came about!!
That's going to be on another thread I intend to open soon.

Now did I hear you say, "Oh crap! Not another crazy thread from Mike! Pllleeassse!! Why doesn't he go on a vacation?"



posted on Nov, 21 2008 @ 12:49 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
Unfortunately, TMA-1 does not seem to exist with our current magnetic mapping. But who knows what the new birds will show us.


Really? Missed that...
Where did it go?



Originally posted by sentinel2107
MikeS / Zor, care to confirm/deny what I just wrote about Clarke, plus the monolith thing in "Sentinel" and its correlation with an actual magnetic anomaly in the mentioned region of the moon?


Well I could give you some stuff about Clark and Sagan... but as Mike says... lets do that elsewhere
. And don't mind WW he's an English professor



posted on Nov, 21 2008 @ 01:05 AM
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Originally posted by sentinel2107
MikeS / Zor, care to confirm/deny what I just wrote about Clarke, plus the monolith thing in "Sentinel" and its correlation with an actual magnetic anomaly in the mentioned region of the moon?



I luv sci-fi!
Especially Clarke and Asimov! Read all they've dished out. Some of their stuff is absolutely fascinating.

But the top-of-the-rung sci-fi for me is:

Rendezvous With Rama - Arthur C Clarke.

Contact - Carl Sagan


These two novels are the most mind boggling stuff I've ever read! Whew!


As regards those magnetic anomalies on the Moon mentioned by Clarke in his novels, well that's another story. Are you aware that he was mixed up in the top secret CIA/Military/NRO Moon program? He knew a lot more about the Moon than we will ever know, some of which he has included in his books, inadvertently or by design.

Check out my signature below. We know damn all of what the heck's actually going on!

Cheers!



posted on Nov, 21 2008 @ 01:39 AM
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Originally posted by zorgon
Really? Missed that...
Where did it go?



Tycho area (43.3° S, 11.2° W) looks pretty bland. The backside seems to be where the action is.

Niven fan myself. Though Arthur, Isaac, and Robert set the standards.



[edit on 21-11-2008 by Phage]



posted on Nov, 21 2008 @ 01:41 AM
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reply to post by Daedalus3
 



I have sent you some links in a U2U.
Hope you enjoy the images. Or "eye candy" as you call them.




posted on Nov, 21 2008 @ 01:58 AM
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Originally posted by PhageThe backside seems to be where the action is.


So what happened to THIS one from Lunar Prospector?




This diagram shows the magnetic anomaly on the Moon which is powerful enough to "stand off" the solar wind. This is the smallest such magnetic shock front ever identified.

lunar.arc.nasa.gov...



posted on Nov, 21 2008 @ 02:02 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


That one seems to be at 30S, 170E.
Which would be on the backside, as I said.

TMA1 (Tycho Magnetic Anomaly, of Space Odessey fame was in Tycho). That was my point.

[edit on 21-11-2008 by Phage]



posted on Nov, 21 2008 @ 06:49 AM
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Originally posted by ziggystar60
reply to post by Daedalus3
 



I have sent you some links in a U2U.
Hope you enjoy the images. Or "eye candy" as you call them.




Why don't you post the links here, so that all of us can checkout the south pole?



posted on Nov, 21 2008 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by sentinel2107
 


Wes Higgins has some excellent images. Here is one of Moretus, the crater in the middle of the image, and the areas around ut. There are some fascinating geometrical structures NE of Moretus (the area above Moretus in the image):

higginsandsons.com...

More fantastic lunar and planetary Hi Res images at Wes Higgins website, listed by feature names:
higginsandsons.com...

This should keep you busy for some time.



posted on Nov, 21 2008 @ 05:26 PM
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Eyecandy from Lunar Orbiter 1965





For comparison of course




posted on Nov, 21 2008 @ 07:29 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Hey look! It's gray.




heh, nevermind



posted on Nov, 21 2008 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Pretty good pic!
But as phage has mentioned, it's all Grey! Damn!



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