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I just had midterm exams.

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posted on Oct, 21 2008 @ 04:35 PM
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Hi I just had college midterm exams in my American Government class and in an intro to theatre class.

I'm wondering what I should do in the future to ease my fear of how I am going to do on the tests. What should I do to study? How should I study? Are there websites that help you with how to study?

What advice do you have for me? I used to never do well on multiple choice and short answer tests (the kind of tests they give at my college) but I'm starting to do well on them now but I still don't have the confidence I need.




posted on Oct, 21 2008 @ 06:16 PM
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I just got out of college here's what I learned about test taking:

1. Don't be afraid, worried, nervous, frustrated, etc. EVER
HOW? Study, study, study and be confident you know it all. If you don't, pretend you do, be confident. Pretend you know everything even when you don't. (It's better to study AND be confident though)
WHY? If you are feeling any of these ways, you will not have good memory. You might get a mind block (like writers block).
Proof? When I would leave a test I was nervous about, I would relax more, and suddenly I can think of answers. So if you know it or not, nervousness and fear will only inhibit your test-taking abilities

2. To study, learn to read and re-read. Also make flash cards about everything, I knew tons of people that this works great with. You just flip through em as much as ya can. Also talk to professors, ask them "what's on this test?" or "What should I study?". You can even schedule out of class appts, they might help you even more there. (maybe a reference someday). Also study and compare notes with friends. This always helps and you can save $ splitting books together. I'm not sure of any specific sites, but I bet they exist, try google.

3. Multiple choice aren't bad, just learn to eliminate the BS ones first then your odds are better. Also don't answer things you don;t know right away, if unable to knock 2 out just move on immediately and come back to it. It's funny how often a full multiple choice test can answer itself in later questions or potential answers of them.

Short answer can be difficult becasue you have to know it, but at least most teachers make them very straitforward and not tricky.

4. Get the confidence!

(I hope that makes sense to you)



posted on Oct, 21 2008 @ 09:42 PM
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I think the most helpful thing people who experience a lot of stress about tests can do is not to cram for them.

Always do your reading before class so that the lecture or discussion is solidifying stuff you are already familiar with. If the textbooks have questions at the end of chapters, try to answer as many as possible, even if it's not required. Spend a little time every day studying for each class, and study in small chunks (30-45 minutes of studying with no TV, internet, phone, etc, then a break, then study ...).

Basically, focus on learning the material instead of on the testing part. Then you won't have to stress out so much on test day; you can just treat it like any other class day.

Two other things that I see a lot of people doing that are terrible for me: drilling each other right before the test, and comparing notes right after the test. Before a test I like to read through my notes on my own; after a test I try to let it go until I get the grade. I'm very sensitive to other people's emotions, and being in a crowd of panicky students is guaranteed to make me panic.

Hope that helps.



posted on Oct, 22 2008 @ 01:30 AM
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[QUOTE]
2. To study, learn to read and re-read. Also make flash cards about everything, I knew tons of people that this works great with. You just flip through em as much as ya can. Also talk to professors, ask them "what's on this test?" or "What should I study?". You can even schedule out of class appts, they might help you even more there. (maybe a reference someday). Also study and compare notes with friends. This always helps and you can save $ splitting books together. I'm not sure of any specific sites, but I bet they exist, try google.

3. Multiple choice aren't bad, just learn to eliminate the BS ones first then your odds are better. Also don't answer things you don;t know right away, if unable to knock 2 out just move on immediately and come back to it. It's funny how often a full multiple choice test can answer itself in later questions or potential answers of them.
Thanks for the advice. It’s funny, I took an intro to theatre exam today, and, while I was taking the test, on the ones I didn’t know the answer for, I just eliminated the ones that were wrong and that’s how I go the answer to quite a few of the questions. The POE technique (process of elimination) works in many situations. I like it.
I like your second suggestion too, it really helps to read, reread, and study. That’s a strategy that I used during these exams. I think that helps.
I appreciate your first suggestion, with not doubting yourself. I often doubted for the first college class I took the legitimacy of my good grades on tests because I felt like they were too easy. I can see that this isn’t a good mindset to have.
reply to post by americandingbat
 

I don’t think people should cram. Don’t you think it would be better to be constantly preparing for the exams during the duration of the class? As long as you know what to study—would this work—if I just studied the material that I am given in class every day—in preparation for the exam so I don’t forget stuff?



posted on Oct, 22 2008 @ 02:00 AM
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Originally posted by Frankidealist35
I appreciate your first suggestion, with not doubting yourself. I often doubted for the first college class I took the legitimacy of my good grades on tests because I felt like they were too easy. I can see that this isn’t a good mindset to have.


If it's any consolation, it's pretty typical. I'm something of a career student (graduated from undergrad in 1995, did a couple years of graduate school, then out in the real world for a while, then back to undergrad to study something different last year). I always doubt myself, and whether or not I'm deserving of good grades.

But you're right – it's not a productive mindset. I'm getting much better at trusting that I deserve what I get.


I don’t think people should cram. Don’t you think it would be better to be constantly preparing for the exams during the duration of the class? As long as you know what to study—would this work—if I just studied the material that I am given in class every day—in preparation for the exam so I don’t forget stuff?


Exactly, that's what I was trying to say. The more comfortable you are with the material throughout the term, the less you will panic at exam time. Keep in mind that professors do not design exams to try to trick you or find the one piece of information you've forgotten. They design exams to get an overall sense of how well the class has learned the material, and how well you have learned the material. A lot of students take the view that it's the professor against them – it's really not.

It's good to hear that you were able to use strategy on your most recent exam. It will get easier with time



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 04:03 PM
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reply to post by americandingbat
 



If it's any consolation, it's pretty typical. I'm something of a career student (graduated from undergrad in 1995, did a couple years of graduate school, then out in the real world for a while, then back to undergrad to study something different last year). I always doubt myself, and whether or not I'm deserving of good grades.

But you're right – it's not a productive mindset. I'm getting much better at trusting that I deserve what I get.

NO it's not and if you don't study enough then it shows that you aren't being positive. The way to counter this mindset is to do enough studying.



Exactly, that's what I was trying to say. The more comfortable you are with the material throughout the term, the less you will panic at exam time. Keep in mind that professors do not design exams to try to trick you or find the one piece of information you've forgotten. They design exams to get an overall sense of how well the class has learned the material, and how well you have learned the material. A lot of students take the view that it's the professor against them – it's really not.

It's good to hear that you were able to use strategy on your most recent exam. It will get easier with time

I hope I did well on it. I'm going to be trying this new technique I have on studying for the rest of school... I'm going to try to study for at least 30 minutes a day... so I won't forget what I already know.

Would you say that's a good idea? What do you think about it?



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by Frankidealist35
 


Totally off post, are you interested in theater or was this a requirement?

ColoradoJens



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 05:44 PM
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reply to post by ColoradoJens
 


Both! I'm interested in theatre and it's a requirement.

However, my major is going to be political science.



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by Frankidealist35
 


Ha! Politics and theater go hand in hand! That's cool - my wife went to the Academy of Dramatic Arts in NY and we made a couple of plays off broadway - I am a director and writer - theater is one of the most immediate and true expresions of art when done right. Cool - good luck! - And regarding studying, do what ever it takes.

These emoticons are kinda hmmm silly?



posted on Oct, 25 2008 @ 08:44 PM
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reply to post by Frankidealist35
 


I think setting aside a half hour a day to study sounds great. Another thing to think about is what time of day is best for you – what time you're thinking most clearly.

I'm a total night owl, so trying to study in the morning is useless. I do okay in the afternoon, but better after 10 p.m. A lot of people I know prefer to get up earlier in the morning to devote some time to studying, because their minds are clearest at the beginning of the day.

Also, you can experiment with whether it's best for you to go over material covered in class later that same day, or a day or two later. Most professors I've had have recommended reading through your lecture notes the same day that you have the lecture, but it actually works better for me if I wait a day or two before I go over them.

Good luck with the new study plan



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