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'Atlas of death' author reveals why so many Glaswegians die young

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posted on Oct, 19 2008 @ 08:32 PM
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'Atlas of death' author reveals why so many Glaswegians die young


www.theherald.co.u k

Living in an affluent area could prolong your life by up to 14 years, according to research published yesterday.

An "atlas of death", charting geographical patterns of mortality rates around the UK, found the average age of death varied between 66 years in the Easterhouse area of Glasgow and 80 in Eastbourne, Sussex.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Oct, 19 2008 @ 08:32 PM
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This has got to be the silliest study I have ever seen. What are they trying to tell people with this?
It is common sense to me that people from a 'better off' area would have better health and subsequently live longer. They have access to heath facilities, they can afford better medical cover and there is less crime drugs and other social negatives that would adversly effect your health.
This suggests that if you move to a 'better' neighbourhood your life expectancy would improve? If the people from a poor location could move they would wouldn't they?
Instead, why don't those in power spend this research money and try and improve conditions for the less fortunate instead of stating the clearly obvious?

www.theherald.co.u k
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Oct, 19 2008 @ 08:40 PM
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reply to post by VIKINGANT
 


Good post - I think that they are "stating the obvious", as they have over and over and over because they cannot state the even more obvious - it is much easier to establish industry that pollutes in poor neighborhoods than wealthy ones. In relation, because of the heavy concentration of these industries, there are rises in asthma and repiratory issues, even certain cancers that actually would outpace the "healthy wealthy set", regardless of better facilities or doctors.

I am in synch with your disappointment at another study.

ColoradoJens



posted on Oct, 19 2008 @ 09:43 PM
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reply to post by ColoradoJens
 

You know something. I was concentrating on the aspect of the peoples lifestyles, but you are absolutely correct about the industry. Most of the factories are located near the working class (or is it the other way around) which is why those that live in the country tend to be healthier. It is not just the factories being in the area, but those who live nearby and work in them that would suffer the most. As I said before. If you could afford to move away you probably have a cleaner job and are healthier alreaady.



posted on Oct, 19 2008 @ 11:19 PM
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I think we need a study on this.

No, really, a good study would tell us if this report is accurate!


/sarcasm

[edit on 19-10-2008 by 2stepsfromtop]



posted on Oct, 20 2008 @ 12:17 PM
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Reply to VikingAnt - what in the world is up with the reply button?

I was thinking about this last night and wanted to post again:
I can't agree more with you regarding the waste of money and time on the obvious. However, you need some corallary's to create the dialogue. Once established as fact, then the idea is to look further, beyond the obviousness of the "perhipheral" reasons ie: worse health ins, hospitals, diet, etc. imo. This is not good ATS decorum, but I read a book a while back that I can't remember the name of (I will) - but the premise went along the lines that the problem is cyclical in nature in that;

1) Poor neighborhoods have all (mentioned) inherited problems related to health.
2) Industry chooses (primarily when in urban enviroments) to locate in these areas, lowering health more, and decreasing property taxes.
3) Due to decreased property taxes, public schooling in these areas receive LESS than those say, across the river.
4) With public schools run by the students, education is terrible. The low paying factory jobs are tthe best option. One never leaves, and all health problems are compounded.

Just some thoughts.

In the US, this is typical in many poor African-American communities, East St. Louis being one of the most egregious.

ColoradoJens

[edit on 20-10-2008 by ColoradoJens]



posted on Oct, 21 2008 @ 10:30 AM
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Reply to VIKINGANT

I found the book I was referring to in my last post:

Savage Inequalities by Jonathan Kozol: It is really more an exploration of the education system in the US (poor neighborhoods) but the book also explores the health related issues too. I think again it is like so many other things we explore; once one stone is unturned, then there is another and another and another. Thanks again for the post.

ColoradoJens



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