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The "up-to-the-minute Market Data" thread

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posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 03:57 PM
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We have not had any 5% up days in the Asian markets in a while. After the recent selloff there must be a ton of money on the sidelines waiting to be reinvested. When you have heavy demand those price ramping programs can do amazing things.

offer 1 share @X, 1@X+1, 1@X+2 etc.

Nikkei opened up 250 points that's a bullish sign.

Up 321 points 3.14 % at 9 PM EST

www.nikkei.co.jp...


[edit on 23-8-2009 by fromunclexcommunicate]

[edit on 23-8-2009 by fromunclexcommunicate]




posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 07:28 PM
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reply to post by fromunclexcommunicate
 
I think we're maybe possibly on the leading edge of a cusp of a possible future recovery. The prospects look encouraging and we're guessing a massive possible recovery could occur at any second in the near future...or just a little further out...our outlook remains blessedly optimistic considering all the money sitting on the sidelines just waiting to chase this dragster on the strip...


Nikkei 225 10,467.52 8:07PM ET Up 229.32 (2.24%)
Seoul Composite 1,604.34 8:08PM ET Up 23.36 (1.48%)


~Sukiyaki Seppuku!!!~




[edit on 8/23/2009 by Hx3_1963]



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by GreenBicMan
 


That's all fine and good if you believe in TA over fundamentals. I think that seems to be the difference in our views of the future direction of the markets. Do you really think the trading desks at GS and JPM and the like can create a sustained bull market?



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by THX-1138
 


It's an inverse etf, my cash position is irrelevant. I have lubed the proper orifices if you TA junkies decide to take me for a ride in the coming weeks.



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 07:56 PM
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How does one predict the future?

It depends on the time the question is asked and on the nature of the question. There are answers regarding future developments that cannot be answered due to the degree of entropy in the system that shapes the future. (Fancy words out -- make it scholarly, so no one knows what the heck is going on. And you will look sooooo fu*ing smart.)

Entropy is that darn thing that stays between you and a lotto jackpot.

What does the future hold: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 . . . ?

There are certain developments called "trends." These processes are driven by mechanisms that are simple enough to be described. So if the above numbers are naturally organized whole numbers, then after 10 comes 11. If it happens that 12 shows up instead of 11, the numbers are not what they apparently look like. Or has entropy sneaked in?
Not necessarily. The numbers can have something in common apart from being natural integers organized in ascending order. The development after 12 will clue what it is.

Trends can be described by equations. Here is one in particular: y = ae^(x/b). An exponential function like that sends sooner or later the y values sky high -- theoretically. But in practical applications, infinity is just a concept. And so, if you see a trend based on an exponential function, there will be a change in one point -- there will be a departure from the established pattern. Here is an example showing historical S&P 500.



How about this index closing at 70 trillion points?
If the trend given by the exponential function is let to be continued, then eventually this number will be reached. But there are usually practical obstacles, and the particular question is when the curve changes its direction and how the detour will look like. In the case of S&P 500, a new function based on y = sin x kicked in. You can call it "boom and bust trigonometry."

All those financial instruments that have created this frankenstein which replaced the original function are in place, and so the market is heading up once again to reach its peak in five years or so and then the bust takes place. But this apparent periodicity may not continue due to the metal fatigue exerted on those dubious financial instruments that drive this trend.

Once you detect a prevalent exponential growth in any financial/economic development, there will be point in the future where this development gives way to other trend. You can practice on the national debt and play Nostradamus using realistic tools of prediction.



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by bryanku
reply to post by THX-1138
 


It's an inverse etf, my cash position is irrelevant. I have lubed the proper orifices if you TA junkies decide to take me for a ride in the coming weeks.


Hopefully it isn't a leverage etf?



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 08:16 PM
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Yes hopefully not, those hurt going the wrong way on you

We are at 1032 right now in the futures on SP500 (Up 7)


30 MIN CHART

[edit on 23-8-2009 by GreenBicMan]



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by bryanku
 


They already have.

2nd line



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 08:36 PM
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reply to post by GreenBicMan
 


Well, yes, if your definition of sustained is 5 months then they have. That timeframe doesn't really qualify as 'sustained' but the percentage increase is impressive nonetheless. GS making a billion a day of this irrational crap. Lessons are learned in trading, I may learn mine catching the knife... but I am trading on gains made from a short dollar position I had when the dxy was at 86.



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 08:37 PM
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Originally posted by GreenBicMan
Yes hopefully not, those hurt going the wrong way on you

We are at 1032 right now in the futures on SP500 (Up 7)


30 MIN CHART

[edit on 23-8-2009 by GreenBicMan]


Those etfs are really pieces of crap. They're good for very short term trades and that is it. ETF's in general are usually major POS.



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 08:39 PM
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reply to post by stander
 


OK if we do our homework on the national debt and the function yields a non sustainable rise, the problem becomes a little different than the S&P example.

Your best solution produces a second function that works to devalue the debt faster than it is rising. If the debt function were to reach a crisis level that suddenly terminated with an asymptotic elimination of the debt it could lead to WW3.



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 08:42 PM
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reply to post by RetinoidReceptor
 


Yeah unless you had an opp. to short SKF at 300 or something hahaha

There is a lot of talk about ouright banning those more and more



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 08:50 PM
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reply to post by bryanku
 


I see


I just dont see how you can be short in a market that is screaming to go higher

I am a contrarian as well though, but picked up the bullishness in early dow 7000's, again based on technicals



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 08:53 PM
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U.S. May See 150-200 More Bank Failures: Bove

Can the FDIC dig it.


A prominent banking analyst said Sunday that 150 to 200 more U.S. banks will fail in the current banking crisis, and the industry's payments to keep the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp afloat could eat up 25 percent of pretax income in 2010.


www.cnbc.com...



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 08:57 PM
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Millions Face Shrinking Social Security Payments

www.cnbc.com...

Week Ahead: Stocks Riding Momentum Wave Higher

www.cnbc.com...



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 09:01 PM
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reply to post by GreenBicMan
 





I just dont see how you can be short in a market that is screaming to go higher


There was a pullback on the 14th, I played FAZ for a day and made a profit but went long again when the technicals turned against me. People that are looking for a top to this rally go short when they think they see a top. One of these times they may be right but it can get real expensive if you stay in a leveraged ETF overnight when the trend is against you.



posted on Aug, 23 2009 @ 09:15 PM
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There's usually a simple way that actually works a lot of the times. If the market has moved in the same direction for more than 4 days, it is usually safe to go the opposite of where it was heading for ONE day. The markets have moved in the same direction like 5 days...if it goes up again on Monday then going short wouldn't be so stupid. But of course that is really gambling, but with pretty decent odds.



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 12:30 AM
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Originally posted by fromunclexcommunicate
reply to post by stander
 


OK if we do our homework on the national debt and the function yields a non sustainable rise, the problem becomes a little different than the S&P example.

Your best solution produces a second function that works to devalue the debt faster than it is rising. If the debt function were to reach a crisis level that suddenly terminated with an asymptotic elimination of the debt it could lead to WW3.

Of course the hypothetical changes to the curve that describes the growth of the national debt are not bound to follow the transition shown in S&P 500. The initial and important task is to find the inflection point on the exponential curve -- the point where the exponential curve will be changing its shape no longer definable by the exponential function. You can use an extreme condition and ask what would be he consequence of the national debt if it is $5 quadrillion right now. In other words, what would the Treasury auction look like? (It would turn invisible.) Then you scale down and repeat the process until you reach the point where the consequences of the growth would prevent the curve to continue in the given direction.

You can put yourself back to 1996 and attempt to find the inflection point on the S&P 500 curve. The following development clearly shows that the inflection point wasn't caused by unrelated intervention; the inflection point occurred as a necessary consequence of the unsustainable exponential growth.

The national debt curve won't very likely follow the human population exponential growth where the slope of the curve doesn't already follow by a tiny bit the one given by the regression. In the case of the national debt, the slope change would be pretty apparent. Actually the curve may turn out not to be differentiable for the reason that there would be no curve at all, coz there would be no debt. Poof. It takes one word and all the trillions are off the books -- to put all the options on the table with an extreme and easy to compute option on top.



[edit on 8/24/2009 by stander]



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 12:57 AM
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Originally posted by marg6043
Millions Face Shrinking Social Security Payments

www.cnbc.com...

It's an accounting fraud designed by guys who subscribe to the same shortsighted philosophy of dealing with things that Hitler used in connection with Jews. He thought that chasing the Jews out of Germany would solve the problem. But it didn't and the Auschwitz solution kicked in.



posted on Aug, 24 2009 @ 02:07 AM
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The binge has began. At NIKKEI the winners outnumber the losers 36 to 1. There is a very good chance of Santa paying $4 per gallon at the gas station to fill the gas tank of his sled. The middle class will start paying for every bailout penny through a nice accounting trick.



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