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The "up-to-the-minute Market Data" thread

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posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by Hx3_1963
 


Haven't you got any more figures for us?




posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 04:05 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 
Trying to keep the data flowin' daddy'o...

Got to keep the masses of 1 or 2 happy...

===
Feeder Cattle 93.40 -0.325
Pork Bellies 89.05 0.05
Lean Hogs 60.55 0.075
Live Cattle 82.825 -1.50
===
Cocoa 2561 3
Coffee 112.95 -2.85
Cotton 44.39 1.05
Lumber 146.60 -1.61
Orange Juice 76.95 -0.40
Sugar 13.47 -0.23
===
Corn 386.25 -0.75
Oats 193 -2.50
Rice 12.015 -0.36
Soybeans 904.50 -12.50
===
Crude Oil 48.54 -3.84
Heating Oil 1.346 -0.086
Natural Gas 3.631 -0.316
Propane 0.644 -0.040
===
Gas $1.385

There...how's that!


[edit on 3/30/2009 by Hx3_1963]



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by Hx3_1963
 


It'll do for a start.



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 
Star 4 U!

A start?!? A start you say?!?

Aye Lad, don't make me break out my Supercontabulatorrandomcondrumdon!


BK OF AMERICA CP 6.03 4:00PM ET -1.31 (-17.85%) 484,258,567
CITIGROUP INC 2.31 4:00PM ET -0.31 (-11.83%) 447,266,016
===
New Highs 8 5 6 99
New Lows 66 36 43 520



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by Hastobemoretolife
 


"The ratings on Ireland could be lowered again if the public finances weaken substantially further than what we currently assume," said Ciaran O'Hagan, head of fixed-income strategy in Paris at Societe Generale. "The outlook could be revised to stable if the government embraces a fiscal strategy that contains a rise in the "public debt burden" in line with Ireland's modest economic growth prospects."


Blackmail anyone? Would seem good ole Ireland has ticked off the directors of the downfall. Not following the rules of the financial armagedon will get you down graded until you fall inline with everyone else and enslave your people.



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 04:42 PM
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Told 'Ya So (Again: Pensions - PBGC)


Oops.

Under Millard's strategy, the pension agency was directed to invest 55 percent of its funds in stocks and real estate. That included 20 percent in US stocks, 19 percent in foreign stocks, 6 percent in what the agency's records term "emerging market" stocks, 5 percent in private real estate and 5 percent in private equity firms.

What I warned of was the potential loss of your private pensions a few months back, if you remember.

Here's the formula for your impending doom, if you forgot:

1.
The S&P 500 goes to 300 as the "bailouts" and "handouts" collapse the economy.
2.
The PGGC's equity investments are worth 20 cents on the dollar, the private equity and REITs are zeros. This puts the fund 40% underwater across-the-board.
3.
It is unable to pay and goes to Congress.
4.
Congress can't fund additional borrowing because the bond market has dislocated.
5.
You get 10 cents on the dollar for your supposedly 'guaranteed' pension.

Oh, and your Social Security and Medicare are cut by half (or more) too due to #4 at the same time.

Congratulations America, this is the price of remaining asleep while the robber barons fleece the Treasury.

Still think you ought to watch American Idol eh?

I give this two, maybe three years before it plays out.



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 04:56 PM
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You can't make this stuff up....

Banks Starting to Walk Away on Foreclosures


SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Mercy James thought she had lost her rental property here to foreclosure. A date for a sheriff’s sale had been set, and notices about the foreclosure process were piling up in her mailbox.

Ms. James had the tenants move out, and soon her white house at the corner of Thomas and Maple Streets fell into the hands of looters and vandals, and then, into disrepair. Dejected and broke, Ms. James said she salvaged but a lesson from her loss.

So imagine her surprise when the City of South Bend contacted her recently, demanding that she resume maintenance on the property. The sheriff’s sale had been canceled at the last minute, leaving the property title — and a world of trouble — in her name.

“I thought, ‘What kind of game is this?’ ” Ms. James, 41, said while picking at trash at the house, now so worthless the city plans to demolish it — another bill for which she will be liable.

City officials and housing advocates here and in cities as varied as Buffalo, Kansas City, Mo., and Jacksonville, Fla., say they are seeing an unsettling development: Banks are quietly declining to take possession of properties at the end of the foreclosure process, most often because the cost of the ordeal — from legal fees to maintenance — exceeds the diminishing value of the real estate.

The so-called bank walkaways rarely mean relief for the property owners, caught unaware months after the fact, and often mean additional financial burdens and bureaucratic headaches. Technically, they still owe on the mortgage, but as a practicality, rarely would a mortgage holder receive any more payments on the loan. The way mortgages are bundled and resold, it can be enormously time-consuming just trying to determine what company holds the loan on a property thought to be in foreclosure.

In Ms. James’s case, the company that was most recently servicing her loan is now defunct. Its parent company filed for bankruptcy and dissolved. And the original bank that sold her the loan said it could not find a record of it.

“It is what some of us think is the next wave of the crisis,” said Kermit Lind, a clinical professor at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law and an expert on foreclosure law.

More at link

On the Geopolitical front

Gates: U.S. Not Prepared to Respond to N.K Missile Launch


The United States can do nothing to stop North Korea from breaking international law in the next 10 days by firing a missile that is unlikely to be shot down by the U.S. or its allies, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Sunday.

Appearing on "FOX News Sunday," Gates said North Korea "probably will" fire the missile, prompting host Chris Wallace to ask: "And there's nothing we can do about it?"

"No," Gates answered, adding, "I would say we're not prepared to do anything about it."

more at link

Deutsche Bank’s Banziger Says Crisis ‘Far From Over’


Deutsche Bank AG Chief Risk Officer Hugo Banziger said the global credit crisis is “far from over” and global financial regulations must be overhauled to regain investor trust.

“We are in the middle of it,” Banziger, 53, said today at an event at the Frankfurt School of Finance and Management. The industry has “an opportunity” to build a stable financial system that seeks higher capital buffers, and encourage investors to return money to the market and help stem the crisis, he said.

Deutsche Bank in February reported its first annual deficit in more than 50 years after the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression pummeled bond and stock trading. The crisis has caused $1.3 trillion in losses for financial companies worldwide, a total that may climb to more than $3 trillion, Banziger said today, citing forecasts.

Deutsche Bank has gained 40 percent this month in Frankfurt trading, valuing the bank at 18 billion euros ($24 billion), and eclipsing the 5 percent advance in the Bloomberg Europe Banks and Financial Services Index of 65 companies. The bank fell 10 percent to 28.75 euros in trading today.

The German bank skirted the worst of the U.S. subprime mortgage collapse by betting against the bonds that contributed to credit losses and writedowns at the world’s largest financial companies and forced government-led bailouts from Berlin to London to Washington.

More at link



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by redhatty
 



Banks are quietly declining to take possession of properties at the end of the foreclosure process, most often because the cost of the ordeal — from legal fees to maintenance — exceeds the diminishing value of the real esta


That is just dandy! Swell! Swellerino! Neat! Neat-o! Honestly, I think I am going to be sick. Nothing is getting better. We need Dick Cheney back in power. (That was a joke, the thing about Dick Cheney.....)



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 05:15 PM
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reply to post by redhatty
 


There is going to be decades of class action suits by the time this is over. Even when the market does recover and everything some how miraculously holds together, it is still going to be a roller coaster ride because companies won't be able to pay out the judgments or settlements. Considering that America is even a 1/10 of what it is now.



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by xoxo stacie
 


I agree, out of billions of people there is a group of no more than a hundred or so # it up for everyone.

Would be nice if they just arrested them and threw them in prison for the rest of their lives.



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 05:18 PM
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Some interesting figures fell at the foot of my pole today,not sure of "source" but with farmers poised to plant the largest yields of soybeans and corn ever but the the demand has rapidly diminished.

Soybeans are predicted to drop 28% and will fall below 6.50 a bushel
and corn (I live in the middle of HUGE corn fields) 31% and will drop below 2.50 a bushel.

This is bad.

It will again as in the case of the ethenol bunch who bought crops on contract and then the bottom fell out,they broke the contracts and didn't buy the crops leaving the farmers with TONS of grain and no place to sell it.

The cost of seed and fuel has been awful...many will go under no doubt.



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 05:27 PM
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reply to post by irishchic
 


That reminds me of something that happened a few decades back called the Great Depression.

Deja Vu. It happening all over again almost exactly the same.

[edit on 30-3-2009 by Hastobemoretolife]



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 05:29 PM
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Originally posted by Hastobemoretolife
There is going to be decades of class action suits by the time this is over. Even when the market does recover and everything some how miraculously holds together, it is still going to be a roller coaster ride because companies won't be able to pay out the judgments or settlements. Considering that America is even a 1/10 of what it is now.


I hope your right.

Let me elaborate on that comment...

I hope there is still a country with a government that at least resembles how our .gov should be (kinda like now) and a judicial system still in effect that will allow for class action suits to be both filed and heard.

Because, seriously, if or elected officials and their appointees cannot get it together and start doing something that will truly work to fix the problems that caused this economic mess, we won't have a government or judiciary to turn to before it is all over.



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by Hastobemoretolife
 



Gulp...louder gulp.

I felt "something" bother me when I read the numbers but didn't know exactly what or why because usually I try to avoid most ag-related issues as they normally mean government involvement and parerwork.

You are absolutely and frighteningly correct.



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by Hastobemoretolife
reply to post by irishchic
 


That reminds me of something that happened a few decades back called the Great Depression.

Deja Vu. It happening all over again almost exactly the same.

[edit on 30-3-2009 by Hastobemoretolife]


Ahh yes but you see no one is being reminded. So that no one will panic and rush to the store. We couldn't have the whole of the population being prepared and all. That would defeat the whole purpose of the crash in the first place.
" Last one standing with ALL the money/power wins."

[edit on 30-3-2009 by xoxo stacie]



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 05:41 PM
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DESCENT INTO THE DEPTHS (1930):

The Collapse of Agriculture

Here's a nice read on what we have to look forward to...and notice the dates...similar???



Edit: Fixed Linky...


[edit on 3/30/2009 by Hx3_1963]



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 05:59 PM
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Originally posted by Hx3_1963
DESCENT INTO THE DEPTHS (1930):

The Collapse of Agriculture
www.futurecasts.com...'30.html

Here's a nice read on what we have to look forward to...and notice the dates...similar???




[edit on 3/30/2009 by Hx3_1963]


The page cannot be found
The page you are looking for might have been removed, had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable.


can't get it to open. xoxo

Edit: tyty Hx


[edit on 30-3-2009 by xoxo stacie]



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 06:03 PM
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Sorry...fixed it...

I hate it when urls' use dashes and other symbols in them..

After looking through the site...it's all good info about The Great Depression...




[edit on 3/30/2009 by Hx3_1963]



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 06:08 PM
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reply to post by redhatty
 


I was trying to be a little optimistic Red!


But those are about my thoughts too, It was just on the news that China has come out and said that China in not lending anymore money right now.
- I don't know what that emoticon is supposed to be, but I'd like to think it is firmly extending the middle digit, and I would like to extend that to oligarchs and their minions that put us in this situation.

reply to post by xoxo stacie
 


Yep, instead they would rather risk their own lives for power. I wonder if it has crossed their minds that there won't be anything left for them to control. I don't favor their fate that they are bringing upon themselves, I'd rather see them indicted and thrown into hole somewhere for the rest of eternity, that is 35 grand a year I would gladly contribute too.

reply to post by irishchic
 


Yea, its actually quite frightening. This go around it is about 10 times worse. That is no good. It also doesn't help that TPTB's only solution to this mess is to go bigger and "better". They will absolutely not give up any power under any consequences even if it means death for them.

_____

This is my proposed plan to "fix" this mess, tell the government to back off and let the market hit bottom and stay out of our business because we don't need any people that have never worked a real job in their lives breathing down our necks telling us what and what not to do.



posted on Mar, 30 2009 @ 06:12 PM
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Originally posted by marg6043
I think I am losing my mind.


I was getting so punch-drunk that I had to go spend a few days totally ignoring the economy.


Here's something that I found interesting:

Many of GM’s dealers will receive lavish buyouts as an inducement to close their doors, for a total cost in the billions of dollars. That’s disgusting, but it’s required both by GM’s contracts with them and by the welter of state laws that protect the dealers. (If you want to know who the political power brokers are in any given city or town, look for the car dealers.)

This is going to be kept scrupulously out of the news, because car dealers contribute huge sums to every last man and woman in Congress and the Senate. The public was ready to torch the private residences of AIG executives, but they won’t make a peep about paying billions of their own hard-earned dollars to provide a cushy retirement for thousands of already-rich auto dealers.


Much, much more at this link: General Motors Hurtles Toward Bankruptcy

And yes, the .gov will let them go into bankruptcy. The bad news is that they're so broke that we're going to wind up paying for them to operate in bankruptcy. Talk about a lose-lose for the taxpayer, eh?

[edit on 30-3-2009 by theWCH]



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