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The "up-to-the-minute Market Data" thread

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posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 02:36 PM
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reply to post by DangerDeath
 


You know, all these bailouts have gotten under my skin, but haven't actually gotten me really P.O.'d.

Just reading that made me shake a little. This s very unnerving, I don't know what it is, the fact that we are going to sit here and let this happen to us or the fact that people want to do something about but don't have the cajones to do anything about it.

This is all getting to be ridiculous. The banks make out like bandits and we the taxpayer are going to take all the losses. I see the gov defaulting no later than the end of 2010.

Between, TARP, The first Stimulus, The second Stimulus, the Fed monetizing a trillion in debt, the Fed loaning out trillions, and now "Enron" for our entire financial system I don't know how much longer this scherade can last.

[edit on 23-3-2009 by Hastobemoretolife]




posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by Hastobemoretolife
 


Don't get me wrong, but people's only "mechanism" to organize and act against this thievery is their government, that is the whole point, isn't it?

Any attempt to organize beside this legal form of government will be treated as treason and terrorism.

Justice, which is the "independent" arm to make sure things go by the book... is paralyzed and assimilated by the Borg.

In a world where people don't trust each other, it is impossible to organize against corrupted and organized (and well armed) enemy.

A serious change in life attitude is needed between the people in the first place.



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by DangerDeath
 
Careful with the "Borg" stuff there...


Dow Jones Industrial Average 7,717.95 3:32pm ET 439.57 (6.04%)
Dow Jones Industrial Average 7,729.34 3:47pm ET 450.96 (6.20%)
Dow Jones Industrial Average 7,743.44 3:50pm ET 465.06 (6.39%)
Dow Jones Industrial Average 7,752.36 3:52pm ET 473.98 (6.51%)

S&P 500 INDEX,RTH 816.05 3:32pm ET 47.51 (6.18%)
S&P 500 INDEX,RTH 819.39 3:52pm ET 50.85 (6.62%)

Looks like no one wants to miss this move...

[edit on 3/23/2009 by Hx3_1963]



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 02:54 PM
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Please look at our top gainers for the day.....
Name Last %Change
AMCE 1.25 +158.26%
PED 1.49 +60.22%
FTBK 1.47 +50.00%



The Money Men!!!!


Total collapse is a bid away!!!



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 02:55 PM
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"A serious change in life attitude is needed between the people in the first place"

SO true my friend,so true. I overheard a snooty 30 something gym-diva this am complain when one of us "regulars" wanted to watch MSNBC while doing our cardio,she basically said:"I'm sick of all this money-crap,it doesn't have ANYTHING to do with me or MY family and I don't want to hear any more about it..."


Very typical of this age group from what I've seen.They have few or no "investments" or savings,they have payment books and live their lives (MUCH better then we do,on the surface!) according to "Can I pay the minimum every month...?" while complaining they have to work anything close to 40 hours a week.It's ALL about the next trip,the next purchase,the next,the new,the now.

So...when we basically have an ENTIRE generation of entitled and spoiled humans who are PERFECTLY content to either bury their heads in the sand,pop pills or self-medicate in some way so as to avoid reality,or otherwise refuse to be accountable for either their actions or for educating themselves,where oh where do we even begin???

I despair and fear that it's already too late.
When the very people we THOUGHT were supposed to set an example are the ones scrooming us,it's just too messed up.

There has been NO exapmle set for a very long time: my grandparents (who lived through the end of the Depression and remembered putting newspapers in their shoes) taught me how to work and how to save.
I don't think the current batch of "American Idols" (not bashing the show,it's fun) would begin to listen to such words of wisdom like,"It's not what you make,it's what you KEEP!"
Sighing loudly here...even a tear.

[edit on 23-3-2009 by irishchic]



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:04 PM
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Here's yer big story...notice the last one?




US Gambling 150.76 13.50 9.84% 15:43
Broker Dealer 80.58 8.70 12.10% 15:53
Banks 30.42 4.38 16.82% 15:53
Paper 29.04 2.90 11.09% 15:52
===
Dow Jones Industrial Average 7,775.62 4:02pm ET 497.24 (6.83%)
S&P 500 INDEX,RTH 823.05 4:04pm ET 54.51 (7.09%)
NASDAQ Composite 1,555.77 4:04pm ET 98.50 (6.76%)

[edit on 3/23/2009 by Hx3_1963]



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:05 PM
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Have you considered another possibility? Maybe there is a new, solid trend showing up?

I have read in today’s Newsweek (Polish edition), that the number of new housing investments in the US has significantly grown in February, for the first time after many months of stagnation.

So maybe we are all wrong?
Maybe these are really the signs of returning prosperity?



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:11 PM
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reply to post by DangerDeath
 


This entitlement mentality has got to go. SS, medicare and medicaid should have never been implemented, all it did was allow businesses to gouge consumers. Same with medical insurance.

If none of these entitlements were ever put into practice everything would be affordable. The thing that really blows my lid is the people that think a bigger government means more freedom.

Ok enough ranting I could go on about this for days.

These evil pricks are going to pump the market up to around 8500 getting rich on the up swing. Then they are going short the hell out of the market and get even richer on the way down. Where it stops nobody knows.

Then when 1Q reports come out AIG, BofA, Citi, etc are all going to report losses, because this latest scam is nothing more that allowing the banks to shuffle around toxic assets that nobody wants.

Judd Greg was on TV a few minutes ago saying that "we" will probably see a 15 billion return by the end of the year. Great now what about the 155 billion that was knowingly legislated and what about the few trillion the Fed added to its balance sheet.


www.abovetopsecret.com...

No, like always they report only onside of the story. A page or two back some people already discussed this and what they didn't report is that foreclosure percentage went up.

All the housing report tells us is that there are a lot of suckers who think they got a good deal on a home that they still over payed for by 100 grand or more. Also a lot of investors are buying up foreclosures for half the original cost of the home, which is what the house should have sold for originally.

[edit on 23-3-2009 by Hastobemoretolife]



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:13 PM
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Originally posted by twilightzone
Have you considered another possibility? Maybe there is a new, solid trend showing up?

I have read in today’s Newsweek (Polish edition), that the number of new housing investments in the US has significantly grown in February, for the first time after many months of stagnation.

So maybe we are all wrong?
Maybe these are really the signs of returning prosperity?


The government is attempting to get the credit flowing so consumers can get into debt again. The way the government, who has no capital, will do this, is print more money and borrow. Foreign investors are already leery of the size of government debt. So they will have to raise more taxes eventually too (which Obama already has said he would do).

There was never widespread prosperity. Only for those who had savings and were prudent with their money. The rest were in debt.

The GDP needs to decrease at least by 20% (all the credit that will leave the system) and many major banks must be sold off to smaller ones in order to have a real economy imo. I also think our economy must produce things as well. If we don't have these things then this economy is NOT prosperous and will just suffer again from another shock if the government is successful in inflating everything (which will hurt you and I),



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:14 PM
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I'd LOVE to believe that!

Grocery store this am: less on shelves than I have EVER seen with higher prices.Few people shopping.
And this am the news said that basically Texas is still doing much better than the rest of the US...not seeing it.
Everyone I know in the "service industries" has slowed down and new work/contracts aren't coming because the big jobs can't get financed.
Gym had a "help wanted" sign on the door for a $10.00 an hour position and over 150 people have filled out an ap!
This is in a rural area,not a city.
Cattle prices are atrocious,not even the "show calfs" came close to value at this weekend's sale...feed/seed/hay...all at record highs.
Many are saying we'll have to "sell the herd" by May or so unless something gives (you keep some for an ag exempt if possible) and the newly-built commercial properties are VACANT for the most part.
I wish,seriously.

[edit on 23-3-2009 by irishchic]



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:17 PM
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reply to post by Hastobemoretolife
 





You know, all these bailouts have gotten under my skin, but haven't actually gotten me really P.O.'d. Just reading that made me shake a little.


Looks like someone needs to take a break!!!!!


Sorry man...I couldn't resist.

What's funny is...if you rob a bank...you have to use a firearm or something like that...if the bank robs you...they just use the government to do it.

Good times.



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by twilightzone
 


Building houses is NOT prosperity...



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:23 PM
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Moody's cuts GE rating two notches, outlook stable
www.reuters.com...

BOSTON (Reuters) - Moody's Investor Service cut General Electric Co's (GE.N) top-tier credit rating by two notches -- deeper than rival Standard & Poor's downgrade -- and said its outlook on the biggest U.S. conglomerate is now stable.

That new outlook -- which means no additional cuts are likely in the next 12 to 18 months -- helped shares of the world's biggest maker of jet engines and electricity-producing turbines rise 9 percent on Monday.

The move lifted one of the big worries facing GE investors, who have already digested a 68 percent dividend reduction and the S&P downgrade 11 days ago. A deeper cut could have put GE on the hook for billions of dollars in collateral calls.

Moody's now rates GE and its GE Capital finance unit "Aa2," down from the former "Aaa." Its short-term rating on the company is unchanged at its top level of "P-1."
More at Link...

...As stated earlier...the new down is up...


[edit on 3/23/2009 by Hx3_1963]



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:24 PM
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Originally posted by twilightzone
Have you considered another possibility? Maybe there is a new, solid trend showing up?..

...So maybe we are all wrong?
Maybe these are really the signs of returning prosperity?

I'll just chip in with a brief reply. Others have already given detailed arguments against such a conclusion.

Economic stability and growth can only be built on fundamental strengths such as thriving businesses, secure, well-capitalized banks and affordable government spending.

Let us know when you see signs of these returning, and you'll be able to convince level-headed economists and laymen alike that the current rally is anything but froth.



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:25 PM
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reply to post by David9176
 




I hear ya, I've been paying attention, just not as undivided as I have been.

Just that excerpt of that article just really got me P.O.'d.

I just know we are about the get completely bent over, yet lots of people are oblivious to what is happening.

Most of the world is financially illiterate and it shows. We are modern day slaves and the slave master is a worthless piece of paper that has an enforced value by the way of the gun.



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 



HAD to smile at your "Funeral March" status.

Not sure it it's meant to amuse but it helped me today.
Mine was intended to read: "Climbing out of the black hole of gloom" but it kept cutting me off when I tried to post.
You WILL notice however I figured out how to post graphs,with your instruction and I thank you kindly.
Look out now,I'll become a chart/graph 'ho.

Edit...CHIT,I can't speell today,LOL!



[edit on 23-3-2009 by irishchic]

[edit on 23-3-2009 by irishchic]



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:32 PM
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...And in other news...

U.S. housing rescue threatened by second liens
www.reuters.com...

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Treasury Department's effort to help 5 million homeowners win reworked mortgages, part of a plan to stabilize housing, could fall flat if Wall Street does not relax its interest in the properties.

While the initiative empowers Fannie Mae (FNM.P) and Freddie Mac (FRE.P) to refinance borrowers whose homes have lost value in recent years, big banks own a small stake in many of those loans and could effectively block the plan.

Those relatively modest investments, or second liens, allow lenders to veto the refinancing plan and they might do so since those small stakes add up to big dollars.

Bank of America (BAC.N) held $148 billion in second liens at the end of last year, while JPMorgan Chase (JPM.N) held $131.4 billion and Wells Fargo & Co. (WFC.N) held $129.9 billion, according to Inside Mortgage Finance.

Since Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were effectively nationalized in September, the government has used the mortgage-finance companies to try and alleviate the housing crisis. Private banks, however, are more difficult to control.

Last week, the Treasury Department hosted a meeting of large mortgage servicers to discuss the question of second liens and the broader housing rescue.

Big lenders generally support the housing rescue plan but have misgivings about Treasury's intentions for second liens, several industry sources said.

"The (housing rescue) plan does nothing to benefit the second lien beyond attempting to provide a framework that allows the first lien to perform and get paid," said Terry Francisco, a spokesperson for Bank of America.

The plan does not make clear whether the second lien holder will ever get paid off, but if the first lien continues to perform, odds improve for the health of the second mortgage, Francisco said. He hopes the discussions with Treasury lead to a workable process to deal with second liens.
More at Link...

...Uh Huh...yep...alrighty...sure...

I guess it's all OK now and I can climb out from under this rock...



Fee jump could dampen U.S. trading tactics and volumes
www.reuters.com...

[edit on 3/23/2009 by Hx3_1963]



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by irishchic
 


Yep, black humour, I'm afraid.

Looking forward to those graphs. (Though I can guess which way they'll be pointing...
)




posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by Hx3_1963
 


Nooooo....don't leave! We have cookies under the rock!

I don't believe 95% of what's being written or spoken currently.



posted on Mar, 23 2009 @ 03:40 PM
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OK...if fact I kind of like it under there...nice and cool...


Credit bubble looms as investors rush in
www.reuters.com...

LONDON (Reuters) - A bubble could be building up in the credit markets, fueled by investor demand for an asset class with low prices and attractive yields, the head of hedge fund Polar Capital (POLR.L: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) said.

"Some people are looking at credit to the exclusion of everything else," Chief Executive Mark Kary said at the Reuters Hedge Funds and Private Equity Summit in London.

"There is a pretty scary consensus around ... a lot of people are chasing the same idea."

Kary said investors were attracted to credit because it looked incredibly cheap. This is because the market is building in historical default rates, he said, but these could turn out to be even worse than the market was pricing in.

"The global economy is in some sort of free fall. I don't know if there is anybody living that has seen anything like it." Polar Capital (POLR.L: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz), a UK-listed firm running long/short equity hedge funds and traditional fund, does not invest in credit, but Kary said a lot of hedge funds were focusing in on this area.

"In January last year, the three things people were looking at were commodities, real estate and emerging markets," Kary said. "Arguably they were the three disaster trades of last year."

"This year everyone is looking at credit, distressed (debt) and CTA's," Kary said. "Every man and his dog is raising money for distressed."

CTAs -- Commodity Trading Advisers, or managed futures, follow trends in futures markets.

Last year, the worst year on record for the $1.4 trillion hedge fund industry, managed futures returned 18.33 percent, making them the best-performing strategy and one of only two to make money, according to Credit Suisse/Tremont.

In the first two months of 2009, however, they are down 0.72 percent.

Investors have turned to credit for its attractive yields relative to cash and weak equity markets, where companies are cutting or scrapping dividends.

Investors' insatiable appetite for corporate bonds has helped companies issue more than a billion euros of bonds so far this year partly to refinance short-term debt and boost reserves of cash to help them through the recession.

But there is a risk of the market getting overheated and of returns getting eroded because so many investors are piling in.

The credit markets are cheap because companies' bonds have fallen sharply to reflect the grim economic climate, which could bring a wave of defaults on corporate bonds and other debt.
And more talk of credit...they just want us buried in debt...dang...can't they see we're already past our eyeballs in it?



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