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Survival Apparel

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posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 06:58 PM
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The thread the other day by northern raider about boots got me to thinking about other products/items people here like and depend on. I've seen alot of threads about BOB's, stockpiling foods, etc... but cant find one dedicated to things like boots, gloves, coats, etc...

So if you wouldnt mind sharing what types of clothing items you would depend on in Sit-X, I would appreciate it.

Myself.
Boots Warm, cold-Danner Very Cold-Bunny Boots or mukluks Boots
Pants Filson Tin Pants
Socks Wigwams
Shirts Pendleton
Jacket Cold-Filson Double Mackinaw Very Cold Fleece lined parka with wolverine trim
Hat Warm-Filson Packer Hat, Cold-Kromer, Very Cold-Beaver trapper style
Gloves Everyday workgloves, just as long its leather I dont care, for cold conditions I prefer heavy surplus millitary

Other. Wool pants from Bemidji Woolen Mills. Thermals from DuFold, and Raingear from H. Hansen




posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:20 PM
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if you wanted to go a little lighter weight you could get some underarmour coldgear shirt and pants. they also have fleece hoodies, etc. it's a tighter fit but would add to some movement, etc.

with some good socks and a decent pair of pac boots and some good gloves along with some medium range outerwear you'd be doing pretty well, i'd think

that's dependent on where you live, of course

***edited to complete my thought





[edit on 15-10-2008 by Barathrum]



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by salchanra
 
This is only in response to the quarry, but I'd go with the most advanced synthetics possible...camoflouge too. I utilize alot of Cabela's product line satsisfactorily, but not without making some of my own modifications to some garments. Best to keep in mind that conditions can change suddenly, so if you get one garment that is waterproof + insulated you're better off. I personally would endorse 'DryPlus' as readily as 'GoreTex' & it's less expensive. Also, anything that'd have to be repaired in the field is a big minus; invest carefully.



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 05:00 AM
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With clothing I tend to use modified civilian or security industry products, but on occasion I will use plain coloured military clothing IE my black SAS smock. I do have DPM cammo gore tex kit but that is only useful out in the boonies, and as discussed in depth on many forums we survivalists do not want to attract attention to ourselves OR to look like soldiers.

My kit normally is either
Modified Lee Jeans or Regatta Cargo Pants (extra pockets and waterproofed with TX10 or similar)
Acrylic micro fleece or heavy cotton polos as under layer
Sweat shirt or fleece shirt as mid layer
Now I do admit I like the Mil Spec flleces and Soft shells like the ones produced by Tad gear, but I dont have Tad gear money, So I buy plain black proprietary branded fleeces like Berghaus, Regatta, North Face etc and modify them with much needed extra pockets and other bits ( Nylon wear pads on elbows, Velco Patch mounting points, extra pockets, replace draw cord with HD elastic cord, etc)
In # weather I used a Dare2Be Black softshell tactical jacket thats fleece lined, again modified with better draw cord material extra pockets etc)
My only extravegance is some gloves, I use Kona Cycling gloves which cost £25, because they fit better than most tactical gloves.

Footwear is normally Karrimor KSB approach shoes in black, but they appear to wear out far to fast, So I am now seeking opinions on the sexy looking Magnum Spider Elite 5.0 s shoes (not boots as I drive a lot), I have Magnum combat boots for urban tactical use, and Altberg high leg combats for out in the boonies.
Other bits are a biege No Fear baseball cap, and Western leather Company ranger belt ( In the UK we just dont make decent quality leather belts, its all imported #e from China).

Timepiece is a Citizen Solar powered mil spec watch, as again I cant afford a self winding rolex.

We need to be dressed as best as we can, with the best quality stuff we can afford, that does the job we need, but we dont need to look like we are SAS wannabes or Rambos because WTSHTF the last thing we need is to attract attention to ourselves.

I often cringe when I see pictures of folks Bug out gear in really attractive and desirable top notch bags, with lots of expensive bits on the outside, This is only going to attract unwanted attention from people who could be better armed and skilled than we are, and we could lose everything. Buy top notch kit by all means but dont flaunt it.



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 05:50 AM
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Originally posted by Anonymous ATS
reply to post by salchanra
 
This is only in response to the quarry, but I'd go with the most advanced synthetics possible...camoflouge too. I utilize alot of Cabela's product line satsisfactorily, but not without making some of my own modifications to some garments. Best to keep in mind that conditions can change suddenly, so if you get one garment that is waterproof + insulated you're better off. I personally would endorse 'DryPlus' as readily as 'GoreTex' & it's less expensive. Also, anything that'd have to be repaired in the field is a big minus; invest carefully.



With respect what use is synthetic kit in a hign fire risk area like cities or say west coast US of A areas, Sythetics melt into the skin if you get to near a fire of any kind, in those areas modern cotton clothes are much better suited for wicking sweat away are preventing you getting horribly burnt, and what use is cammo kit in a city or desert ?, at best you will stick out like a sore thumb, at worst you will attract attention to yourself. Cammoflage means blending into your environment, be it pretending to be a shrub in a forest, or a fresher on campus, or a banker in the city. You dress to disappear not to look like your going to war.



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 06:00 AM
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NR I disagree on the whole dpm issue, a lot of my kit is ex-army, cause I was in the army and it was what I was issued with, ergo I don't see any reason to avoid this gear I've got due to colour specs. Maybe it's a US issue that has weeviled its way into the public imagination in the UK???
Incidentally I recall from my time in the forces the same paranoia about taking olive drab or dpm bergens home on leave. Because of a few one-off incidents it was seen as a terrorist threat!!
The whole, "Don't wear anything camoflage, green etc cause you'll make yourself a target" mentality isn't very helpful or entirely realistic. In fact I even would go as far to say we are encouraging a 'paranoid-complex' if we focus on dpm colour attraction dynamics.
If anything the same argument could go for a bright colour attracting the eye and standing out. Marking you as an easy touch.

In fact it might actually discourage the idiots and opportunists out there from considering us a bunch of amateur ramblers to be honest.

We humble minded Brits seem to have this lingering and latent image that needs changing from 'He wears camo clothing, he must be a Michael Ryan-type' to 'That guy's probably ex-forces we're in for a bit of grief if we tackle his mob'
Cause if someone wants to try and steal or hurt you, they're gonna try, dpm or otherwise.



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 06:01 AM
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BTW if you do need to move around tactically and there is a clear and present danger of being detected as you bug out, consider these snippets about your kit.

Velco strips on pockets and pounches make one helluva noise as they are opened, if you need to move silently at night dont have velcro on your kit.

if you are bugging out through brush or scrub, dont have those silly dangly bits of thread or paracord fastened to your zippers, they always snag and make noise.

Dont wear air filled soled footwear, if it punctures as it often does the sound of repeated wet fart noises coming at 2 second intervals is a dead give away to your location.

If you have nice shiney bits of kit from knives to glasses, to compasess etc keep them out of sight, a trained soldier or cops eyes are easily attracted to anything glittery out in the boonies.

For the colonials in the US of A, if you are bugging out and thing you may end up in a gunfight, cock your weapon before you set off, not just before you are about to shoot, everyone knows the sound of a gun being cocked and its likely to bring down a hail of gunfire onto your position if you start pratting about cocking your weapon at the last second.

If you dress like a soldier or a paramil, dont expect to be treated as a civilian by anyone else you bump into, chance are if they spot you in wannabe mode they will shoot first.



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 06:05 AM
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Originally posted by WatchRider
NR I disagree on the whole dpm issue, a lot of my kit is ex-army, cause I was in the army and it was what I was issued with, ergo I don't see any reason to avoid this gear I've got due to colour specs. Maybe it's a US issue that has weeviled its way into the public imagination in the UK???
Incidentally I recall from my time in the forces the same paranoia about taking olive drab or dpm bergens home on leave. Because of a few one-off incidents it was seen as a terrorist threat!!
The whole, "Don't wear anything camoflage, green etc cause you'll make yourself a target" mentality isn't very helpful or entirely realistic. In fact I even would go as far to say we are encouraging a 'paranoid-complex' if we focus on dpm colour attraction dynamics.
If anything the same argument could go for a bright colour attracting the eye and standing out. Marking you as an easy touch.

What use is DPM in a city ?, I have DPM its ideal for when I'm out in the dales, but in a Sitx scenario Cammo kit will attract attention you dont need.

In fact it might actually discourage the idiots and opportunists out there from considering us a bunch of amateur ramblers to be honest.

We humble minded Brits seem to have this lingering and latent image that needs changing from 'He wears camo clothing, he must be a Michael Ryan-type' to 'That guy's probably ex-forces we're in for a bit of grief if we tackle his mob'
Cause if someone wants to try and steal or hurt you, they're gonna try, dpm or otherwise.



DPM is only of any use in the boonies, charcoal, drab, brown or plain civvy kit blends in much better in urban and coastal areas, DPM kit was designed primarily for use on the greater German plains, and experience showed that it was a bloody liability in Berlin. Its socially acceptable to wear DPM as a fashion statemment but if you are tryoing to get out of a city WTSHTF its only going to attract attention.

[edit on 16-10-2008 by Northern Raider]



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 08:25 AM
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I must admit, I am of the ''Dont wear DPM'' mindset. I do have a few DPM articles of clothing, but they are really for when TSHTF times.

I tend to wear Olive Greens, Tans, Stone and Russet colours, mostly non-military wear but Expedition/Safari type clothing, but always subdued neutral colours. When out and about, these colours dont attract attention and so what if people just think you are a 'rambler or hiker', it makes you a 'grey person' which is perfect in my opinion.

My backpack is Olive Green, but in one of the pockets is a DPM waterproof Cover that could be utilised if need be.

In normal times, I feel that there is nothing worse than a 40yo something running around the countryside looking like a 1980's John Rambo ...... but hey, thats just my opinion.



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 11:25 AM
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Thank you all for your posts. I tend to slide away from "tactical" gear and more along the lines of high quality civilian garb, however, will check out some of the items mentioned here.

Thank you all again.



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 11:35 AM
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Just wanted to mention thick, quilted bib overalls and rain gear for working outside (for those of you who are not bugging out) during the cold and wet seasons. I would advise a rain poncho as well as a rain suit (jacket and pants) that fits over your clothes. Plus mosquito netting for your head.



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 11:44 AM
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Berghaus,Regatta.polartec,fleece,goretex,

Keeping the materials light to carry and very 'Civvy'.

They're great for layering up.I'm a great believer in not having all your eggs in one basket,and having plenty layers keeps you covered for all occasions and there's always something available for washing/changing.

Getting work on the move is a whole lot easier if you don't smell like a wet cocker spaniel with no nose and particularly low self esteem.

A VERY good point was made in another thread.

Forget about looking like a sad,middle-aged Rambo with a beergut,You should be more worried about being mistaken for an 'official' by others on the move.



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 12:13 PM
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Well I'll stick to my style, I think its pretty decent and you can usually get it cheaper than civvy spec, which tends to be more expensive.
But look, I don't want to make a big beef about military gear vs civvy gear, If you're going with people who hate the military or dislike a right-wing stance then civvy all the way men lets dance

But I will say that Civilian and military can tell the difference between this:

Military:





And this:

Survivalist / Outdoorsman.



So how military style spec is an attractive option to the extent of being a target over civilian seems a moot point.
Ok enough barracking, lets get onto more cooler stuff



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 12:20 PM
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Originally posted by WatchRider

lets get onto more cooler stuff



Like that remote controlled tonka toy?.
Man where can I get me one of those?


I've only got one of those 'military type' items in my pack. a poncho.

Actually,since it's an Italian pattern camo..Does that mean I can only hide in Italian bushes?



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by Northern Raider
 
Yes, camo in regards to conditions is the point & should've been more specifically mentioned. Here in bush Alaska it is not uncommon to wear hunting appearal on a routine trip to the store though. If folks in other places started to adopt this trend now it couldn't hurt could it? I am plainmike; I've been a homeless person before, but never stood out as such...common sense is best & I still stand by what I mentioned in an earlier post on this thread...be prepared by keeping things in vehicles, @ work, etc.. If people ask questions it may be an opportunity to perhaps enlighten them, but who knows? I will now sign in although I'm using someone elses laptop.



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 02:43 PM
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Heh, I wondered if you'd mention the tonka toy


Used by the Engineers and search and rescue to scoot about and see whats around corners, in buildings etc.

Pretty neat dooky thing


I forget the real name

But now you've got me on the groove here's some nice images from NV kit I that is on everyones wish list







posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 03:02 PM
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I have always used polypro or capilene base layers throughout the years of camping and backpacking along various routes of the Appalachian Trail. However, after reading one of the responses regarding fire and the whole melting to the flesh thing, I think I will revert back to the basics for survival.

Silk Thermals, wool shirts, smartwool socks, Filson tin cloth outers etc. Remember, Cotton kills in extreme conditions. Cotton holds moisture and subsequently robs the body of heat.

For boots, check out several models from Scarpa or Danner. A good pair of rubber "Hunter" brand muck boots wouldn't hurt either.

Don't forget a good backpack.
I have a trusty Gregory but look for good deals on used Dana Design packs. They aren't made anymore under that name. But they are extremely durable packs. I think they fall under the Osprey brand nowadays.

Anyway, Keep is simple...



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 03:12 PM
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Originally posted by WatchRider
Used by the Engineers and search and rescue to scoot about and see whats around corners, in buildings etc.


Awww I can't believe they replaced the mirror on a stick.




I thought I'd add a link for anyone that doesn't know how many uses there are for a buff.
www.winwood-outdoor.co.uk...

I was regretting my latest choice of haircut in the wind today till I put this on.
Instant toasty. woohoo!



posted on Oct, 22 2008 @ 04:51 PM
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Merino wool is the danglies if you can afford a set or three. Cold weather kit par excellence. Get an Event jacket (fabric) - beats Gortex hands down and weighs next to nothing.
However, as stated above, get a poncho too. They are multi use, in general olive drab make excellent emergency shelters and camouflage.

Boots. Baffin. I got a pair for the winter, rated to -40. They worked wonders at -20 and thats the coldest I hope I ever have to go for a walk in. For summer, any boot really thats not killing your feet and offers good support.

Head cover / insect net. If you don't have one of these, do not expect to do any fishing throughout the summer. You will die of blood loss.


I could write a book, but that will do for now. remember, go through your kit, and think 'does this have more than one use?'. If not, why is it there? if it has a good reason, keep it. If not, chuck it and buy some thing that can be used in more than one role.



posted on Oct, 22 2008 @ 09:41 PM
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Originally posted by Northern Raider

For the colonials in the US of A, if you are bugging out and thing you may end up in a gunfight, cock your weapon before you set off, not just before you are about to shoot, everyone knows the sound of a gun being cocked and its likely to bring down a hail of gunfire onto your position if you start pratting about cocking your weapon at the last second.

1911 is cocked and locked when I go out the door.

If you dress like a soldier or a paramil, dont expect to be treated as a civilian by anyone else you bump into, chance are if they spot you in wannabe mode they will shoot first.

If things go south in a big way some one wearing cammies is not going to go down well with me. If they have an AK47 or some other spray and pray weapon in their hand it is going prompt a less than friendly response.



,

Danner boots, surplus heavy wool pants.

NR I like the way you think, you have your stuff in one sock and wired tight.



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