It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Unrepentant -Canada's Secret Religious Genocide

page: 2
16
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 03:35 PM
link   
"Where they mistreated years ago?
Yes..I believe so.
Now...not at all."

How do you explain this story then?

www.cbc.ca...

Yeah, I know, it was a big misunderstanding by a compassionate Government. Sorry, but if anyone tells you the First Nations are still not currently being mistreated, they are either delusional or lying through their teeth.




posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 05:02 PM
link   
I seriously hope that at least a few people, like myself, will take the time to view the entire video.

It's disturbing, yes, and it's not news to me, but, more than anything, this defrocked minister needs to be heard out.

I first heard about what was going on in the residential schools during the early seventies up in the Northwest Territories. I hardly believed what I'd learned from the young Dene people who told me about it. Over the decades that followed, I'd learn a bit more here and there, from people who didn't really want to talk about it.

It's still that way today. Nothing is resolved, especially when money is thrown at it to make it go away. The silence is deafening. I suspect this movie will disappear very soon.



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 11:05 AM
link   

Originally posted by karl 12

You do need a strong stomach for this one but it clearly shows the brutal supression and murder of young Native Americans under the delusional guise of religious bigotry and ignorance.

[edit on 02/10/08 by karl 12]


I find it ironic how when I talked about racists killing and oppression on blacks in another post you star, agree and defend the peoples posts attacking me saying "everyone was racist at sometime, so who cares what happened to blacks".
Indirectly supporting and defending racism.

And then you post this movie which is based on racist whites killing Natives.

I'll be waiting for an answer because I'd really like to know what your thinking defending those posts then posting something like this.

Here is a reminder oh your post: www.abovetopsecret.com...

[edit on 7-10-2009 by buds84]



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 11:46 AM
link   
reply to post by PuRe EnErGy
 


Pure energy, Why don't you stay on topic and save your politically brainwashed opinion for another day?

You do not speak for all Canadians (thank God!) And you insult the clear thinking folks who actually want to discuss issues instead of name call.

MODS: Sure is getting easy to spot the single minded intollerant on ATS.



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 11:58 AM
link   

Originally posted by AccessDenied
Here in Canada, they are called First Nations people, or Anishnaabe.
"Nish" for short.


Mmmm...not quite right. Anishnaabe refers to the Algonkian-speaking peoples like the Council of the Three Fires...Ojibwa, Odawa and Potowatami.

You also have the Iroquoian-speaking folks and...I'm told...their language is as different from Algonkian as English is from Chinese.

So, depending who you talk to...First Nations, Aboriginals, or just plain Indians. As I always say...the key is respect.



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 12:35 PM
link   
reply to post by buds84
 


Anyone who reads through that thread will quite clearly see where you are coming from.

I applauded the post due to the fact that the comments in it happened to be true - if it doesn't fit with your twisted agenda then I couldn't care less my friend.



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 01:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by karl 12
reply to post by buds84
 


Anyone who reads through that thread will quite clearly see where you are coming from.

I applauded the post due to the fact that the comments in it happened to be true - if it doesn't fit with your twisted agenda then I couldn't care less my friend.



Oh this isn't hypocritical at all.

You are clearly doing the same thing here.

Why post this movie when this type of thing has happened in the past to all cultures? The killing and wiping out of nations and races is common with the old racists. So who cares right?... oh thats right my agenda of pointing out racists is twisted yet yours doing the exact same thing is is perfectly fine.

Not in the same boat all at....shame



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 01:21 PM
link   
reply to post by buds84
 


The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



Darned if it doesn't seem like you are trying to change the subject from the contents of the film to the author of the thread.

This film is important and needs to be discussed. Have you watched it yet?


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 02:06 PM
link   
reply to post by masqua
 


I watched this film 3 years ago and wasn't shocked at all, really didn't expect any less from the invaders because they do this all around the world.

I have a Native friend here in Toronto, he is from up North Thunder bay and I have herd much worse horror stories.

I personally think these people should abandon the "Catholic" church seeing it was forced upon them the very same way it was forced upon the Africans.

"Roman Catholic" Why listen to the story from the guys that tried to and killed Jesus(Yesawa)?
Thats rather one sided and those dirt bags changed the bible to their favor.

I am born Catholic myself but I have my own path.

[edit on 7-10-2009 by buds84]



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 02:13 PM
link   
Reply to post by ACCESSDENIED


Originally posted by AccessDenied

While there are some stuck on reserves that live in poverty, there are many that live the high life.

I also live in canada, am married to a metis woman and am friends with many Aboriginal people. I think that you have your terms reversed and have missed a category. There are SOME who live the high life, there are many who live the middle class, however the majority are living at or near poverty, both on the reserve and in the city.



Natives that come off the reserve, to go to college or university, completely government paid for, as well as housing and living expenses, paid for.
They come in new vehicles, buy new furniture, and dress in the latest fashions.
Their children have all the most expensive toys.

this really depends dramatically on where in the country you are. Some Native Bands have negotiated their treaties favourably, many have not. Some have developed a solid business community, many have not. Some have developed large conglomerate corporations that are rife with corruption, most have not.



They walk into any store, and pay no tax on anything.

this is a complete untruth. Native people pay all kinds of taxes on all kinds of things, there are a very few taxes, like some sales taxes, that some Native people are exempt from, and very often, depending on the treaty, this is only the case on reserve



They stay here till their courses are done, then go back to the reserve either well educated enough for a good job, or back to the home built for them by the band council, no charge, with monies earned from the Native run Casino just south of me.

It is a positive thing that young Aboriginal people are finally becoming able to engage positively in their (the greater) communities.



Where they mistreated years ago?
Yes..I believe so.
Now...not at all.

Do not be obtuse. The last residential school in Canada closed in 1990. Thousands of Native people over the past hundred years were ripped from their homes and placed into "re-education camps", many were physically and sexually abused in horrific fashion, most had their "old-ways" stripped from them by the Church and the State and if you think that the effects of this...psychological problems, widespread substance abuse, and many more have not been felt by subsequent generations then you are grossly misled.


As for religion, I have seen very few keep up with the "OLD WAYS" unless there is a special occasion or a POW WOW.

My god, it was the official policy of the Canadian Government and the Catholic church to weed out traditional Aboriginal spirituality and the "OLD WAYS" for decades! Do you feel compassion for the thousands of Japanese immigrants that were interned in Canada during the second world war? Did you feel ashamed of our country for THAT? Did you think that it was horrific that there was a holocaust in Europe, that there was a Genocide in Rwanda? That the South African system of apartheid was conceived only after South African officials had done a tour of the Canadian Reserve system?

wow. 2010 here we come.

[edit on 7-10-2009 by Tamale_214]



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 02:38 PM
link   
reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 

So true, and also the Cree speakers of the Plains Indians. Aboriginal culture was and is diverse.



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 02:43 PM
link   

Originally posted by buds84

I watched this film 3 years ago and wasn't shocked at all, really didn't expect any less from the invaders because they do this all around the world.


Agreed... at the time, it was Standard Operating Procedure, as Kevin Annett pointed out at the start of the film. During those days, racialism was in it's heyday (1700's - 1800's) and the original inhabitants (casually called savages or whatever disparaging description fit the country at hand) were disposable.


I personally think these people should abandon the "Catholic" church seeing it was forced upon them the very same way it was forced upon the Africans.

I am born Catholic myself but I have my own path.



John Calvin indoctrinated here, and I would never argue with you on the injustices of the various sects and churches. I DO have a soft spot in my heart for the words spoken on the Mount... but that's maybe another thread.

About that, though, I guess you know that Kevin Annett was a United Church of Canada minister and not Catholic... so the entire movie is about that church and the various government offices that worked hand in hand over the past century and a half.

Here's some excerps and links from both sides of the story:

Former United Church minister makes abuse claims

United Church Response to Kevin Annett’s Letter of Demand


An ex-United Church minister has found evidence that principals of the church-run residential schools were made legal guardians of Native children in the 1940s. "As employees of the church the principals were legally liable for the welfare of all Native students, as was the United Church," said Kevin Annett. Annett's former church, St. Andrew's in Port Alberni, has issued an apology for residential school abuses.

www.hartford-hwp.com...



Kevin Annett has made a number of statements about the United Church and its role in the Indian Residential School system for over 14 years. Weaving together half-truths, conspiracy theories, misinformation, and his own unresolved issues with the church, Mr. Annett makes claims that mislead the public and do a disservice to survivors. Here are some examples:

www.united-church.ca...


B.C. family to sue United Church over alleged residential-school murder

For rense fans

The movie may have been made in 2006, but the fall-out is still rolling across the Canadian landscape.

[edit on 7/10/09 by masqua]



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 07:31 PM
link   

Originally posted by masqua


The movie may have been made in 2006, but the fall-out is still rolling across the Canadian landscape.

Is it ever. I have several friends and family who have worked in the field of the residential schools lawsuits and the currently ongoing Indian Residential Schools Resolution Secretariat. The frequency and range of abuse is absolutely astounding, and as I've said in a previous post, it didn't happen that long ago with the last school closing in 1996 in my home province link. No question this is a very ugly black spot on the face of my fair country.

S&F



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 08:48 PM
link   
Here is what Kevin Annett stands for and how he resolves the conflict he has caused within himself and to those who he sees that are in need:

( bolding mine)


Beatitudes

Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are the gentle, for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied.

Blessed are the merciful, for they shall receive mercy.

Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.

Blessed are those who have been persecuted for the sake of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are you when people insult you and persecute you, and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of Me.


Rejoice and be glad, for your reward in heaven is great; for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you.

www.lifeofchrist.com...



I follow no specific religious path and attend no church, but Kevin Annett is a man I can admire. I would listen to what he has to say and know I'd not be disappointed by his beliefs.

If only the words spoken on the mount were the true heart of the church today, I would perhaps even support them, but I'll keep my prayers private, never wear the badge of ANY sect nor join a 'flock'. That's because I also understand one other thing said on the mount:



When you pray, you are not to be like the hypocrites; for they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and on the street corners so that they may be seen by men. Truly I say to you, they have their reward in full.
But you, when you pray, go into your inner room, close your door and pray to your Father who is in secret, and your Father who sees what is done in secret will reward you.

www.lifeofchrist.com...


Can the injustices of the past be forgiven? YES! But first the admission of guilt has to be made. Throwing thousands of dollars at survivors does nothing at all.




Prime Minister Stephen Harper's statement of apology

(excerp)

Therefore, on behalf of the government of Canada and all Canadians, I stand before you, in this chamber so central to our life as a country, to apologize to aboriginal peoples for Canada's role in the Indian residential schools system.

To the approximately 80,000 living former students, and all family members and communities, the government of Canada now recognizes that it was wrong to forcibly remove children from their homes and we apologize for having done this.

We now recognize that it was wrong to separate children from rich and vibrant cultures and traditions, that it created a void in many lives and communities, and we apologize for having done this.

We now recognize that, in separating children from their families, we undermined the ability of many to adequately parent their own children and sowed the seeds for generations to follow, and we apologize for having done this.

We now recognize that, far too often, these institutions gave rise to abuse or neglect and were inadequately controlled, and we apologize for failing to protect you.

Not only did you suffer these abuses as children, but as you became parents, you were powerless to protect your own children from suffering the same experience, and for this we are sorry.

The burden of this experience has been on your shoulders for far too long.

The burden is properly ours as a government, and as a country.

There is no place in Canada for the attitudes that inspired the Indian residential schools system to ever again prevail.

You have been working on recovering from this experience for a long time and in a very real sense, we are now joining you on this journey.

The government of Canada sincerely apologizes and asks the forgiveness of the aboriginal peoples of this country for failing them so profoundly.

We are sorry.

In moving towards healing, reconciliation and resolution of the sad legacy of Indian residential schools, implementation of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement agreement began on September 19, 2007.

Years of work by survivors, communities, and aboriginal organizations culminated in an agreement that gives us a new beginning and an opportunity to move forward together in partnership.

A cornerstone of the settlement agreement is the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

This commission presents a unique opportunity to educate all Canadians on the Indian residential schools system.

It will be a positive step in forging a new relationship between aboriginal peoples and other Canadians, a relationship based on the knowledge of our shared history, a respect for each other and a desire to move forward together with a renewed understanding that strong families, strong communities and vibrant cultures and traditions will contribute to a stronger Canada for all of us.

www.cbc.ca...


Is it over?

No!

Waiting silently in the wings are the RCMP, the many churches which ran the schools, the 'disappeared' bodies of the children and, last but not least, those who aided and abetted within the communities themselves.



[edit on 7/10/09 by masqua]



posted on Oct, 27 2009 @ 05:53 PM
link   
just been to talk by this guy,
hidden history



posted on Nov, 10 2009 @ 09:01 AM
link   
The pioneering spirit of history was so well hidden for so long .

I used to live in a remote coastal desert community in Australia

and 150 years ago their solution for the Aborigines was to herd

them all over a 200 ft cliff .!



there are NO aborigines within 250 miles anymore , they now live

in degraded squalor as forgotten prisoners on a reserve !



posted on Nov, 25 2009 @ 11:31 AM
link   

Originally posted by radarloveguy


The pioneering spirit of history was so well hidden for so long .

I used to live in a remote coastal desert community in Australia

and 150 years ago their solution for the Aborigines was to herd

them all over a 200 ft cliff .!



there are NO aborigines within 250 miles anymore , they now live

in degraded squalor as forgotten prisoners on a reserve !



that is awful, its time people became very aware of what exactly has gone on and is still going on, they apparatnly have been testing the swine flu vac on the native indians in canada they have no choice............



posted on Nov, 25 2009 @ 11:31 AM
link   

Originally posted by radarloveguy


The pioneering spirit of history was so well hidden for so long .

I used to live in a remote coastal desert community in Australia

and 150 years ago their solution for the Aborigines was to herd

them all over a 200 ft cliff .!



there are NO aborigines within 250 miles anymore , they now live

in degraded squalor as forgotten prisoners on a reserve !



that is awful, its time people became very aware of what exactly has gone on and is still going on, they apparatnly have been testing the swine flu vac on the native indians in canada they have no choice............



posted on Nov, 25 2009 @ 12:55 PM
link   
This is not the "fault" of Canadians. Therefore, "we" do not need to "correct" it.

The fact is that a goodly chunk of the non-Native's who have been here for more than 100 years, did not come here because they were looking to move.

They were sent here. The system that was used on the natives was imported from Ireland, where it was perfected in all of its nastiness.

Then they imported the children from Ireland and England that were in that system to come here too.

Is there groups at fault? You bet.

The Canadian government has surely done some truly bad stuff.

But the original blame, it goes to the same group that has been screwing all of us.

The government of today is the government OF THE PEOPLE. Not of some monied power class. We are being asked, over and over, to repent for the sins of others. Not even just the sins of our ancestors. We are being asked consistently to repent and fix the sins of the people who also screwed our ancestors. And we continue to try and fix that which others wrought, on us all.

Think about it. Somebody abueses your parents, makes what they are illegal, sends them to another place across the world, where many people die on the way. When they get here they have you. The people here also got screwed over by the same people who abused your parents. You become a taxpayer. Then somehow you are told that YOU need to apologize for what the people who abused your parents did to other people.

What a GREAT system.

[edit on 2009/11/25 by Aeons]



posted on Nov, 25 2009 @ 01:03 PM
link   
Those nasty "RCMP" were the the Northwest Mounted Police originally.

Some of the first people of European ancestry that were actual representatives of a GOVERNMENT, or a people, and not a corporation. Which is what the furriers, foxers, and the people working for the Hudson Bay Company were.

Canada was not a nation. Canada was a CORPORATION.

The NWMP were not all these bad men looking to make trouble.

Many of them honoured the cultures they found here. Many of them took wives from amoungst the local populace. They had their wives pictures taken. In their native dress.

This was a sign of RESPECT. If the women in your family were photographed at this time, particulaly in the New World it was expensive. What is in the photograph MEANS something. A woman holding a scroll or a book is saying, I read, I am educated, my family values educated women. A NWMP having is wife photographed, and shown in her native dress is saying something about respecting her and her culture.

Has there been much in the way of problems? You bet. But realize, that when those who were not just the money making corporate and religious sociopaths got here, they have tried to be respectful even if they didn't always get it right.



new topics

top topics



 
16
<< 1   >>

log in

join