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Are You Stocked Up Yet? Time Is Running Out

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posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 06:33 PM
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Folks this is REAL, not fear mongering. Shipping disruptions are in the MSM.

Please take the time to read the following stories. It's no longer tinfoil, it's #ing real!!!

Grain piles up in ports Canada next in inability to finance shipments

Dry Bulk Bulker rates fall amid trade credit fears

Shipping Lines Say Tight Credit Cutting World Trade

Economic slump may push shipping lines into bankruptcy, says investor

Most stores only have 3 DAYS worth of stock. Yes, warehouses right now, still have inventory, but if new stock doesn't come by way of shipping lines, it will run out.

Please be sure to have enough food, water, necessities for hygiene - and LEAD. If it takes these idiot politicians, who have not been able to fix the problem yet, much longer. We will start seeing supplies issues within two weeks. Even if they get things fixed in 2 weeks, we could easily have supply shortages for another 2 weeks after the problem is fixed, because once the supply line stops, it takes 2 weeks for it to start up again.

This is no longer fantasy. This is reality.

Edit to fix bad link

[edit on 10/15/08 by redhatty]

[edit on 10/15/08 by redhatty]




posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 06:57 PM
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If you go to the stores and there is nothing on the shelves, you've waited too long.

Even if there is a temporary supply problem, it is better to be prepared than to be hungry.

It's not hard to buy a little extra every time you go to the store.



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 06:59 PM
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I work at a restaurant and a week ago I ordered a 50 pound bag of rice...just in case



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:01 PM
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yikes, im scared. i will be going to the store tomorrow and buying lots of canned fruits



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:02 PM
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Stocking up is good, but it would also help to learn what plants and animals are edible in your particular location. Anybody got some useful links for that info?



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:13 PM
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Originally posted by psycospyder
I work at a restaurant and a week ago I ordered a 50 pound bag of rice...just in case


Get a 50# of flour, too, while the prices are cheap. Learn to make bread if you don't already know how. You'll be glad to have that knowledge.



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:17 PM
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I've been stocking food supplies away for several weeks now. I'd say I'm up to four months of survival, and two months of eating well. I'm relying on the news and my gut to say how much more I will hoard.

I am taking this situation very seriously.



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:22 PM
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reply to post by redhatty
 

Dandilion leaves are edible and they are everywhere buy a cross bow ,a sling shot for hunting ,and a fishing pole.

Rice and beans are a complete protein; buy the dry beans. They are still pretty cheap.


+8 more 
posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:22 PM
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I heard this before when the truckers across America went on strike.
There is money in trade, in shipping, in everything involved, and where there is money to be made...someone is going to make it. Where are the gas lines we were suppose to have? The $10 gallon gas?
Life goes on with its hills of prosperity and valleys of adjustments.

I personally welcome some adversity because it is during these times that we finally realize that we are a community and need each other. (remember the first couple of days after 9/11?)

When we don't have problems to solve we go our seperate selfish ways,
we weren't created to live like that, but we haven't learned that yet have we?
To those of you that ask the question; "why is it that if your God is all loving that he allows such tragedy to happen in the world"? There is your answer. It brings us together.
But I guess you could be right, we could certainly choose to be nothing more than scavengers willing to go all survival of the strong, and create a self fullfilling prophecy. Run to the stores and greedily buy up everything "you" need. Hey, if we got a couple hundred people together we could make a run on a grocery store and leave nothing behind but a couple of Cosmopolitan magazines. Then people would spread the word and soon grocery stores everywhere would have people buying them out.

....Its not good enough to use the excuse that you need enough food to last "x" amount of days until this "phantom" shipping crisis is over. You want to horde to the exclusion of others. Your survival is more important than anyone elses. I have no moral issue with that because it is up to the individual how they want to "evolve" or "de-evolve" I just have no interest in living like a cave man with the rest of you, so I have no interest in gearing up for "survivor".

You may share my MRE's if you are hungry.



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by tmbandt
 


Yes we have to but we live off cash and with a family of 5 it is very hard to stock up AND keep food on the table.
Right now realistically we have enough stock for maybe a month, I would like to have a six month supply for a family of 5 but the cash runs thin.

OP, thanks for the heads up looks like we will need to do some extra budgeting to get our stock levels higher.



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:30 PM
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reply to post by Res Ipsa
 

Survival of the fittest man. That's life. I'm gonna help all the folks I can if needed. Keeping my family alive is the most important thing to me though.



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:30 PM
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I have over 50 cases of water and about 200 cans of green giant corn stockpiled in my basement. My fishing rod and rifle will also be on hand if need be.

People think I'm crazy when I tell them to start a canned food collection, but I don't really care.



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:32 PM
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Thanks for the heads up. I just took some notes on the flour and dried beans. I think everyone should contribute something to this thread. We need to give each other tips on what we need to stock up on. Make sure every one knows what they need. I just ordered a lot of vitamins. I have 2 bottles here already, but if push came to shove and we ran out of food vitamins would come in handy BIG TIME. Starred and Flagged



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by Res Ipsa
 

Mormons are required to keep a years supply of food. Somehow there are no shortages because of the Mormons. Buying food staples like beans rice and oatmeal is just sensible. They are nutritious and they last for ever. They are also cheap; people will need to cut corners on expenses for awhile. Not taking care of oneself or ones family is not a sign of altruism ;it is a sign of mental illness. I am sure you are take good care of yourself. Peace.


+7 more 
posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:33 PM
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Yes, well stocked and have been for a while.

A couple of suggestions:

1) Mark the purchase date on your goods with a permanent marker. Always try to move the new purchases to the back and use the older stuff first. Rotation.

2) If you live in a relatively warm climate, grains, flour, dried pasta will develop flour wevils. They don't "find" your goods, their eggs are shipped with the goods. It's a by-product of manufacture and milling. Worry not, the eggs -- and the adult bugs, for that matter -- are just miniscule protein. However, wevils running rampant throughout your flour can foul it. To stop this process, freeze these goods for at least 24-hours, then seal them in a ziplock or other positive seal container. It'll never be a problem after that.

3) We rarely think of herbs and spices as survival goods, but ask anyone who has eaten the same dish over and over again, and they will tell you that spices matter. Plus they keep for a long time.

4) Unless you live by the sea or in northern Utah and have mastered the art of salt manufacture, salt is going to make a significant difference. Places of high humidity will cause the salt to clump, and the paper container to degrade. Ziplock.

5) Please don't forget water considerations, especially with dried goods. If you are -- for some reason -- unable to count on a water source, you might be better purchasing canned goods. Include water filtration, steralization, and storage into your scheme of things. You can live for weeks without food, mere days without water.

6) Sun-dried tomatoes, as well as other dried fruits (and nuts) are an excellent pound-for-pound source of nutrition, as well as being a good additive to your dried rice/beans.

7) Learn to can (actually bottle..... why is it called canning?) You can preserve meats, butter, cheese.... nearly everything, and once the jars, lids, rings, equipment are purchased, you'll be able to customize your favorite meals. Bottled MREs that actually have flavor.

8) Make or buy a tortilla press. Tortillas -- corn, wheat, coconut flour, almond flour -- keep longer than bread, and are very efficient at filling your belly, as well as being an on-the-go grain source, and a handy container to put your other goodies into for a one-pot dinner.

9) In an absence of regular supplies, vitamin C becomes critical. There's a myriad of ways to supply this. There is a product that we keep on hand, even though we have two lime trees and one orange tree: It's called True Lime, and has several tiny little packets of lime powder.

Good thread..... there's really no reason in my view to NOT stock up. Do it gradually and it doesn't hurt the pocketbook so much. Prices are probably not going to go down, so the worst case is you save some money.



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:34 PM
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This is an important thread.. people need to be prepared for "anything" As I said in another thread I have about 1.5 years worth of dry goods, this winter I am going to buy seed seal and deep freeze it. I have a 14 year old daughter that I could not bear to watch starve to death because of the eventual system collapse. I posted this in another thread some of you may have read this but if not take a look..

www.worldnetdaily.com...



Sailor



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:37 PM
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Originally posted by argentus
2) If you live in a relatively warm climate, grains, flour, dried pasta will develop flour wevils. They don't "find" your goods, their eggs are shipped with the goods. It's a by-product of manufacture and milling. Worry not, the eggs -- and the adult bugs, for that matter -- are just miniscule protein. However, wevils running rampant throughout your flour can foul it. To stop this process, freeze these goods for at least 24-hours, then seal them in a ziplock or other positive seal container. It'll never be a problem after that.

Simply adding a couple of bay (laurel) leaves to it will keep the wevils away too


3) We rarely think of herbs and spices as survival goods, but ask anyone who has eaten the same dish over and over again, and they will tell you that spices matter. Plus they keep for a long time.

Not just taste, but herb and spices are essential to health. "Old time" remedies almost always include herbs and spices. Keep a good stock of these essential items.



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by argentus
 


Thanks Argentus
You made a lot of very good points. I wrote them down on my list with the other things.



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by argentus
 

This is outstanding info. I wish it were as easy to add someone to friends list as it is to ignore them.

Great post friend!!



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 07:44 PM
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Originally posted by argentus
4) Unless you live by the sea or in northern Utah and have mastered the art of salt manufacture, salt is going to make a significant difference. Places of high humidity will cause the salt to clump, and the paper container to degrade. Ziplock.

7) Learn to can (actually bottle..... why is it called canning?) You can preserve meats, butter, cheese.... nearly everything, and once the jars, lids, rings, equipment are purchased, you'll be able to customize your favorite meals. Bottled MREs that actually have flavor.


Throw a few kernels of unpopped popcorn in with your stored salt. It will help "agitate" the salt anytime the bag is moved around, preventing or lessening clumpage.

Canning is an excellent piece of advice. I just made and put up 5 quarts of apple butter Monday/Tuesday.





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