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List of security clearances

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posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 04:25 AM
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www.dtic.mil...

This link has good information also. This is the DoD Personnel Security Program PDF.

Mr. M




posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 05:12 AM
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Can you give me the link to the .exe of the program instead of the .pdf



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 07:51 AM
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" A chef on the boat has no clearance, but the guy working in Command and Control has a Top Secret. "

Not necessarily so. In some military units the cooks and MPs have clearances. Because the people around them might discuss something classified.

These cooks and MPs are people who didn't make it through the training to do the technical work, but have their clearance.

As a rule, bitter people.

Some people get a clearance, but never see a classified document. They have a clearance because they are around classified material, not because they handle it.



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 08:07 AM
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Originally posted by StarChild
This is the FULL list in it's entirety. However, some clearances are classified in themselves, and are created solely for certain projects, and designated as such. These types of clearances expire with the completion of the project or experiment. For example, the clearance to access a certain computer program may just be limited to 3 people in the world, therefore the need for specific clearances is imperative. A password and username would be delegated, and clearance set (codenamed). Upon expiration of the project, the clearance would be void.

These clearances listed below are "set" clearances.


1C or 2C - Federal
....
Yankee White


That's is all of them. There's a lot of them, huh?



Mr. M


StarC, You get my WATS vote for your list.
Yankee White is the highest, and required to
"carry the football"
S.




posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 08:32 AM
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Originally posted by StarChild
This is the FULL list in it's entirety. However, some clearances are classified in themselves, and are created solely for certain projects, and designated as such. These types of clearances expire with the completion of the project or experiment. For example, the clearance to access a certain computer program may just be limited to 3 people in the world, therefore the need for specific clearances is imperative. A password and username would be delegated, and clearance set (codenamed). Upon expiration of the project, the clearance would be void.
Mr. M


You forgot ULTRA, MAGICK, and ULTRA-MAGICK...



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 08:59 AM
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you guys never included the (un)official "Area 51" FAA clearance. about five or six years ago someone at an aviation conference made up about 500 of these pictureless id cards. they look incredibly official, had air force, dept. of defense, nasa, area 51 insignia, and other things on them. the receivers were from all over the country, so they got spread out after the conference... needless to say, pre-911 you could flash this to a guard at any airport and he would just assume it was real. i'm dead serious about this... mine's in a drawer somewhere at home. when i get back tonight i'll dig it up, and scan it in for all to see.



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 09:09 AM
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You can apply for security clearances, therefore they aren't confidential (there is info on the DoD website and DoS and such..). It seems as if you don't even need to be in the military to get one? Just a good background and a 'job' that needs the clearance.

Also, thanks StarChild for the COMPLETE list
I searched for a good half hour last night trying to find them and never did.

[Edited on 26-3-2004 by pyxsul]



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 09:47 AM
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As a civilian, you must either be an employee of the government, a consultant for the government, or an employee of a government cleared contractor in order to obtain a security clearance. Also, it is highly likely that you application for a security clearance would be tossed in the circular file unless your application was cross-referenced to a government contract with an associated DD-254.

There are some people, usually ex-government big wigs, leaders in the scientific community, and other priviledged persons who can retain their security clearances after they finish working for the government, but it is pretty rare.



posted on Mar, 27 2004 @ 10:05 AM
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"There are some people, usually ex-government big wigs, leaders in the scientific community, and other priviledged persons who can retain their security clearances after they finish working for the government, but it is pretty rare."

They keep it "alive" but suspended. Frightfully expensive to clear a person, and people who work at secure facilities tend to get jobs at other secure facilities if the first job goes away. The ones that retire come back as consultants.



posted on Mar, 27 2004 @ 12:34 PM
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If some projects are so top secret that only a few people know about them how do they keep track of all of them so that they can be used, and so that other people can join the project???



posted on Mar, 29 2004 @ 07:57 AM
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If you are referring to Special Access Programs (SAPs), there is a joint committee at the Pentagon called the Special Access Program Operations Council, or SAPOC.

SAPOC is in charge of approving, overseeing and coordinating SAP activities and projects to ensure that the technologies are shared between users who may need them, and also to ensure that the same technology isn't duplicated by different agencies.



posted on Mar, 29 2004 @ 08:07 AM
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StarC, You get my WATS vote for your list.
Yankee White is the highest, and required to
"carry the football"
S.



Thanks a lot. I appreciate it.


Mr. M



posted on Mar, 29 2004 @ 08:10 AM
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You forgot ULTRA, MAGICK, and ULTRA-MAGICK...

As far as those types of clearances go, there is an enormous listing for clearances which are specifically related to certain operations or experiments. This list is not obtainable in it's entirety, and is impossible to maintain accurately. So, sorry about not posting those types of clearances. The only ones you should be concerned with are the "set" clearances anyway, because these are the "gateway" to the others.

Mr. M



posted on Mar, 29 2004 @ 08:11 AM
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Originally posted by pyxsul
You can apply for security clearances, therefore they aren't confidential (there is info on the DoD website and DoS and such..). It seems as if you don't even need to be in the military to get one? Just a good background and a 'job' that needs the clearance.

Also, thanks StarChild for the COMPLETE list
I searched for a good half hour last night trying to find them and never did.

[Edited on 26-3-2004 by pyxsul]


You just have to know where to look, that's all.


Mr. M



posted on Mar, 29 2004 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by Researcher
" A chef on the boat has no clearance, but the guy working in Command and Control has a Top Secret. "

Not necessarily so. In some military units the cooks and MPs have clearances. Because the people around them might discuss something classified.

These cooks and MPs are people who didn't make it through the training to do the technical work, but have their clearance.

As a rule, bitter people.

Some people get a clearance, but never see a classified document. They have a clearance because they are around classified material, not because they handle it.


Dude, I was in the Navy. I know this stuff. Everyone in the military has a general clearance, which is stated in their orders ("Upon certification of security clearances, member is granted access to classified information."). Everyone's orders say this. However, a "chef" does not have a specific security clearance, because their job does not require such. An electronics technician has a clearance because they deal with equipment that is sensitive in nature, and must be controlled. Do you understand now?


Mr. M



posted on Mar, 29 2004 @ 01:51 PM
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Dude, I was in the Army, and in the Army unit I was in, mess hall personell and military police had security clearances. They were people who flunked out of the tech schools. Every member of the outfit had Top Secret with Access to Special Intelligence.



posted on Mar, 29 2004 @ 04:01 PM
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Originally posted by pyxsul
You can apply for security clearances, therefore they aren't confidential (there is info on the DoD website and DoS and such..). It seems as if you don't even need to be in the military to get one? Just a good background and a 'job' that needs the clearance.
[Edited on 26-3-2004 by pyxsul]


Are you seeking a job that requires a security clearance? I find it odd that you would want to know all of the names or levels. It's pointless, and you would be told what level you needed if it was necessary.

I think you are confused about the "levels". Everything is compartmentalized. You might be able to access a nuclear weapons area, but also be restricted from the snack bar in an airplane maintenance area. (Just trust me on this one.) Have you ever heard of "need to know"? That's basically how everything works. If you have a valid need then you get the specific clearance for that job. The president probably has no idea a nuclear missile works. He doesn't have the need. And a nuclear scientist doesn't know how to launch the missile. So havving Top Secret clearance doesn't mean anything. It's basically just a standard of background investigation. How far do they research your history?



posted on Mar, 29 2004 @ 04:13 PM
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No, I'm not applying for one. I was going to make a better list but StarChild did it for me


Edit: No idea about how far, probably your whole life
www.state.gov... has some questions and answers.

[Edited on 29-3-2004 by pyxsul]



posted on Mar, 30 2004 @ 02:55 AM
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Originally posted by Researcher
Dude, I was in the Army, and in the Army unit I was in, mess hall personell and military police had security clearances. They were people who flunked out of the tech schools. Every member of the outfit had Top Secret with Access to Special Intelligence.


OK...so you're unit was highly specialized. That REQUIRES a clearance. This is exactly what I was trying to say earlier. If you have the "need to know", then you are "good to go".


In general, though, don't tell me that a mess cook get's TS-SAP just because... 'cause they don't.

However, if you're a cook on a sub, then yeah, you get a Secret. Keep in mind, though, that the cook on a sub doesn't have access to all Secret info, only what is required to complete his job and day to day operations, nothing else.




Mr. M

[Edited on 30-3-2004 by StarChild]



posted on Mar, 30 2004 @ 04:21 AM
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www.dss.mil...

This pretty much sums it all up for you.

Mr. M



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