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List of security clearances

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posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:28 AM
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Originally posted by ilovepizza
Is there a list with them in order from top clearence to lowest level clearence?


Nope.

Mr. M




posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:29 AM
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No idea - he is civilian though

That doesn't tell me much. What field did he work in? Engineering, Electronics, Computers, Weapons, Aircraft?

Mr. M



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:31 AM
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Yes I understand it better, but not fully. What does SCI, TK, G, HCS-P, and other such letter actualy stand for. They must be an abriviation for some word.

"For example, me and you could both have a Top Secret-Crypto SCI / TK / G / HCS-P clearance"

Me ever have clearence



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:33 AM
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Originally posted by ilovepizza
Yes I understand it better, but not fully. What does SCI, TK, G, HCS-P, and other such letter actualy stand for. They must be an abriviation for some word.

"For example, me and you could both have a Top Secret-Crypto SCI / TK / G / HCS-P clearance"

Me ever have clearence


With the way you spell, you are probably right. No clearance for you buddy!
Just kidding, man. You could get one easily, if your job requires it. Just as long as you have a clean record, and are financially stable, you can get just about any clearance out there, unless you give "them" a reason to think otherwise.

Mr. M



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:34 AM
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Here is something that has to do with classification stuff. document



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:36 AM
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sorry - i didnt finish my post

No idea - he is civilian though. I know that he was allowed acces to preatty much everything. He was allowed where ever the nukes are fired from and where the ship is conroled. Sorry about my lack of technical terms - my interest is more in airplanes.



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:37 AM
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As far as what the abbreviations stand for, I can tell you a few.

SSBI = Single Scope Background Investigation
SCI = Special Compartmented Information
CI = Compartmented Information
SBI = Special Background Investigation


Mr. M



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:37 AM
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How would I go about getting clearence. I do not want to spend a long time getting the clearence. I want fast results



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:38 AM
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Originally posted by American Mad Man
sorry - i didnt finish my post

No idea - he is civilian though. I know that he was allowed acces to preatty much everything. He was allowed where ever the nukes are fired from and where the ship is conroled. Sorry about my lack of technical terms - my interest is more in airplanes.


I couldn't even tell you without knowing exactly what he did. Sorry man.

Mr. M



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:39 AM
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it's cool - thanks for trying



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:39 AM
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Originally posted by ilovepizza
How would I go about getting clearence. I do not want to spend a long time getting the clearence. I want fast results




Dude, you are seriously smoking something if you think you can just "apply" for a clearance. "Need to know" is what it is based on. Didn't we go over this before?


Mr. M



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:40 AM
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Originally posted by American Mad Man
it's cool - thanks for trying


No problem. Ask him sometime, and if he gives you a job description, let me know, and I'll find out for you. Don't go into too great of detail, though. Remember, this is the Internet!


Mr. M



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:44 AM
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I was joking starchild



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:48 AM
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Originally posted by ilovepizza
I was joking starchild



It's all good. When you said that, I was thinking, "Oh my god, here we go again.".


Don't worry about clearances and stuff. They are not in place to purposely deprive people of information, they are set so that our nation's critical information can be maintained by the least amount of people possible, thus reducing the risk of leakage to foreign entities.

Clearances are a good thing.


Mr. M



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:54 AM
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starchild what did you think of the document i posted a link to. It is really interesting isnt it.



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 03:58 AM
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Originally posted by ilovepizza
starchild what did you think of the document i posted a link to. It is really interesting isnt it.


That's a very good reference for this type of subject, and it is recent, which is rare. Hold on a second, and I'll get you something even better than that.


Mr. M



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 04:02 AM
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mcrsc.mfr.usmc.mil...

This is the form everyone must fill out in order to obtain a clearance. Just so you can know what to expect in case you ever do apply for a job that requires one, you'll know what they're looking for.

Mr. M



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 04:06 AM
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That is 29 pages long. I would hate filling out those 29 pages. It would be hell.



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 04:15 AM
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Here is some info about storing information pertaining to security clearances.


A0380-67 DAMI

System name:

Personnel Security Clearance Information Files (February 22, 1993, 58 FR 10002).

System location:

Joint Adjudicative Clearance System (segment of the Defense Central Index of Investigation), Defense Investigative Service, Fort Holabird, MD 21203-1211.

Decentralized segments may be maintained by offices at Department of the Army Staff agencies, major commands, installations, activities, and unified and specified commands, as records relate to the individual's personnel security and clearance status. Official mailing addresses are published as an appendix to the Army's compilation of systems of records notices.

Categories of individuals covered by the system:

Any individual, civilian or military, affiliated with the U.S. Army by assignment, employment, contractual relationship, or as the result of an interservice support agreement on whom a personnel security clearance determination has been completed, is in process, or may be pending.

Categories of records in the system:

File may contain pending and completed personnel security clearance actions on individuals by personal identifying data. It may also contain briefing/debriefing statements for special programs, sensitive positions, and other related information and documents required in connection with personnel security clearance determinations.

Authority for maintenance of the system:

10 U.S.C. 3013; 50 U.S.C. 4039; and the National Security Act of 1947; E.O. 10450 and 10865; and E.O. 9397 (SSN).

Purpose(s):

To assist in the processing of personnel security clearance actions, to record security clearances issued or denied; and to verify eligibility for access to classified information or assignment to a sensitive position.

Routine uses of records maintained in the system, including categories of users and the purposes of such uses:

In addition to those disclosures generally permitted under 5 U.S.C. 552a(b) of the Privacy Act, these records or information contained therein may specifically be disclosed outside the DoD as a routine use pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(b)(3) as follows:

Information may be released to federal agencies based on formal accreditation as specified in official directives, regulations, and demonstrated need-to-know; to federal, state, local, and foreign law enforcement, intelligence, or security agencies in connection with a lawful investigation under their jurisdiction; and to commanders/agency heads for adverse personnel actions such as fraudulent enlistment proceedings, removal from sensitive duties, elimination from the service, removal from employment, denial to a restricted or sensitive area, and revocation of security clearance.

The `Blanket Routine Uses' set forth at the beginning of the Army's compilation of systems of records notices also apply to this system.

Policies and practices for storing, retrieving, accessing, retaining, and disposing of records in the system:

Storage:

Paper records in folders, file cards; computer tape, punch cards, or disks.

Retrievability:

Alphabetically by individual's surname or Social Security Number.

Safeguards:

Records are stored in locked buildings which employ security guards and are subject to Military Policy and/or local civilian law enforcement patrol security. All records are maintained in areas accessible only to authorized personnel who are properly screened, cleared, and trained. Use of computers, including remote terminals, requires knowledge of special transaction codes to preserve integrity of data.

Retention and disposal:

Primary system files are destroyed at the same time as the dossier upon which security clearance action was based. Decentralized Segment personnel security clearance files are either (1) destroyed upon termination of access, (2) destroyed 1 year from the date of transfer or separation of individual, or (3) forwarded to the gaining organization. Investigative reports are forwarded to the United States Army Central Personnel Security clearance Facility, Fort Meade, MD for inclusion in dossier at the United States Army Intelligence and Security Command Investigative Records Repository, Fort Meade, MD 20755-5995. Dossiers are maintained no longer than 15 years from date of last entry unless significant adverse information is present, in which case retention is 25 years. Copies of investigative reports are destroyed upon completion of final action.

System manager(s) and address:

Commander, U.S. Army Central Personnel Security Clearance Facility, Fort Meade, MD 20755-5250.

Notification procedure:

Individuals seeking to determine information about the status or degree of personnel security clearance/access contained in this system should address written inquiries to the installation or command security officer where assigned or employed. Information contained in investigative files may be obtained from the appropriate investigative agency.

Individual should provide the full name, Social Security Number, current address, and telephone number.

Record access procedures:

Individuals seeking access to information about themselves contained in this system should address written inquiries to the Commander, ATTN: Security Officer, of the command or installation where assigned or employed.

Individual should provide the full name, Social Security Number, current address, and telephone number.

For personal visits to the Security Office, the individual should be able to provide identification (e.g., driver's license, identification card) and verbal information that can be verified with officer records.

Requests for information contained in investigative files should be addressed to appropriate investigative agency with personal identifying data required by that system as published in the Federal Register.

Contesting record procedures:

The Army's rules for accessing records, and for contesting contents and appealing initial agency determinations are contained in Army Regulation 340-21; 32 CFR part 505; or may be obtained from the system manager.

Record source categories:

From the individual; investigative results from the Defense Investigative Service, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command, and other Federal, Department of Defense, and Army investigative or law enforcement agencies.

Exemptions claimed for the system:

Parts of this system may be exempt pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(1), (k)(2), or (k)(5), as applicable.

An exemption rule for this system has been promulgated in accordance with requirements of 5 U.S.C. 553(b)(1), (2), and (3), (c), and (e) and published in 32 CFR part 505. For additional information contact the system manager.


Mr. M



posted on Mar, 26 2004 @ 04:17 AM
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Here is some more info pertaining to why security clearances are necessary.


The U.S. Government conducts background investigations to establish that applicants for national security positions are eligible for the required security clearances. Within the U.S. Army Cadet Command, such background investigations shall be completed and favorable security clearance determinations made prior to commissioning contracted cadets. Exceptions will be made only on a case-by-case basis.

a. Within the continental United States, the DSS conducts personnel security investigations. Outside the continental United States, the DSS employs Military Intelligence (MI) special agents to conduct these investigations.

b. A personnel security investigation encompasses the following qualities of an individual:

(1) Honesty; (2) Trustworthiness; (3) Character; (4) Loyalty; (5) Financial Responsibility; and (6) Reliability.

All of these areas present a view of the individual's entire character to the appropriate DOD officials so that USACCF adjudicators have complete and accurate information on which to make an appropriate security determination.

c. The investigation generally includes inquiries of law enforcement files, financial checks, and review of pertinent records. Some investigations will include an interview with the applicant and/or the applicant's friends, co-workers, employers, neighbors, and other individuals, as appropriate.

d. The DSS conducts several different types of personnel security investigations depending on the type of clearance or access the individual requires. For contracted cadet purposes, the National Agency Check, Local Agency Check, and Local Credit Check (NACLC) investigation and the Single Scope Background Investigation (SSBI) for Secret and Top Secret security clearances, respectively, are discussed.

(1) The NACLC investigation is the minimum standard investigation for all individuals entering the Armed Forces. For a contracted cadet, the NACLC is the minimum investigation required prior to being commissioned and being granted a Secret security clearance.

(2) For a contracted cadet selected in a MOS requiring a Top Secret security clearance (i.e., Military Intelligence), a favorably completed SSBI is the standard investigation required prior to placement in the MOS.


Mr. M



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