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Is Corn A Gift From Aliens?

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posted on Oct, 9 2008 @ 12:01 AM
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I need some help with something that I read many years ago.

This was when I was a pre teen back in the mid 70's when I first began getting interested in the topic of UFO's and aliens.
I don't remember the exact details but this has stayed with me over the years.

Basically what I remember reading in this article/publication was a claim the author was making about the origins of corn.
The claim was that corn is originally not from this Earth and that it was actually something the aliens brought with them from their place of origin many years ago.

Again, I don't remember the exact details so I don't know if this was something the aliens did intentionally, or if it was something they just decided to leave behind for us.

Of course we know corn thrives in certain regions of the world and according to this site, corn was developed in central Mexico about 7,000 years ago.

Why Mexico?
Maybe the Mayans knew the truth about corn?
Maybe the Mayans were the recipients of this gift?

Corn is certainly very different from most other fruits and vegetables we grow and cultivate, in fact it's almost freaky looking.
Why are some parts of corn indigestible?

And given the share of recent headlines over the concern of the corn market and the effects it has on feed, grains, the meat market and alternative fuel production, it almost appears as if someone or something knew corn would play an extremely vital role in our modern world.

I'm hoping someone can help in identifying the book or the magazine article in question.




posted on Oct, 9 2008 @ 12:12 AM
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I'd be interested in this information too. Corn was only found in the Americas until after Columbus. Yet, the Rosslyn Chapel-- of Templar Knights reputation -- has corn decorations on its interior, though it was built before then.



posted on Oct, 9 2008 @ 12:17 AM
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It must be. That Kettle Corn is sure amazing. I mean, how do they get that on the popcorn? Amazing.



posted on Oct, 9 2008 @ 12:42 AM
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That would certainly explain why I've been craving corn chips for the last 3 months. I go through 2 or three bags a week -- plain doritos I like...mmm, thanks aliens.



posted on Oct, 9 2008 @ 12:46 AM
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What is this tomfoolery corn is a domesticated cereal grain. Here are the possible orgins:

1. It is a direct domestication of a Mexican annual teosinte, Zea mays ssp. parviglumis, native to the Balsas River valley of southern Mexico, with up to 12% of its genetic material obtained from Zea mays ssp. mexicana through introgression.
2. It derives from hybridization between a small domesticated maize (a slightly changed form of a wild maize) and a teosinte of section Luxuriantes, either Z. luxurians or Z. diploperennis.
3. It underwent two or more domestications either of a wild maize or of a teosinte.
4. It evolved from a hybridization of Z. diploperennis by Tripsacum dactyloides. (The term "teosinte" describes all species and subspecies in the genus Zea, excluding Zea mays ssp. mays.) In the late 1930s, Paul Mangelsdorf suggested that domesticated maize was the result of a hybridization event between an unknown wild maize and a species of Tripsacum, a related genus. However, the proposed role of tripsacum (gama grass) in the origins of maize has been refuted by modern genetic testing, refuting Mangelsdorf’s model and the fourth listed above.

Probability and history makes it without a doubt ludicrous to state that there is a good chance of extraterrestrial origin.



posted on Oct, 9 2008 @ 01:22 AM
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I'm not sure where the story originates but I'm fairly sure it was mentioned in Lyall Watson's book "Supernature" . Which is a very interesting book actually.



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by bodhran
 


That's not the book I was referring to but thanks for that bit of info.
I'll check that out and hopefully this will help in tracking the origin of this claim.



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by Matrix1111
 


The story is the surviving Templars knew of the Americas and sailed there to hide a portion of their great treasure. Where they actually hid it is anyone's guess.

They also have found tobacco and cocoa leaves in Egyptian mummies.

It is possible an ancient American culture genetically created corn. How long ago and why is another question.



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 05:50 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 08:00 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 08:59 PM
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reply to post by Grey Magic
 


No but Bananas are. The Banana has no germinating seed. It is also one of the few foods on the planet, that by itself can sustain life indefinitely. If I were to have to pick a prolific, self-replicating food source for an experimental primate culture, I would certainly pick the Banana.....



posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 07:48 AM
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Originally posted by kidflash2008
reply to post by Matrix1111
 


The story is the surviving Templars knew of the Americas and sailed there to hide a portion of their great treasure. Where they actually hid it is anyone's guess.


I recall reading something about it being buried in Nova Scotia. (Arcadia) But I doubt it's still there. Just like the Rosslyn Chapel treasure is no longer there.



posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 09:19 AM
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Originally posted by Matrix1111
Corn was only found in the Americas until after Columbus.

Where on earth did you get that information?
It is a well known fact that native americans introduced corn to the pilgrims not vice versa.
We had it long before mr.columbus ever got here.




posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by NephraTari

Originally posted by Matrix1111
Corn was only found in the Americas until after Columbus.

Where on earth did you get that information?
It is a well known fact that native americans introduced corn to the pilgrims not vice versa.
We had it long before mr.columbus ever got here.



You've misread my confused, jumbled semantics. Sorry. Of course corn is from the Americas. My intended point was that after Columbus, corn was introduced elsewhere.



posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 11:02 AM
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I think chewing gum is alien food too. When I blow a big bubble and it burst into my face. Then I look like an alien...


[edit on 13-10-2008 by Benarius]



posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 11:27 AM
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Here's the seaweed that I saw once myself and I think it's a better candidate as a gift from aliens -- it just looks way too weird:

www.youtube.com...

It's actually edible. Alaskans pickle it and use it in salads.


[edit on 13-10-2008 by buddhasystem]



posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 03:02 PM
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Originally posted by Matrix1111

You've misread my confused, jumbled semantics. Sorry. Of course corn is from the Americas. My intended point was that after Columbus, corn was introduced elsewhere.
I am truly sorry, yes I did misunderstand you.



posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 06:41 PM
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Originally posted by Benarius
I think chewing gum is alien food too. When I blow a big bubble and it burst into my face. Then I look like an alien...


[edit on 13-10-2008 by Benarius]


Yea and after all corn has to be from aliens. its just so special. What other food can you see before you eat it AND after you.... well you see where im going with this


For some reason all those crop cirles that pop up in corn fields keep coming to my mind.

Perhaps aliens like corn and dont carry money so in exchange for some corn they leave the farmer a nice pretty picture?


Seriously though, I have no clue about corn or the possbility of it coming from aliens. This is the first I have heard some one suggest that possibility though. Interesting to contemplate for a while I suppose.



posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 06:51 PM
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Now if you were talking about the rock band Corn, yea, they came from aliens and the aliens hate us.


As for the veggie, Man has been cultivating crops for a very long time. I'm not saying it's not an alien crop, I just need a little more info on the subject. Like, was the guy who originally made this claim under the influence of corn whiskey?

It's an interesting thought. If we did come from an alien species they would have had to leave us some sort of replicating food supply.

Ponder this I will



posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 07:55 PM
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History of corn

The Natchez Indians of Arkansas have an entirely different view:



The primary food crop for Indians of Arkansas and the South was corn. How did they acquire this crop? In the Caddo story discussed previously, the first man gave seed crops to the people while they were still living below, and when they came out onto the Earth’s surface this was one of things carried by the first woman. The Natchez Indians have another account for the origin of corn, which explains why people must work to raise it.
Harvest
The Natchez story explains why people must work to raise crops.

Once upon a time twin girls lived with Corn Woman. Whenever they finished eating all of their food, Corn Woman went to the storehouse with two baskets. The baskets were always filled when she returned. One time the girls looked into the storehouse and saw that it was empty. “Where does she get the food” they wondered? “Next time she goes in there we will creep up and watch her.” So the twins followed Corn Woman on her next trip to the storehouse. They peeped through a crack. What they saw surprised them. Corn Woman set the basket on the floor, then squatted over it and rubbed her thighs. There was a noise, then an ear of corn fell into the basket. In this way she filled one basket, and in the same way filled the other but this time with beans. The girls ran away horrified. When Corn Woman cooked their next meal, the girls wouldn’t eat. Corn Woman guessed what happened. “Since you think my food is filthy, you will have to help yourselves from now on.” Corn Woman told the girls to kill her, burn her body and spread the ashes on the ground. She said that in summer plants would grow, and the girls would have to cultivate them while they ripened. The girls did what they were told, and sure enough the next summer corn, beans, and pumpkins grew up where Corn Woman’s ashes had been spread. The girls cultivated the plants every day, leaving their hoes stuck in the ground when they finished. And each day they returned, they found that even more ground had been hoed and their hoes were in different places. “Let’s creep up at night and find out who is doing this” the girls said. That night they saw that the hoes were working all by themselves. The girls laughed out loud, and immediately the hoes fell to the ground and never worked by themselves again. From that day on, people have had to work hard to cultivate their fields.
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Well that certainly explains alot. (..more than I cared to know..) It even goes into the reason why "hoes" cannot work by themselves any more, and must be governed by a "pimp". (sorry couldnt resist)


According to Indian Culture and myth, corn comes from surprising sources. It seems a common theme and is quite disgusting, but makes you wonder..if MYTH is base loosely on FACT then ...ewww!

Lets explore further....



Most North Americans were raised with a glorified tale of the first Thanksgiving, a historical event that dates back to a 1621 feast in Plymouth, Massachusetts. A large part of that tradition is centered around the Indian named Squanto, who not only is commonly given credit for suggesting the traditional Thanksgiving feast to Pilgrims, he’s also given credit for teaching them to grow corn using fish as a fertilizer. That part of the story is historically accurate....

Corn harvest myths

Considering some of the sources cited by our Indian brothers and sisters of yesteryear, I would prefer to think corn came from "aliens" as apposed to traditional myths. Interesting topic, indeed.




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