Thinking about taking off to Alaskan Wilderness.Any suggestions?

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posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 09:32 PM
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This is a mad world we live in,and it seems doom and gloom are the norm,if you are paying the slightest attention.With everything seemingly headed for ruin and police state,I want to be left the hell alone.I want to start this post off by saying I want real advice here,not phony anecdotes.I really am at war with myself here.I do not know if I would be better off here or there.I feel like at the least I will learn how to grow my own food and live off the land,which will put me at a greater advantage than many Americans.Let me give you a bit of history.I am 29 years old.I come from a crappy background,but did not let it slow me down.I have lived in four states,gone to 12 different schools before I dropped out in the 10th grade and acquired a G.E.D.have done a lot of things,like worked on tugboats,was an electrician,cook,ranch hand,plumber,landscaper,and waiter.I have showed promise in all of the above professions,but none really do it for me.I am a good unsigned musician.I am currently attending a community college to be a history teacher,one of my passions is history.I am beginning to believe that I need to detox from society in general.I really have nothing holding me here.I am sick of all the lies and general population of blank faced dolts,pretended academics,the poor and rich with equally silly views of entitlement.Even typing this is reinforcing my decision to leave it all behind for a while.So,I would like some advice.I will not be leaving(if I even do)for at least a few months.I don't know how long I will stay in Alaska,maybe years.I obviously can't take everything I would need,so what do you think I should bring?How would I get there?Has anybody else seriously thought about doing this?What stopped you?And again,serious replies only please,Thank you.




posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 09:38 PM
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I lived in Alaska for a number of years.

There is a saying I always heard....."you are either in Alaska for the military, the pipeline or to hide from something"


Alaska is incredible wilderness. I can easily see why people go there to hide. And I can see why some people love to live there: the scenery, hunting and outdoor recreation.

However, it is not for everyone. It gets REEEEEEEALY COLD there in the winter. So cold, that now 30 degrees F is WARM to me. However, I lived northcentral Alaska about 2.5 hrs from the Artic Circle...where I saw -30 thruout winter. Down around Anchorage, it doesnt get as cold


It is also very expensive to live there.

Also, I drove into Alaska.....it was a loooooooooong drive (and I did it in summer), taking me thru Canada. Leaving Alaska, I drove then rode the ferry out....VERY expensive and it took 2 days to drive to the ferry, then a week on the ferry into Washington State.


Do you have any more specific questions? Just ask....there are a couple of Alaskans on this board that can probably help too :d

[edit on 10/8/2008 by greeneyedleo]



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 09:50 PM
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The place is frozen over eight months out of the year. Up in Fairbanks they leave their cars running overnight just so they don't have to risk starting them in the morning. Pack some warm things.



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 09:50 PM
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You can't keep running, stick it out and make a decision and roll with it and make it happen.

[edit on 8-10-2008 by mazzroth]



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 09:55 PM
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Originally posted by starviego
The place is frozen over eight months out of the year. Up in Fairbanks they leave their cars running overnight just so they don't have to risk starting them in the morning. Pack some warm things.


Um. That is not true! I know, as I lived there.

Majority of cars have engine block heaters that you plug in. Some may leave the car running, when running into a store for a short time...but the cars are NOT left on all night long.



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:02 PM
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Here's my advice: Make sure you don't screw up like John McCandless did



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:06 PM
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reply to post by Deepblu
 


haha agreed you definitely want to watch into the wild first ... it'll give you a good glimpse of what it would be like ... of course with a little bit of a hollywood touch to it, but still a very good movie if you're really considering it



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:08 PM
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Daeoeste, you're a man of my own heart. Just do one thing.

Read Into the Wild. Or watch the film.

The wilderness doesn't judge, a nice relief from human society, but it is not always a good thing. Nature won't spare you for who you are. She does not exist for our pleasure and a lot of us would perish under even her more mild moods. Alaska can have a mighty fiesty temper.

If you're going to Alaska, go to a town. Don't try to make it in the wilderness. Just don't.

[edit on 8-10-2008 by Siblin]



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:09 PM
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If you go, go with a companion who is of the same mindset. I spent 2 years in/near Alaska, and alone don't cut it. Truly.

Look at heirloom seed websites, and carry with you some open-pollinated seeds that are appropriate for whatever zone you intend to set up camp. You said "Alaska", but there are three distinctly different zones there, one of which doesn't grow much of anything...... I'd recommend not going much north of Noatak Nat'l Forest unless you have prearranged work there.

It sounds like you want to forage for your own, build your own shelter, live off the land. It can be done. Even in this age, much of Alaska is rugged, and requres seriously rugged individuals to inhabit it. In the mid -to southern areas, the growing season is remarkably long, and I've seen myself strawberries that were more than two inches across.

Do you intend to hunt for meat? Best become acquainted with the migration patterns of game in the area you're thinking of going to. I suspect that fish will play a large part of your protein.

I wish you well. I once thought that Alaska was the place to be, and I did well for a couple of years, but I didn't develop a meaningful relationship beyond basic sexual needs. I think most people need a partner, a trusted and loving mate to survive in the wilds of Alaska or Canada. I've had occasion to see flashes of humanity while paddling the expanse of the Great Slave Lake in Canada. They didn't seem happy. They seemed furtive, and I avoided them. They made my dog growl.

Goodl luck partner. Take a lot of hand tools -- augers, hand drills, crosscut saws, adz, drawknifes, mauls, axe (double-bit), perhaps a Pulaski, whatever else will help you forage out a ........... home.

Keep in touch. You might be a start of a WAVE.*


*go through the gate and close it behind you -- it's the American way



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:10 PM
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reply to post by daeoeste
 


My advice is to make sure that you don't end up like Chris McCandless: starving and alone in the wilderness. Make sure you are fully prepared and have covered all the grounds if you plan on 'living off the land.'

If you search through the Survival boards here you will find many good threads concerning what to pack/carry and what you may have to do to really live off the land. Best of luck to you whatever you decide, just prepare yourself and have all the angles covered before you do anything!



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:13 PM
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I hitchhiked there with a buddy 3,000 miles from Portland. Clean yourself up good and have some funds saved up and you will never forget the experience. A couple of months from now is not the time to go via thumb however. It only took us a couple of weeks but flying really would be easier.

Once you get there its easy to find a cheap junker to get around in. Alaska is a special place with a unique sense of community due to the harsh winter climate and the remoteness. There are also many an opportunity to be had for the strong willed and willingness to step out of one's typical comfort zones.

I simply worked at Denali National Park in the kitchen, exploring the back-country in my freetime, and hitchin' to where I needed to go out of the park.

I wussed out and left when it started getting cold. My buddy stayed, became an EMT, and 8 years later still loves it. I did come home with a handful of seasonal work cash and a greater sense of self, indepence and confidence. A great place to get the hell out of dodge for sure. There were many a runaway felon roaming that place. Equally as many tired of the every day bs and wanting to mix things up and get a change of scenery.

Sounds like you're in a place in your life where you could use some Alaska. I encourage you to go and explore yourself and this beautiful to its fullest.



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:15 PM
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Originally posted by Siblin
Daeoeste, you're a man of my own heart. Just do one thing.

Read Into the Wild. Or watch the film.

If you're going to Alaska, go to a town. Don't try to make it in the wilderness. Just don't.


Beat me to it.

All my genuine wilderness experience is desert (although I have gone snow camping) so it's kinda the opposite of what you need.

But one piece of advice will never go out of style, and that comes from BP:

Be Prepared.

And, yeah, go read Into the Wild. Don't be the next moron who needs to be rescued at great cost by the local Sherrif's office. All over the world locals hate, HATE, having to rescue dumb city morons who got themselves in trouble and then demanded someone else get them out of it.

Remember this handy fact: When you are sleeping you begin to freeze to death at a balmy 15 degrees C. What temperature does it get down to in Alaska?



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:20 PM
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reply to post by HowlrunnerIV
 




Remember this handy fact: When you are sleeping you begin to freeze to death at a balmy 15 degrees C. What temperature does it get down to in Alaska?



NEGATIVE 30 degrees F is what one will experience during mid winter up in the Fairbanks area. That converts to: -34.4444444 degree Celsius


Camping in those temperatures IMHO is not recommended at all.



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:21 PM
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I'm with you man I've been feeling the same way for awhile so you just tell me where to meet and I'm there. I've been contemplating going alone for some time but like others have mentioned on this thread, Into the Wild showed me that isn't the best choice. So seriously...give me a time and place and I am there because all my friends don't seem the least bit interested it getting back to basics and living off the land. I play music as well so I would be looking forward to some Alaskan wilderness jam sessions...haha let me know man



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:21 PM
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I lived and worked construction in Anchorage for a summer. I made a lot of money. Living in the bush is possible but take industrial strength insect repellent because you will need it. Also a big pistol and a shot gun might come in handy.

Good Luck!



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:24 PM
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You watched or read "Into the Wild" one too many times. This time of year, you will not make it. Not with all the proper equipment or gear. If you're not an incredibly skilled hunter/tracker/gatherer/meat curer, you'll never make it. Work on those things before you try it. Remember what happened in Into the Wild, right? I agree with some posts above. I can do the same thing, but I'm going to stick it out. This is one of the most incredible times in American history and you're running away? Tough it out.



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:26 PM
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Yes I have a suggestion.
Take very warm clothes.
"Up in Fairbanks they leave their cars running overnight"
No wonder the damn ice caps are melting.



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:29 PM
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Originally posted by greeneyedleo
Majority of cars have engine block heaters that you plug in. Some may leave the car running, when running into a store for a short time...but the cars are NOT left on all night long.


No, you only do that with diesels, not petrol engines, and then only with your tractor, bulldozer or tank. AND THEN only when you don't have a block heater, anti-freeze and wind-proof structure.

Hell, the only thing you really need to do is remember to lift your wipers off the windscreen if you're parking the car outside during the day. Oh, and don't ever pour warm water over your iced-up windscreen!

Back to block heaters...I read a long time ago that the original bush pilots used to build pot-belly stoves under their 'planes to thaw the engines in the morning. Now, talk about tough, flying an open-cockpit biplane around the Alaskan autumn and winter!



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:41 PM
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Lived in Alaska for a couple of years... though it was only anchorage, it takes a different kind of person to live up there.

Oh yea, two words that alaskans love... Duct Tape



posted on Oct, 8 2008 @ 10:52 PM
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Hi,

I myself have gone through this, it was great, I loved it and you should go for it. Make sure to bring along a tent, some flint, a water bottle, lighters, socks (for tinder to start fires, as well as for warmth), gasoline, laptop, pots, cups, etc. All these things are for survival, I'm sure you'll be living in a nice warm cabin though, but all that is just backup. Also if you want diamonds, the rivers/streams are full of them, bring along a sifter, you're sure to find some. I've found small chunks of pure gold as well, just gotta find the right stream. Right, forgot one thing, weapons. Bring along a few BB guns, real guns, bow n arrows, swords, anything that will protect you.

Also a suggestion, ever watch the tv series, Survivor Man, and Man vs Wild? These two guys have episodes on surviving in Alaska. Be sure to check them out. Interesting, educational, and fun to watch. I plan on leaving again pretty soon, maybe in wilderness Alaska, maybe a jungle or forest, but somewhere where I can be at peace and do what ever I want.

Safe journey.

Peace.




 
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