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Ammo found on the Lusitania

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posted on Oct, 6 2008 @ 11:06 AM
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As many suspected, but had nothing to offer as to evidence, something of interest finally comes to light....


"We found literally thousands of what appear to be Remington .303 bullets of the kind used by troops during World War One," said Mr Carey.


Wouldn't this mean there was a considerable amount of explosives in its hold, if these were found unspent?


The Lusitania was believed to be 'just an ocean liner, carrying passengers'.


The ill-fated liner sank after being torpedoed by a German UBoat in 1915, with the loss of more than 1,200 passengers and crew.







At the time the German military command claimed that the ship was a legitimate target, as they believed it was carrying munitions from neutral America to help the Allied war effort.



This makes me wonder how good the German intelligence was back then, they seemed to know the true cargo unless it was just a good guess.


Full Story

And this one is a little more informative..

Diver Finds Ammunition on the Lusitania




posted on Oct, 6 2008 @ 12:03 PM
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I had heard that the sinking of the Lusitania was a 'false flag' operations of sorts, they either knew it would be sunk or sent it deliberately to evoke a provocation for America's entry into the war.

No matter the theory, at least we know now that she did in fact carry ammunition. Which had been denied by historians for quite some time.



posted on Oct, 6 2008 @ 12:07 PM
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Originally posted by Grailkeeper

This makes me wonder how good the German intelligence was back then, they seemed to know the true cargo unless it was just a good guess.
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And, the German government gave good and fair warning with regard to the Lusitania. That's not to say this wasn't an awful tragedy with the loss of many innocent non-combatants, but the ship was sailed through a declared war zone. I put most of the blame with Cunard and the British government, moreso if the ship's passengers were being used as unwitting 'gun mules'.

[edit on 6-10-2008 by Merriman Weir]



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 08:56 AM
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It would be interesting to take a look at which chains of newspapers and news services sourced the story. Could be an early indicator of which services were being used as controlled news organizations to frame the story as the government desired.



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 09:32 AM
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Information deleted by poster. Information was found to be incorrect by me!

[edit on 12/7/2008 by ZindoDoone]

[edit on 12/7/2008 by ZindoDoone]



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 10:16 AM
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The fact it was carrying ammo is irrelevant.

Because the Admiralty had ordered all British Merchant vessels to immediately report U-boat sightings and attempt to ram them if they did see any, they were no long considered Merchant ships and were considered naval auxiliaries instead. This made them a legitimate target, however unpallatable.

Lusitania was also fitted with gun mounts and was going to be turned into an Auxilliary cruiser anyway. She had been bought and paid for by the Uk Government by loans to Cunard under the understanding that in times of war, she could be fitted to be a blockade runner.

However, the sinking and subsequent events was a propoganda coup for the British and allowed us to begin formenting anti-German feeling in the USA, eventually bringing them into the War in 1917.

I actually find it quite interesting that in both world wars, the UK had to do an awful lot of media work, bribing and other underhand games to bring the USA on side. You would be surprised what we got up too



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 10:50 AM
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Originally posted by stumasonLusitania was also fitted with gun mounts and was going to be turned into an Auxilliary cruiser anyway. She had been bought and paid for by the Uk Government by loans to Cunard under the understanding that in times of war, she could be fitted to be a blockade runner.


If I'm not mistaken, all ships under British, and I think, Canadian registry actually 'belong' to the Crown for precisely this reason. While Cunard miight expect to be reimbursed for use or loss of the ship...they could not decline it's use.



posted on Dec, 7 2008 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 


The Defence of the Realm act allows ships to be commandeered for Military use, see the QE2 for example. But this didn't come into being until about half way through WW1. I am not sure on the exact legalities before that, but it would seem the Lusitania was built with a Government loan on the proviso it could be converted to an Auxilliary Cruiser if needed.

Had the Admiralty not issued the orders to report and ram, then the Germans would have operated under "cruiser law" which would mean they had to give fair warning and allow the civilians time to abandon ship. As the British waived this right, because of the order, then all Allied civilian ships became fair game under maritime law, because they would have been classed as "Auxilliary Cruisers".




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