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The US is not a Democracy

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posted on Mar, 28 2004 @ 04:06 PM
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We're a Democratic Republic, because a true democracy cannot survive in a nations. Imagine if you had to vote on ever single bill and law passed in this country. You wouldn't have time for anything else, like a job. So we select people to vote for us




Or maybe we just wouldnt have so many laws and government agencies noses up our asses




posted on Mar, 28 2004 @ 04:16 PM
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Originally posted by Amuk



We're a Democratic Republic, because a true democracy cannot survive in a nations. Imagine if you had to vote on ever single bill and law passed in this country. You wouldn't have time for anything else, like a job. So we select people to vote for us




Or maybe we just wouldnt have so many laws and government agencies noses up our asses


You beat me to it Amuk.



posted on Mar, 28 2004 @ 09:31 PM
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this is the definition from merriam-webster.com:

1 a : government by the people; especially : rule of the majority b : a government in which the supreme power is vested in the people and exercised by them directly or indirectly through a system of representation usually involving periodically held free elections
2 : a political unit that has a democratic government
3 capitalized : the principles and policies of the Democratic party in the U.S.
4 : the common people especially when constituting the source of political authority
5 : the absence of hereditary or arbitrary class distinctions or privileges

ha. when was this country ever a democracy if you actually look at what the word actually means? when has our government ever met one of those points?



posted on Mar, 29 2004 @ 11:55 PM
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A Mrs. Powel of Philadelphia asked Benjamin Franklin, "Well, Doctor, what have we got, a republic or a monarchy?" With no hesitation whatsoever, Franklin responded, "A republic, if you can keep it."

The Founding Fathers supported the view that (in the words of the Declaration of Independence) "Men … are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights." They recognized that such rights should not be violated by an unrestrained majority any more than they should be violated by an unrestrained king or monarch. In fact, they recognized that majority rule would quickly degenerate into mobocracy and then into tyranny. They had studied the history of both the Greek democracies and the Roman republic. They had a clear understanding of the relative freedom and stability that had characterized the latter, and of the strife and turmoil — quickly followed by despotism — that had characterized the former. In drafting the Constitution, they created a government of law and not of men, a republic and not a democracy.

But don’t take our word for it! Consider the words of the Founding Fathers themselves, who — one after another — condemned democracy.

• Virginia’s Edmund Randolph participated in the 1787 convention. Demonstrating a clear grasp of democracy’s inherent dangers, he reminded his colleagues during the early weeks of the Constitutional Convention that the purpose for which they had gathered was "to provide a cure for the evils under which the United States labored; that in tracing these evils to their origin every man had found it in the turbulence and trials of democracy...."

• Samuel Adams, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, championed the new Constitution in his state precisely because it would not create a democracy. "Democracy never lasts long," he noted. "It soon wastes, exhausts and murders itself." He insisted, "There was never a democracy that ‘did not commit suicide.’"

• New York’s Alexander Hamilton, in a June 21, 1788 speech urging ratification of the Constitution in his state, thundered: "It has been observed that a pure democracy if it were practicable would be the most perfect government. Experience has proved that no position is more false than this. The ancient democracies in which the people themselves deliberated never possessed one good feature of government. Their very character was tyranny; their figure deformity." Earlier, at the Constitutional Convention, Hamilton stated: "We are a Republican Government. Real liberty is never found in despotism or in the extremes of Democracy."

• James Madison, who is rightly known as the "Father of the Constitution," wrote in The Federalist, No. 10: "... democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security, or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they are violent in their deaths." The Federalist Papers, recall, were written during the time of the ratification debate to encourage the citizens of New York to support the new Constitution.

• George Washington, who had presided over the Constitutional Convention and later accepted the honor of being chosen as the first President of the United States under its new Constitution, indicated during his inaugural address on April 30, 1789, that he would dedicate himself to "the preservation … of the republican model of government."

• Fisher Ames served in the U.S. Congress during the eight years of George Washington’s presidency. A prominent member of the Massachusetts convention that ratified the Constitution for that state, he termed democracy "a government by the passions of the multitude, or, no less correctly, according to the vices and ambitions of their leaders." On another occasion, he labeled democracy’s majority rule one of "the intermediate stages towards … tyranny." He later opined: "Democracy, in its best state, is but the politics of Bedlam; while kept chained, its thoughts are frantic, but when it breaks loose, it kills the keeper, fires the building, and perishes." And in an essay entitled The Mire of Democracy, he wrote that the framers of the Constitution "intended our government should be a republic, which differs more widely from a democracy than a democracy from a despotism."



posted on Mar, 22 2009 @ 09:30 AM
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1h.) Spamming: You will not post identical content, or snippets of identical content, to multiple threads in the discussion forums.


[edit on 22-3-2009 by 12m8keall2c]



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 08:51 PM
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we are a constitutional republic www.youtube.com...



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 08:55 PM
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Originally posted by Jonna
No, it is a representative republic. Want proof just look at the last election.


PS Just an interesting thing to note, someone here once stated that the word democracy is nowhere in the Declaration of Independence.

[Edited on 24-3-2004 by Jonna]


Neither is "separation of church and state" in the Declaration or the Constitution. Interesting.


[edit on 10/29/09 by Ferris.Bueller.II]



posted on Oct, 29 2009 @ 10:52 PM
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The Usa is suppose to be a republic which like a democracy is governed by the people or by representatives elected by the people. The difference in a republic is that it protects minority rights unlike a democracy where it is strictly ruled by majority and whatever makes the majority happy is what is done even if it angers the minority.



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