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Sat Phones - Use in a SitX

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posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 11:59 AM
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One of the posters got me thinking on how handy a Satellite Phone might be come SITX.
Yes I know Satellites might be affected but there again?
If the SITX is localised and you are in the hotzone then a Sat Phone might be the only way of getting a call to the 'outside' made.

I know frfom personal experience that when I was working on the South Coast (UK) at the time of the 7/7 bombings getting a cellular/mobile phone call made was impossible.
They were just jammed up for 5 hours solid.
This could be considered fairly mild compared with other disasters I think.

Anyone got a Sat Phone and actually put theres to the test during a disaster, Hurrican Icke and Katrina for example??

Thoughts and comments on this appreciated.




posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 12:12 PM
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I never thought of this so I went ahead did some quick searching.

The phones themselves cost about $1000 and the annual service plans are like 5-800 a year.

Interesting but way beyond my doable budget. Especially as a "just in case" thing to keep around.

Maybe if you could get the phone itself for around $300 and something similar to a pre-paid phone card that wouldn't expire it would be more feasible for a poor man such as myself.



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 12:18 PM
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So I'm betting the Satellite phone would be just as unusable as a Cell/Land Line.

Satellite phones are like any other phone, they have to terminate into the standard phone system which is where the breakdown occurs.

There also arent as many Sat Phone Satellites as you may think. I believe one goes over head about every 10 minutes (thats what I remember from trying to get one to use in the Desert of Texas).



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 12:23 PM
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You need to be a rich man to use a sat phone, they cost a fortune, and the calls cost a fortune, When I am out on some remote wind farms we use them on occasion, but only in an emergency cos they are so expensive.

BUT you forget two points, for YOUR sat Phone to work the Sat Phone network company has to be working and that actuially is a ground based terrestial call centre in most parts of the world, and you have to wonder if the people you are calling still have power or a connection to their phone serrvice provider.

Cell phones in a TEOTWAWKI situation will probably fail quite early as will most land line systems because most connections are made via microwave relay systems and fibre optics systems all which are very vulnerable.
The best we can probably hope for is a none repeater station based local Ham or PMR system or even a tweaked and boosted CB.



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 12:25 PM
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Does turning one of these on allow others to find you via GPS? If so, I wouldnt want one just for that reason. As for getting ahold of others, it sounds harsh, but I really dont care. My friends and family are never very far from me and we have a chosen location to fall back to should a serious emergency arise. In the area I am in, either blinding cold or a possible earthquake could create a scenerio where I could get cut off from who I would like to know the wearabouts of, but like I said, we have a rally point. Dont show up? Sorry, bad luck.

As for those who live in hurricane, flood, tornado areas and those who live in large cities which may be prone to terror attacks, these things arent cheap. Granted, I never waiver to spend money on the very best and most useful products out there, but this is a large commitment when proper planning and a little forsight about what to do and where to go in an emergency could do the same job.



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 01:21 PM
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So there are weaknesses.

I've done some research and these things are banned from totalitarian type places like Burma so as far as tying into the local networks, I think it depends.

Here's more that I could find:

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 01:23 PM
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reply to post by WatchRider
 


No...we don't have a Sat phone but we just bought a CB radio...just in case there's a SIT X. We wanted to have some way to be able to communicate in case it's not possible with conventional means.

My husband is going to order a couple of portable solar panels today that can be used to charge the batteries...just in case we need to be on the run or have no electricity. They're small enough to fit in our backpacks but powerful enough to give us a little juice.

The CB radio was around $100. I can't remember the exact cost of the solar panels, but I don't believe it will cost us over $350 (including shipping).



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 01:27 PM
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A long tie ago I started a thread here urging people to get into Ham radio. Nowadays it's pretty easy (no code requirement) and the equipment is relatively inexpensive and widely available. With a decent multi-band rig you can communicate locally, regionally and internationally relatively easily and on battery power if necessary. You may not be able to reach THE individual you want in realtime (unless they too have a radio) but there are means of geting messages relayed back-and-forth.



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 01:29 PM
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A bit expensive for mere mortals.

CB/HAM Shortwave seem to be the solution over sat phone, they carry their own transceiver and require no reliance on third party equipment.

No where near as cool though.



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 01:30 PM
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Who are you gonna call?
OOhh Gee we just lost all of our power and all of these people are dead and like it is just sooo horrible I can"t even find a mirror that isn't broken to comb my hair and........................

In the event of a real emergency you will be too busy trying to get by to call anyone. If it is a large enough situation everyone will already know the SHTF. Other than being used to report traffic accidents they are really about worthless.

reluctantpawn



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 03:40 PM
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Originally posted by Sendran
A bit expensive for mere mortals.

CB/HAM Shortwave seem to be the solution over sat phone, they carry their own transceiver and require no reliance on third party equipment.

No where near as cool though.


Sounds quite effective.

But!

How portable are Ham Radio sets.
They always seem to be the table top type.

Or can you get handheld sets, like with a Sat Phone???



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 04:17 PM
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Originally posted by salchanra
Does turning one of these on allow others to find you via GPS? .


Some sat phones doe actually used the Epirb and Elint system so that the lost survivor can be located and rescued, so yes nefarious agencies in theiry should be also be able to track you down.



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by reluctantpawn
Who are you gonna call?
OOhh Gee we just lost all of our power and all of these people are dead and like it is just sooo horrible I can"t even find a mirror that isn't broken to comb my hair and........................

In the event of a real emergency you will be too busy trying to get by to call anyone. If it is a large enough situation everyone will already know the SHTF. Other than being used to report traffic accidents they are really about worthless.

reluctantpawn


Aah, an expert on every possible situation, I was wondering if this forum had one, wish I hasd the perfect forsight to know everything.



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 04:59 PM
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WatchRider,

You're right, a little research and range is an issue, wish I'd have done it before my last post, but hey ho, live and learn.

The range of the hand held's is only about one mile open ground, with a large telescopic aerial around 2-5 miles. Not really the distances we're talking about. To cover greater distances you need relays in place that boost the signal, so that means third party reliance. After time you could set up these networks and larger antennae to communicate long distance, but initially handheld radio transceiver's etc are only effective short range.

There are portable units with much larger range but it all depends on the size of your antenna. Ahem.

Back to square one.



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 04:59 PM
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Originally posted by Sendran
CB/HAM Shortwave seem to be the solution over sat phone,


Yes, I was going to say that. A good shortwave HAM and a good antenna will allow you a huge range.



posted on Oct, 2 2008 @ 07:31 PM
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Handhelds can have some decent range in the 6m and 2m bands --- more so if repeaters are up. There are lots of portable, multi-band radios that can xmt/rcv internationally. I have a multi-band, 100w xcvr that is only 8 x 3 x 10". It's made to be portable, has (2) internal rechargeables, will run on external batteries (including in a car) and can work with a long wire antenna. It receives from 100kHz - 56MHz, 76-108MHz, 118-164MHz and 420-470MHz in all modes. That covers SW, broadcast, military, aircraft, EM, fire, police, etc. All in one portable unit. Being able to talk will be important but GETTING information --- listening --- will be even more so in a Sit-X. Getting intelligence will be very important in a Sit-X.



posted on Oct, 3 2008 @ 06:42 AM
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reply to post by Northern Raider
 


Nope not an expert on every possible situation but, I have survived numerous flash floods, tornadoes, a few hurricanes foreign and domestic, civil uprisings, insurgent assaults, and been held captive against my will. Yes I got around in my younger days. I have taught wilderness skills to people from the boyscouts and church groups to military groups. I believe I am qualified to have an opinion on the subject. What are your qualifications?

A satphone is useless in most scenarios for a number of reasons. One is that the weight and space limimtations make unfeasable to carry. Two do you know exactly where you are? How will someone find you if you cannot tell them you location. Three will it be feasable to rescue you? Are you worth the effort for someone namely a govt agency to come to your aid. Four is the situation bad enough that there are hundreds if not thousands of people in the same situation? What would make you special?

respectfully

reluctantpawn

edit for content


[edit on 3-10-2008 by reluctantpawn]

[edit on 3-10-2008 by reluctantpawn]



posted on Oct, 3 2008 @ 07:16 AM
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Originally posted by reluctantpawn
reply to post by Northern Raider
 


Nope not an expert on every possible situation but, I have survived numerous flash floods, tornadoes, a few hurricanes foreign and domestic, civil uprisings, insurgent assaults, and been held captive against my will. Yes I got around in my younger days. I have taught wilderness skills to people from the boyscouts and church groups to military groups. I believe I am qualified to have an opinion on the subject. What are your qualifications?
respectfully

reluctantpawn

22 Year Army veteran in the British Light Infantry, Skill at arms, field craft and survival instructor. Civilian Leadership qualified expedition leader. Survivalist since 1979, Lived in both Kansas and Britain
and experienced the worst of both nations bad weather. Worked as a local government emergency and civil defence planning officer for two years. A sat phone is a tool of communication, its signal can be accessed by various agencies and authorities from the Cival avaiation, Coast Guard, plus various other communications systems, I also believe that many Amatuer band radio hams monitor sat phone requencies, They are not at all useless, and they are cetainly better than nothing. BTW Sat phones were used in good if somewhat limiting factors in the Falklands conflicts by civilians passing intel back to the UK, Intel desperately needed by HMG to find out what the argies were doing. That famous steel hulled yacht that cruised the antartic before going up the Amazon in SA a few years ago used a sat nav phone to call for help when some pirates shot and killed the expedition leader. Sat nav phones recently save the life of some overland expedioneers who were being attacked in the Eygyption desert bay bandits from Sudan, A sat phone saved the life of some ( admittedly rich ) skiars near a place called Aspen in the US when they got stuck during a white out. Any communication media is a plus, even if it only offers hope.
Respects.
NR


[edit on 3-10-2008 by Northern Raider]



posted on Oct, 3 2008 @ 07:23 AM
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From one old fart to another welcome to the board. Your experience is sound. We will just have to agree to disagree on the phone. I would rather rely on skill than wait for others as I previously posted.

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Oct, 3 2008 @ 07:30 AM
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Originally posted by reluctantpawn
From one old fart to another welcome to the board. Your experience is sound. We will just have to agree to disagree on the phone. I would rather rely on skill than wait for others as I previously posted.

respectfully

reluctantpawn


On both points there we can certainly agree

Thanks for the warm and very interesting welcome

Respects
NR
BTW Less of the old fart please, I am miserable enough about turning 52 this week as it is


[edit on 3-10-2008 by Northern Raider]



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